Excel, JavaScript, and Other Helpers and Videos
Bob Jensen

Department of Business Administration
Trinity University

Table of Contents


Video (Scroll Down)

Screen Capture

Audio

Excel

JavaScript

The best use of a teacher's videos, in my viewpoint, is by students seeking to learn something technical that an instructor does not want to have to explain over and over in class and in office hours ---
http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/acct5342/

TeacherTube (a video server for teachers) --- http://www1.teachertube.com/


Advanced video production for your touch screen computer or mobile---
Http://www.touchcast.com
Thank you Richard Campbell for the heads up on March 22, 2014.

So if you have an IPad, go to the above link to view their sample content.
Also you can download the free app to create content on your IPad.


"University of Leeds Plans to Capture 50,000 Hours of Video Annually With Mediasite," by Rhea Kelly, Campus Technology, February 10, 2014 ---
http://campustechnology.com/articles/2014/02/10/university-of-leeds-plans-to-capture-50000-hours-of-video-annually-with-mediasite.aspx?=ct21

The University of Leeds in the United Kingdom is deploying Sonic Foundry's Mediasite Enterprise Video Platform for lecture capture and multimedia management. The Mediasite system automates the capture, management, delivery and search of live and on-demand videos and rich media.

"This is a significant investment which will transform teaching and learning here at Leeds," said Neil Morris, director of digital learning at the university, in a prepared statement. "Not only can we capture all our audio and video assets, but Mediasite will allow us to store, manage and publish content across multiple channels."

While the university had previously captured lectures on a limited scale, it wanted to scale up its efforts with a single video platform that integrates with its Blackboard learning management system. Expecting to capture about 50,000 hours of content annually, the school plans to record lectures and other teaching activities to give students a flexible and personalized approach to learning. All content will be searchable, secure and managed in one place via Mediasite.

"We know our students learn in different ways, so as well as attending lectures, this gives them the opportunity to engage with the materials wherever they may be and at their own pace," continued Morris. "Whether that's going over topics that are particularly complex or using recordings to help with revision, this new system will provide over 30,000 students with outstanding resources to support their learning."

Continued in article

Bob Jensen's video helpers are at
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/thetools.htm#Video

Also note that BYU teaches the first two accounting courses almost entirely on video with only infrequent classroom meetings ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/thetools.htm#BYUvideo

 


Screencast (I like Camtasia) --- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screencast

I flipped my classrooms largely by preparing hundreds of short Camtasia how-to video on technical aspects of my accounting theory and AIS courses --- especially on technical aspects of FAS 133 and MS Access relational database accounitng. My students just were not getting some of this technical I explained in class, and I grew weary repeating the same material over and over and over again in my office. The Camtasia videos were a huge relief to my students and me. They could play each Camtasia video repeatedly until they mastered the topic. I rarely had to explain those topics during office hours when Camtasia explanations were available to students.

The Camtasia videos also meant I did not have to devote so much class time to teaching technical procedures. This made more free time for class quizzes to verify that students were really mastering those technical opics.

"Data on whether and how students watch screencasts," by Robert Talbert, Chronicle of Higher Education, April 4, 2013 --- Click Here
http://chronicle.com/blognetwork/castingoutnines/2013/04/04/data-on-whether-and-how-students-watch-screencasts/?cid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

Chromecast --- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromecast
"
Streaming Video Magic with Chromecast," by Ryan Cordell, Chronicle of Higher Education, October 21, 2013 ---
http://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/streaming-video-magic-with-chromecast/52969?cid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en


"Who does screencasting help the most?" by Robert Talbert, Chronicle of Higher Education, May 6, 2013 ---
http://chronicle.com/blognetwork/castingoutnines/2013/05/06/who-does-screencasting-help-the-most/?cid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

. . .

What does this mean? I think it suggests that screencasts, when done well and deployed properly, help all students – they certainly don’t hurt – and they help most thise students who need the most help. The analogies to mathematics courses are clear. In any math course there will be a large contingent of students whose backgrounds aren’t congruous with the course: students whose prior math background is weak to rusty, students from non-STEM disciplines, and so on. For those students, if they use the screencasts, then they may be likely to improve at a surprisingly fast rate.

Finally, let me reiterate this was not a flipped classroom situation in this study. It was a traditional classroom with screencasts made on demand based on what students said was the “muddiest point” in a class meeting. So there was a high degree of student engagement from the beginning with these screencasts — students asked for them, they watched them voluntarily, and they did so with specific agendas in mind. This makes a good case for using screencasts to augment an existing course that might be quite traditional in its setup.

But what if this had been a flipped classroom, and the screencasts were not homework review but rather the first contact students had with the material, and students were required to watch them before coming to class? What if the element of choice is missing, and what if students don’t approach the videos with a specific to-do list? Would we see similar learning gains when compared to a traditional class (without screencasts)? I suspect we might, but since the flipped classroom is not really about videos but about meaningful classroom experiences, it would be a lot hard to say just exactly what the screencasts are doing for the students. What do you think?

Continued in article

Jensen Comment

I made over 100 Camtasia videos, most of which I served up on a campus LAN drive. I found that they helped almost all of my students, especially when teaching very technical topics. For example, I have an Excel illustration of how to value an interest rate swap. This is a very complicated task, especially when combined with accounting rules on how to account for interest rate swaps as speculations versus hedges.

