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Marshall Hess ’88
The Plot Thickens

By Donna Parker

By day, he’s a multi-million dollar dealmaker as the Managing Director of Highland Capital Management, LP, but when the whistle blows at 5 o’clock, Marshall Hess becomes a real player. Of course, his partner is 3-year-old son, Christopher.

“First thing I do is start getting ready to play dinosaurs and Hot Wheels. I put down my briefcase and get down on the floor right away and start playing. If it’s a nice day, we head outside,” says this dedicated dad of two to Chris and 7-month-old Katherine who mostly just naps and eats.

“The kids are pretty much my life,” says Marshall who remained a bachelor until just five years ago, when he married Blainey, a CFO and VP for McGuire Oil Company. She’s not a fellow alumna, but Marshall jokes that at least her alma mater was in Trinity’s football conference.

During college, Marshall figured the only directing he’d be doing would be in the movies. Upon receiving his B.A. in Communications, he was off to Hollywood for a staff job with Henry Winkler Productions – yes, The Fonz. Then the writers went on strike, provoking a dramatic plot twist in Marshall’s career.

“Life tosses you a few left turns and you never look back,” says this dealmaker.

Instead, he looked ahead – to making his mark in commercial real estate, starting small and working his way up to millions of dollars in assets management – never forgetting his Trinity roots.

“Two of my investors have been alumni and once you reminisce about the past – you’re on. It provides immediate credibility in everything you do,” says Marshall, now Vice President and President-Elect of the Alumni Association.

“It’s a relationship-oriented business and Trinity has always built a great bond between students.”

So, although his personal movie credits would include Jim Bynum in Communications for inspiring him to reach for the stars in television and film, Marshall’s script took another direction, leading him to family and a job he loves. A happy ending, after all.


Marshall Hess '88