Contents:

Fundamentals of Human Communication

Mass Media

Web Publishing

Journalism and/as Ethnography

International Communication

Alternative Media

Media Writing: Reporting on/for the Internet

Course Listings

Robert Huesca, Assistant Professor

Trinity University
Department of Communication
715 Stadium Drive
San Antonio, TX 78212-7200

e-mail: rhuesca@trinity.edu



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COMM 1300: Fundamentals of Human Communication This class examines the concepts, principles, and applications of human communication theory and research with emphasis on formats, roles, strategies, and constraints on human communication in varied contexts.
COMM 1301:
Mass Media
This class will provide you with an introduction to: a) a theoretical framework for thinking about our current and future mass media system; b) some of the prominent communication theories used to understand the social functions and impact of mass media; and c) the contentious, practical issues facing news, entertainment, and advertising practitioners. The perspective adopted in the class is one of analyzing mass media as primarily an industrial force that shapes and is shaped by social, cultural, political, and economic structures. Lectures will not be a reiteration of material presented in the book, but there will be ample time for clarification and discussion of difficult issues from the reading as warranted by student concerns.
COMM 2125:
Web Publishing
This course combines design, production, implementation, and management of communication on the World Wide Web. Specifically, students in this class will plan and build a series of Web pages for the Department of Communication. Special attention will be given to the use of this new communication technology to be responsive to a diverse range of constituents: faculty, staff, students, outside visitors. Satisfactory completion of the course will give students conceptual (hypermedia, interactivity, nonlinearity) and practical skills (page design, HTML experience) that are highly desirable in today's communication marketplace.
COMM 2325:
Journalism and/as Ethnography
This class explores the relationship between the practice of journalism and the method of ethnography through readings and practice. The first part of the course will introduce you to the basic steps involved in conducting an ethnography. The second part of the course will require you to apply that knowledge to both readings and your own ethnographic project. The goals of the course are to: (a) achieve a broad understanding of what constitutes an ethnography; (b) develop an ability to analyze journalistic work using criteria from ethnographic methods; and (c) refine a variety of skills used in conducting an ethnography.
COMM 3322:
International Communication
This class examines the role of communication in two areas: third world development and international relations. In the area of development communication, we will study the evolution of major theories of development, current problems facing development communicators, and concrete applications of communication to problems in development. In the area of international relations, we will study theoretical and practical concepts of communication from both contemporary and historical perspectives, particularaly as they relate to issues of cultural autonomy, political rights, and social justice.
COMM 3325:
Alternative Media
The purpose of this course is to: a) provide students with historical and conceptual frameworks for thinking about "alternative media"; b) introduce students to numerous exemplars and practitioners in this field; and c) give hands-on experience with two specific alternative media projects.
COMM 3330:
Media Writing: Reporting on/for the Internet
The rapid development of new communication technologies is posing exciting challenges to media practitioners. On the one hand, journalists are enabled by many new modes of gathering, processing, organizing, presenting, and distributing information. On the other hand, ordinary users of new communication technologies seem to be turning away from traditional journalistic forms--even those placed "on line"--in large numbers. What this indicates is a failure of mainstream practitioners to produce a responsive journalism that is relevant to media users. This class offers students an opportunity to explore and experiment with new modes of communicating opened up by these new technologies.

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