The advantage of these screen casts is that students can repeat each screencast until they yell out;
"Eureaka --- At last I understand it!"


Research Electronic Data Capture --- http://www.project-redcap.org/


"Creating and Sharing Videos That Are Not Too Long and Not Too Short: Two services let you gather photos and video clips, and upload them for automated video editing," by Walter S. Mossberg, The Wall Street Journal, July 2, 2013 ---
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323936404578581651707015148.html

. . .

This week, I tested two such services, Magisto and Animoto. Both work on iPhones and Android phones, but also via Web browsers on PCs and Macs. Both offer free versions, as well as paid versions with richer features.

I found both worked well, but Magisto was easier to use. It, however, offered fewer options and less control. It's focused on automated video editing based on algorithms it claims allow it to deduce the gist, or emotion, of the video, in accordance with the theme. Animoto offers more customization, with a greater variety of styles and more manual controls. It keys its production mainly from the music you choose.

Each has some drawbacks, but I generally preferred Magisto. It took less time and its free version offers longer videos. I'd use Animoto if I wanted greater control.

With each service, I was able to make short videos of family events like Thanksgiving dinner and a wedding, which took almost no effort and time. The videos looked professional and pleasing to people with whom I shared them.

Both services store your videos on their servers. Both allow you to share your videos by sending links to select groups of friends and family. They also allow you to share videos more widely on Facebook, Twitter and other social networks. But neither is a social network itself. Both offer either music they've licensed or allow you to upload your own.

Magisto, which launched in 2012, makes videos of up to one minute and 15 seconds long free of charge. A paid version costs $5 a month or $18 a year for videos of up to 2 minutes.

Animoto, which has been around since 2007 (it started out as a way to make slide shows from photos), gives you just 30-second videos free and charges $5 a month, or $30 a year, for videos of up to 10 minutes long, though the company says average projects are two to three minutes. Animoto also has costlier plans with longer durations for professionals like wedding photographers.

I used short video clips of events and tried each service in a Web browser and via iPhone apps. I emailed links to friends and family and did test posts to Facebook.

Magisto has a beautiful, clean interface, with clearly labeled steps and buttons that say "Next," and, when you're done, "It's a Wrap!" and "You're Done." Like Animoto, the automated process takes a few minutes to produce the movie on its servers and notify you by email when your movie is ready.

My finished Magisto movies looked good and weren't cheesy. The service adds panning and zooming to photos, changes from color to monochrome, and creatively shows your video clips—for instance, quickly repeating key sections, or stopping the videos to make it look like a photo is being snapped, complete with a shutter sound. I especially liked one wedding project I did accompanied by the song "Chapel of Love."

But Magisto's main drawback is that it only offers 11 themes and I found these either too specific or general to match my projects. The company says it's adding more themes. Also, the iPhone version is marred by a giant pop-up ad for a sponsor running a contest.

Animoto took longer to use, partly because I found its interface harder to decode, and partly because it let me choose which parts of my video clips it would use. Animoto only uses 10 seconds of each of your clips in its finished movie, interspersing these segments with photos and text you create. By default, it takes the first 10 seconds you create.

But Animoto doesn't work in a clear step-by-step fashion. In particular, when you're done, instead of saying the movie is completed and being processed on the server, it merely has a button saying you can preview the video.

But Animoto has features Magisto lacks, like the ability to add text frames and 44 styles. These included many general ones, like "Air" and "Fire," that would work with more projects.

I found my Animoto movies were pleasant, but a bit more basic than the Magisto examples. The same wedding looked less interesting and more like a slide show with some effects in Animoto.

Your reactions may differ, however, and your material may lend itself better to one service than the other. Both work well and I urge you to try them if you want more than Vine or Instagram offer, with less work than a full video-editing app.

 


However, there are quite a few other screeencast video capturing alternatives and hosts ---
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_screencasting_software
This is a pretty impressive Wikipedia comparison site!

 

Video Capturing:  TechSmith Camtasia vs. Adobe Captivate
March 2011 Messaging on the AECM
Camtasia --- http://www.techsmith.com/camtasia/
Captivate --- http://www.adobe.com/products/captivate/
March 17, 2011 message from Louis Matherne

AECMers,

As I recall, several of AECMers use screen recording software. I need to license a screen recording application. I’ve used Camtasia in the past (version 5) and that is what I’m planning to use going forward.

Should I consider anything else like Adobe Captivate?

Thanks!

J. Louis Matherne
Chief of Taxonomy Development
Financial Accounting Standards Board

LMatherne@fasb.org
203-956-5229
 www.fasb.org


March 17, 2011 reply from Richard Campbell

Louis:
I use both Camtasia and Captivate, but prefer Camtasia.

However, Captivate can create simulations, and Camtasia can not do that.

Techsmith has superior customer support (free) and Adobe has terrible customer support (you pay big bucks)!

Richard J. Campbell
mailto:campbell@rio.edu

 


March 17, 2011 reply from Richard Newmark

Luis,

I use Camtasia (version7) to record my 75-minute class sessions. I use a tabletPC so all the notes I write in Windows Journal, and annotations I make—on PowerPoint slides, Word documents, Excel files, pdf documents, and more—are all done on my screen so they are all captured by Camtasia. The Camtasia project file for my 1280 x 800 full-screen capture is between 600MB – 1GB, depending on how much movement there is on the screen. My final Mp4 file is 35MB - 50MB (unless I show a video during class whereby the file size can be 75-100MB). I post these files in BlackBoard so students can view/review the files. Since I do in-class quizzes using clickers, posting the videos has not affected attendance in my classes. My students find that having the videos available online makes the interviewing season less stressful because they don’t have to worry as much about missing class.

I make the cursor 1.5X size and highlight the cursor, so when I use the cursor to point out important text or computations, it is easy for students to see that when they view the videos. When I do application demonstrations, I add effects for left-click and right-click. Does anybody know if you can differentiate between an click and a drag in Camtasia, because you can do so with screencast-o-matic http://www.screencast-o-matic.com/ , a free browser-based screencast tool?

I have never used Adobe Captivate, but my colleagues who do use it do so because they can insert hot spots like Richard described, and hover-overs. They love the control and flexibility they get with Captivate, but it is more expensive and they think the learning curve is steeper.

That’s my 2 cents.

Rick

----------------------------------------

Richard Newmark
Professor, School of Accounting and Computer Information Systems
Kenneth W. Monfort College of Business
2004 Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award Winner
University of Northern Colorado
Campus Box 128, Kepner Hall 2095D
Greeley, CO 80639
(970) 351-1213 (office)
(970) 351-1068 (fax)
http://PhDuh.com/unc


March 17, 2011 reply from Bob Jensen

Hi Louis,

The earlier comments in this thread provide some good comparison information.

One thing that Captivate does pretty well that is not done easily or well in Camtasia is the capturing of streaming video clip inserts with high quality audio capturing without having to pass the audio through a microphone ---
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oQZVdDzEssQ 
Update:  Techsmith made now corrected this defect in Camtasia

Question
How can you capture Camtasia audio without a microphone (e.g., for embedding a YouTube clip in your Camtasia video)?

Hint
Go to Windows 7 or anything higher that XP.

Answer from Mike Curtis
http://feedback.techsmith.com/techsmith/topics/audio_without_a_microphone_in_camtasia_studio

 

There are other features worth noting about Captivate are listed at http://store.adobe.com/store/en_us/popup/software/captivate5/reasonstobuy.html 

If you have learning curve concerns, I suggest that you conduct a search of YouTube tutorials available for both Captivate and Camtasia. Some of these tutorials are quite good. For example, note the Captivate Branching Tutorial --- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oQZVdDzEssQ 

I'm a Camtasia user because I was began over a decade ago with Version 1 of Camtasia. But if I were to start all over again, I think I would go the Captivate route because you can do more professional things with Captivate. Sometimes you get what you pay for, although many professors may not need so many professionalism features if they will never use those features.

I do think that professors would make more use of captured streaming video clips in their own video productions, in which case Captivate may be a better alternative. For example, portions of a the many video lectures on YouTube or TED might be captured for use in a professor's homemade video.

Both Captivate and Camtasia now allow rather easy ways to add closed captioning for hearing impaired users of your videos --- http://www.adobe.com/accessibility/products/captivate/Adobe_Captivate_cc_tutorial_demo.html

Robert (Bob) Jensen
Trinity University Emeritus Jesse H. Jones Professor of Accounting
190 Sunset Hill Road, Sugar Hill, NH 03586
603-823-8482
rjensen@trinity.edu


Interactive Camtasia

The amazing thing about Camtasia is that it's so simple to learn for anybody who already knows how to use common software like spread sheets and word processors. There are wonderful video tutorials on YouTube.  and at the TechSmith site.

March 24, 2013 message from Richard Campbell

This video shows how a professor of marketing from Central Michigan University makes his lectures interactive with Camtasisa.

http://youtu.be/98-2AYZA6UI 

You will see an example of chromakeying (greenscreening) that is coming in the next minor dot release to Camtasia Studio for windows v8,


From the Scout Report on March 29, 2013

Free Alternative to Camtasia for Mac Users
Ripcorder Screen ---
https://itunes.apple.com/app/ripcorder-screen/id532632386?mt=12 

The Ripcorder Screen application allows users to create movies from their Macs' on-screen activities. The application will capture whatever is played on the display and transform it into a QuickTime movie. This can be most useful for users who would like to share information with colleagues or friends seeking to learn more about a particular computer operation or process. This version is compatible with all operating systems running Mac OS X 10.7 and newer.

There is also a Ricorder Audio App


Ribbet --- http://www.ribbet.com/ 

Ribbet offers visitors the opportunity to edit their photos on the fly online. The site gives users the ability to crop, resize, and rotate their images, along with adding captions in a host of different fonts. Also, there are a number of compelling special filters with names like Cairo, Morocco, Los Angeles, and Fiji. This version is compatible with all operating systems.


Earlier messaging of possible interest
January 7, 2011 message from Rick Newmark

I have been using Camtasia Studio to record my class sessions and to create tutorials for about two years now. Thanks to all of you on this list who have provided great information about various products, especially the practical tips and real-world problems and solutions.

I decided that creating video tutorials and presentations is a practical skill that my students should learn to help them effectively communicate electronically. I also think this skill will give them a competitive advantage in the work place and help them build their personal brand on the social web.

The problem with putting Camtasia and/or Adobe Captivate (I have not used it, but some of my friends across campus use it because it has more interactive tools) in the computer labs is the cost and that students would have to pay to put it on their own computers. Also, I want something really simple to use.

Initially, I found an open-source and free application called CamStudio. However, it only works on PCs and there is a learning curve similar to Camtasia Recorder. Although I have not yet used it, it seems like a good product and there are some Youtube tutorials to help you get started. This seems like the most robust free alternative to Camtasia.

Then, some additional searching pointed me to several browser-based (no downloads and platform independent) solutions. I found the following solutions: http://screenr.com/, http://www.screenjelly.com/, and http://www.screencast-o-matic.com/. Screenr and Screenjelly are designed to make screencasts for Twitter. Neither one gives you much control. Screenr has a five-minute recording limit, allows you to set the capture area, and allows you to pause and resume. Screenjelly has a three-minute limit and only records the full screen. Screenr requires a Twitter account, but Screenjelly allows you to email the link rather than tweeting it. Both only you to capture audio from your microphone, so if you you need to turn up the volume on your speakers if you also want audio from the computer captured. The clear upsides to these solutions is that they are fast and easy and interface with Twitter. The downside is that they have a short time limit and they do not provide tools for tutorials like highlighting the cursor.

Fortunately, I found Screencast-O-Matic http://www.screencast-o-matic.com/. It has the following features: no time limit for recordings, pause and resume, set capture area, automatically highlight cursor, visually show left- and right-clicks, visually shows left-button- and right-button-dragging, add comments on the bottom of the screen at different pre-determined times, and allows you to download your screencasts in Mp4, AVI, or FLV formats, allows you to capture video from a webcam, and they will host for free all of your screencasts <= 15-minutes per screencast. I made a sample video and the results are very good. A 2-minute 1366 x 768 video took 10MB (Mp4 format). For $9/year, you can host videos up to 60-minutes long, lose the small watermark at the bottom left of the screen (unobtrusive), and get Camtasia-style editing tools like: zoom, cut out a piece of a clip, split and insert a clip, change speeds, and add transitions. The web site has good tutorials for basic operation and using the advanced tools. I have not yet paid for the pro membership, though I plan on doing so. I’m very excited about getting students and my colleagues to use this tool.

What I really like is that students can take their screencast and bring it into iMovie or Windows Moviemaker and add screenshots by using the Windows  snipping tool or 7capturehttp://www.7capture.com/. 7capture good for capturing whole windows because it captures the rounded corners on a window, but you need to make sure that the window you want to capture is on top (only captures whole windows, a whole monitor, or your entire desktop). Here is a link to take screen shots on a mac http://graphicssoft.about.com/od/screencapturemac/ht/macscreenshot.htm.

If your students do not have their own computer and your lab machines do not have Moviemaker, I found a browser-based alternative, JayCut http://jaycut.com/, though I am not impressed by the video image quality. I’m now trying Creaza. It is a suite of online tools, including audio editing, video editing, concept mapping, and making cartoons. I’ll update the list as I try the tools.

Richard Newmark
Professor, School of Accounting and Computer Information Systems
Kenneth W. Monfort College of Business
2004 Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award Winner
University of Northern Colorado
Campus Box 128, Kepner Hall 2095D
Greeley, CO 80639
(970) 351-1213 Office
(970) 351-1078 fax

http://PhDuh.com/unc

Update
 

Question
How can you capture Camtasia audio without a microphone (e.g., for embedding a YouTube clip in your Camtasia video)?

Hint
Go to Windows 7 or anything higher that XP.

Answer from Mike Curtis
http://feedback.techsmith.com/techsmith/topics/audio_without_a_microphone_in_camtasia_studio

January 7, 2011 reply from Bob Jensen

Hi Rick,

Thank you for the very informative message. In your updates you might tell us more about video compression, codecs, and playback comparisons of these various alternatives. There are also such added features such as interactive playback and quiz/examination features in such compressions as the swf compression of Shockwave format --- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SWF

With so many hours of video, I'm curious about how you archive these files and how you serve them up for students.

One really helpful feature that I find in Camtasia is the "pause" feature that allows you to pause the recording of a video and then take it up at the exact same point after the pause. One use of this feature is to prepare for the next phase of the video and collect your notes and thoughts for that phase.

Some other questions you might answer:

  1. Can you record audio internally without having to pass audio through a microphone such as when embedding video clips within a video?
     
  2. Does the recorder have enhancement features similar to those in Camtasia such as mouse highlighting.
     
  3. Can you customize the screen capturing with smaller windows and floating windows that follow the mouse?
     
  4. Can you vary audio and video capture rates so that, when necessary, you can greatly cut back on storage requirements except in cases where higher capture rates improve lip synchronization. High capture rates are less important when you are capturing computer screens such as Excel screens.

Bob Jensen


Compressed Versus Uncompressed AVI Camtasia Video Files
Podcasting and Vodcasting Using Camtasia and Screencast

Although I've been using Camtasia for years, I've recently been preparing some Camtasia video for a road show that I will do on education technology. Camtasia is wonderful for making educational videos, especially narrated videos of lessons and tutorials on computer screens, videos of narrated PowerPoint files, interactive videos, podcasts (audio), Vodcasts (video), and narrated sequences of pictures turned into video files.

One really nice thing about Camtasia is that you do not have to record an entire video clip continuously, It's easy to record a segment and then hit the pause button (or F9 that's used both to start a recording session and pause a recording session). That way you have time for each segment to think about what you're going to say and to bring up software, video files, audio files, and/or Websites appropriate for that segment of the clip. When you've finished the entire clip you can hit the stop button (or F10) to generate a avi file. Later on you can "produce" a compressed version of the clip.

Camtasia generally captures video as uncompressed avi files. These uncompressed files are enormous and are not efficient for storing on CDs, DVDs, Web servers, Blackboard servers, WebCT servers, etc. Fortunately Camtasia has software called "Producer" in Camtasia Suite that compresses videos into much smaller files that can be played in common software such as wmv files for Windows Media Player, rm files for RealMedia, mov files for Quicktime, scf files for Adobe flash, mp3 files, and other "production" files.

I thought you might be interested in how much disk space is saved in the compression process. Last weekend I made a number of Camtasia avi videos and then compressed them into wmv video for Windows Media Player. I have both an old Camtasia 2 and a current Camtasia 4 (with updates). I captured the avi files using Camtasia 4, because this will also capture video playing on the screen. However, I found that the Producer software in Camtasia 2 gave me smaller compressed video files for some reason. The savings are shown below comparing the avi files and my compressed files:

Video Uncompressed AVI File Size Compressed Video File Size Video Run Time
Video 1 106,095 KB avi 5,928 KB wmv 02.57minutes
Video 2 319,904 KB avi 29,586 KB wmv 22.28 minutes
Video 3 162,745 KB avi 22,228 KB swf 05.47 minutes
Video 4 25,315 KB avi 4,766 KB wmv 04.49 minutes

Warning 1:  You can only edit the video (e.g., add fades, delete portions of clips, combine clips, split clits, change volume, etc) in the uncompressed avi video using Producer software. You lose quality in video and audio if you have to re-capture a compressed video as a avi file using Camtasia. Hence, it is best to store the initial avi files somewhere if you think you might want to edit later on.

Warning 2:  You probably will not get this compression efficiency when compressing to mp4 and other files other than wmv compressions.

The video size to runtime ratio varies greatly with both the capture rate and the size of the region on a computer screen that you are capturing. Since all the above videos were captured at the same (default) capture rate, the ratio of file size to run time varies greatly because the capture region varies in size in each of the above videos.  Capturing only a region greatly saves on the size of the captured video file. Capturing full or nearly-full screen sizes greatly adds to the video file size.

Video size relative to video run time also depends heavily on the frame rate at which the video is captured. Camtasia allows you to use a default setting for both the capture rate and audio interleaving. This is fast enough to capture video with audio playing on the screen with reasonable lip synching if the audio shows the face of a speaker. If you were making a video of a PowerPoint file without adding audio narration you could save disk space by greatly slowing down the video capture rate. However, I generally do not mess with the default settings. If you want to change the frame rates, you can read more about it --- Click Here
You can also change playback rates --- Click Here

Camtasia allows you to do some things like highlighting where your cursor is pointing. I generally use a big yellowish translucent circle around my mouse pointer. You can also have audio sounds whenever you click on your mouse and/or keyboard. This may alert student attention. You can also bring up a pen that allows you to write on video screens without writing on the computer program, like Excel, that you are running in the video.

You can also pan and zoom. Zoom lets you point to something like a cell formula in Excel and then make that formula larger and larger and larger. You can subsequently return to normal size. I use the panning feature when I am only recording a region of a screen such as a rectangle about a third of the size of the full computer screen. Capturing only a region greatly saves on the size of the captured video file. I use the panning feature to allow me to float the capture region to wherever I move my mouse. This allows me to capture anything appearing on a computer screen without having to capture a full screen in every video frame.

Years ago I started using Camtasia to field questions posed by students. For example, after technical lessons in my Accounting Information Systems course, I almost always received email messages from students who could not get something to work, especially in Excel and MS Access. I would then record a video tutorial and shared my answers with the entire current class and my future classes. You can download some of my sample wmv tutorials in this regard from http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/acct5342/
The acronym PQQ stands for Possible Quiz Question source.

I also prepared longer tutorials on more complicated technical lectures in my Accounting Theory course. Most all of my students were confused after my lectures in this course until they viewed my video tutorials over and over and over. Some of my tutorials for the theory course are at http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/acct5341/

I also recorded some general tutorials that you can download from http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/Tutorials/

I have other tutorials that are filed away somewhere on CDs. It would take some effort to dig them out now.

The nice thing about Camtasia is that it's is so simple to use when creating and compressing video. Editing video is more complicated. It is also possible to add hot spots to swf flash video that you have compressed such that you can create interactive videos for your students, including examination videos. However, this is extremely tedious. I found it better to create my interactive examination files in Excel and then link to my tutorial videos at any time in those Excel files.

The hard thing about Camtasia is getting the audio to sound professional. Actually, I found my narrations using a cheap microphone adequate for my course tutorials. This weekend I had satisfactory results using only the internal microphone that's built into my Dell laptop. However, audio could be improved with an expensive microphone and a sound proof booth. Ambient noise in your office can be irritating when recorded in video.

If you are recording in your office, you should probably disconnect the telephone during recording sessions. Also put a sign on your office door that you are in a recording session.

It is also possible to make videos of PowerPoint files. If you choose to do so you can easily add a Camtasia toolbar in your PowerPoint file such that you can make videos with audio narrations on any any part or all of a PowerPoint file. That way you can teach from PowerPoint when you're out of town, retired, or dead.Users can download compressed video files of PowerPoint files with less virus risk than from any MS Office files such as doc, xls. or ppt files. However, when I narrate any of my PowerPoint files and make videos of them, I generally find that even the compressed videos are enormous since my PowerPoint files usually have more than 50 slides. Actually, it is probably best to compress PowerPoint vides at a slow frame rate as swf Flash files. Since Powerpoint is not fast moving video, a slower frame rate is usually quite satisfactory.

Nevertheless, recording and serving up entire lectures requires huge amounts of disk space. If your university will not provide you with enough Web, Blackboard, or WebCT server space for such large video files, I suggest that you make a DVD disk of compressed video for each lesson and then make these disks available in the library or by mail to students. Your campus media center may have more creative solutions.

August 22, 2009 message from Bob Jensen

Hi Pat,

It is possible to first practice with a limited and free version called Jing at TechSmith --- http://www.jingproject.com/
I bought Camtasia Studio to start with and never bothered with Jing  I have not yet checked to see if Jing is available to Mac users. I doubt it.

I’m not sure whether or not some of the Camtasia features mentioned below are available in Jing, e.g., the F9 toggle key.

It took me less than an hour to record the first-time video you see at
http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/acct5342/

All you have to do is install the Camtasia Studio program, connect your computer to a microphone (I don’t care much for the microphone built into a laptop, but I use that on the road) read some simple instructions, and try your first video. You can watch the tutorials provided by TechSmith and my somewhat dated tutorial on how to use Camtasia at http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/Tutorials/CamtasiaTutorial.wmv

There are important tricks that you learn along the way. One of the most important things is to learn how to toggle the record and pause recording keys (for me that is the F9 key). In my typical session I think about what I will say for about two minutes, bring up the starting screen that you want to focus on such as an Excel spreadsheet of the IASB home page, record two minutes, hit the F9 key, take a drink, bring up a screen that I want to start with for the first two minutes of recording, record for approximately two minutes, hit the F9 key, and repeat this until I’m done. Then I hit the F10 key. Students watching the video never know that I paused frequently while recording the session. View one of my many sessions at http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/Tutorials/CamtasiaTutorial.wmv

The really big problem is storage space for your recorded videos. The initial avi files are huge, but you want to save these until you are happy with any edits you give to your video. Then choose one of the many compressed versions that you can “produce” such as making an avi file, wmv file, mpg, mov, or other file. I like wmv files because they are recognized on most user computers. If I were to send a video to YouTube, I would probably choose mpg since that seems to be preferred by YouTube folks. Techsmith will explain all of the ins and outs of choosing a particular compressed file. The important thing is that compression normally saves over 90% of the file space needed to store the video.

I generally download the original avi file to a DVD disc if possible just to save it for later recall and editing. But I save a lot of my compressed files on my Web server in the Computer Science Department at Trinity University.

If you want to do what I do, you will have to persuade Fordham to give you quite a lot of Web server space. Putting your files on a Web server is really easy, and many folks at Fordham can show you how to do this in less than an hour, including making your default htm file (probably labeled default.htm) that is the screen that first appears at your Web site.

You can also download your videos to the Blackboard server, but I really doubt that you are given enough free space on Blackboard or WebCT to hold much video.

You can of course get tons of free storage space on YouTube, but then you have to allow the public to see your videos. They can find your videos even if you keep the YouTube links secret since the YouTube search engine roams the YouTube world.

Here’s an idea of something that might be useful to your students. They may be confused about how to use the Fordham password entry into the FASB Codification database.

1.       Start with your browser such as Internet Explorer open to most any site.

2.       Start to record your video.

3.       Show students how to bring up the Codification starting page. Hit the F9 pause key.

4.       Think about what you will say next and hit the F9 key to start recoding again.

5.       Enter your login and Fordham’s password (but I would not speak the password out loud)

6.       Click the login button and bring up the Codification database. Hit the F9 pause key.

7.       Think about what you will say next and hit the F9 key to start recoding again.

8.       Show students how to bring up the Table of Contents

9.       Show students how to bring up the search engine

10.   Show students how to navigate

11.   Show students how to log off

12.   Hit the F10 key when you’ve finished recording your video

As I get older I’m really afraid that I will screw up something really technical in front of an audience. I love having my backup videos that are error free. An example of one of these backup videos is the 133ex05a.wmv video file at http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/acct5341/
I also watch the video in private before each presentation to refresh my mind for a live demonstration. 

After you get better you can pan and zoom your videos an do all sorts of wonderful things. And you’re correct. Richard is good at using Camtasia, although neither he nor I seem to use all the available bells and whistles.

Hope this helps.

Bob Jensen

August 22, 2009 message from Bob Jensen

Hi Again Pat,

Here are some other points to note.

I doubt whether Jing is yet available to Mac users, but I’ve not yet checked for certain.

TechSmith provides some free (maybe a gig) of storage space for your Camtasia videos, but I never thought it was enough space to bother with unless I paid by the month to purchase more serious space. I still think Fordham will give you adequate space on a Web or LAN server as long as your videos are intended to benefit students and me.

My biggest complaint with TechSmith is that the audio for your recorded videos must pass through a microphone. This is a bummer if you frequently want to capture audio or video clips into your video. For example, suppose you want to capture five minutes of a 75-minute YouTube lecture. Camtasia has never provided an option to capture the audio portion of video directly into your recording. Instead you must turn your speakers up and capture the sound on your microphone. The resulting audio that’s captured sounds hollow. If you do it right you can make out the captured audio, but that’s about all. It’s very irritating to listen very long to audio captured in this manner. But the audio of your voice sounds fine if you want to add comments while the other video or audio is being recorded.

For example, if you were recording from one of Jensen’s videos you could interject a comment like “Bob Jensen really screwed up on this part.”

I have some examples of Camtasia recording of video in my dog and pony show PowerPoint slides in my 50Camtasia.ppt file listed at http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/EdTech/PowerPoint/
In particular go to Slide 29 and click on any one of the links where I recorded portions of a TechSmith tutorial on interactive video

You can improve on audio recording by having an expensive microphone (mine is cheap) and use lots of caution to avoid ambient noise like your telephone ringing or somebody knocking at your door. Of course if a noise commences while you’re recording video, you can hit the F9 pause key instantly to minimize the distraction on your video. It may be best when you commence once again to make a joke like --- that was my husband phoning to invite me to the Burger King for a romantic dinner after work tonight.

I do illustrate a few of the bells and whistles (panning and zooming) in my dog and pony show PowerPoint slides in my 50Camtasia.ppt file listed at http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/EdTech/PowerPoint/

Bob Jensen


"Google yanking H.264 video out of Chrome," by Stephen Shankland, cnet news, January 11, 2011 ---
http://news.cnet.com/8301-17939_109-20028196-2.html?tag=nl.e776
Thanks to David Fordham for the heads up.


Videos Illustrating How to Make Videos Using Camtasia Version 7.1

October 13, 2011 message from Rick Newmark

Here are three videos that I made to show my colleagues how to use Camtasia to make a class video for when you go out of town, or to create a tutorial for your class. I figured that some of you might be interested, so here they are. Please note that these are not Richard Campbell-quality videos. I shot these quickly and without any script. I made only a couple of minor edits.

Also, please note I used Screencast-O-Matic to make the first part of Part 1 so that I could capture setting up Camtasia Recorder. Pay attention to before and after I press the Record button to see the differences between the two applications.

How to record a class using Camtasia 7

http://youtu.be/PdSsVcLBsMM Part 1 - Setting up Camtasia Recorder and recording a class video.

http://youtu.be/aqUd8kD4VM8 Part 2  - Producing your Camtasia recording for posting in BlackBoard.

http://youtu.be/4KLNlxZOleE Part 3 - Posting your video in BlackBoard.

 

FYI, In Part 1, I used the following to demonstrate different ways to use Camtasia

1.       Running virtual machines on your PC using Virtual Box

         Apple Snow Leopard 10.6

         Linux Ubuntu 11.04

2.       Creating a two-table query in Access 2010

3.       Demonstrating how to use Windows Journal with a Tablet PC—also applies to using the Sympodium on a classroom computer.

         I showed how to use the REA Enterprise Ontology, t-accounts, and journal entries to explain the following

                                                               i.       The nature of accounts receivable and unearned revenue, including the duality imbalance that creates them

                                                             ii.      How to use t-accounts to design database queries to compute accounts receivable and unearned revenue.

 

Rick

----------------------------------------

Richard Newmark
Professor, School of Accounting and Computer Information Systems
Kenneth W. Monfort College of Business

2004 Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award Winner
University of Northern Colorado
Campus Box 128, Kepner Hall 2095D
Greeley, CO 80639
(970) 351-1213 (office)
(970) 351-1068 (fax)
http://PhDuh.com/unc

Bob Jensen's threads on Camtasia are at
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideos.htm

Note that I find the F9 toggle key very useful for pausing for periods of rest and preparation during the recording of a relatively long video.

Many of my old videos will not run in Windows 7 because Microsoft dropped an an audio codec.

 


From the Scout Report on January 21, 2011

JayCut 2.2 --- http://jaycut.com/ 

Do you want to edit your videos? But you say you don't have any video editing software? Never fear, as JayCut is here. With JayCut visitors can sign up for free and create their own voice-overs, work with slow-motion effects, and even throw in a green screen or two for dramatic affect. This version is compatible with Windows 2000 and newer.

From the Scout Report on March 11, 2011

Zamzar --- http://zamzar.com/ 

The name Zamzar comes from a character in the book "The Metamorphosis", and it is a fitting name as this program is a way to effective transform songs, videos, and so on into different formats. The program is quite seamless, and users need to just select files or URLs to convert, inset them into the form on their website, and select a file type. Zamzar will convert the file and send it to the user's email address. This version is compatible with computers running all operating systems.


Bob Jensen's essay on codec problems is on the Web at
http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/VideoCodecProblems.htm

Bob Jensen's video helpers ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideos.htm

 

Most faculty serve up video from their university's servers, YouTube, and Tech Smith's Screencast, but there are other alternatives

"How to Choose the Right Host For Your Online Video," By Robin Miller, ReadWriteWeb, July 25, 2011 ---
http://www.readwriteweb.com/cloud/2011/07/how-to-choose-the-right-host-f.php

Bob Jensen's video helpers are at
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideosSummary.htm

Also see
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideos.htm

 


You can view an outdated tutorial video for a very old version of Camtasia that I captured for my students to years ago to help them when learning Camtasia. ---
http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/Tutorials/CamtasiaTutorial.wmv
Although the newer versions of Camtasia changed screen capturing somewhat, the screen capturing process is almost the same process today as I illustrated in the above video.

In my viewpoint Camtasia is still the gold standard for video screen capturing although the price is now over $300 for the latest version. As Richard suggested, you might begin with the Jing free version, but for compression you will have to move up to Jing Pro or Camtasia.

Normally you capture avi files that are easy to edit but are enormous in size. Compression ("producing") saves you over 90% of video file size without serious loss of quality. However, save your initial avi files in case you want to edit the videos later on and re-compress them.

When I made the above tutorial video I was mostly creating rm Real Media compressions. Later I shifted to wmv compressions since my students mostly used Windows Media Player for playback.

You can view samples of my Camtasia files at
http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/

One of the better examples of Camtasia capturing is Amy Dunbar's video.
May 31, 2010 message from Amy Dunbar [Amy.Dunbar@BUSINESS.UCONN.EDU]
.

I just finished the first week of a 12-week MSA online tax course at UConn. I put students in groups and I ask them to work fairly lengthy quizzes (homework) independently, putting their answers in an Excel spreadsheet, and then they meet in chats to discuss their differences. When they can’t resolve a question, they invite me into chat. This week a student introduced me to Google docs, and I was swept off my feet by the way this tool could be used in my class. I love it! I created a video on the fly on Thursday to illustrate how to create a spreadsheet and share it with other group members. I may be the last to the party on this tool, but in case some of you aren’t aware of it, I am posting the video.

http://users.business.uconn.edu/adunbar/videos/GoogleDocs/GoogleDocs.html 
 

If anyone wants the “quiz” that the students worked, send me an email (not AECM), and I will send you the file.

Amy

Amy Dunbar
University of Connecticut School of Business
Department of Accounting
2100 Hillside Road Unit 1041 Storrs, CT 06269-1041  

amy.dunbar@business.uconn.ed 

January 7, 2010 reply from Richard Campbell

Techsmith's Jing is free (ad supported) and Jing Pro is almost free ($20 per year) www.jing.com  The Jing files can be imported into Camtasia for editing.

Techsmith's Hosting service www.screencast.com  is free (limited bandwidth and storage) and Screencast Pro is about $100 per year. Much more st, orage and ad free.

January 8, 2010 reply from Richard Campbell

Techsmith has a channel on youtube with a lot of education-focused videos --- http://www.youtube.com/user/ChannelTechSmith 

Educators get special pricing on Camtasia - around $150 instead of $300 --- http://www.techsmith.com/community/education/ 

Richard J. Campbell
mailto:campbell@rio.edu

 


Three ways to save video from the Internet ---
http://reviews.cnet.com/4520-11327_7-6555399-1.html?tag=rb_content
Also see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Youtube

An Absolute Must Read for Educators
One of the most exciting things I took away from the 2010 AAA Annual Meetings in San Francisco is a hard copy handout entitled "Expanding Your Classroom with Video Technology and Social Media," by Mark Holtzblatt and Norbert Tschakert. Mark later sent me a copy of this handout and permission to serve it up to you at
http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/temp/Video-Expanding_Your_Classroom_CTLA_2010.pdf

This is an exciting listing to over 100 video clips and full-feature videos that might be excellent resources for your courses, for your research, and for your scholarship in general. Included are videos on resources and useful tips for video projects as well as free online communication tools.

My thanks to Professors Holtzblatt and Tschakert for this tremendous body of work that they are now sharing with us.


Audio Capturing Without a Microphone When Recording Parts of Camtasia videos
Note that in the video below, the explanation begins 1:10 (70 seconds) into the video at the top of this Camtasia helper page ---
http://www.techsmith.com/learn/camtas... 
.
The above video explains how to record some audio in Camtasia without having to run that audio through a microphone such as when you want to embed part of a YouTube video in your Camtasia video.

Note that this may not work in Windows XP systems. In days of old some of my my embedded clips of video had poor sound quality due to having to hold my microphone near the speakers. Of course it was possible to edit in avi clips recorded on other capture software, but this was a pain.

Over the years this has been my major complaint with Camtasia video recording. Windows 7 users can now more easily work around the problem.

Also note this has never been a problem in Camtasia video recording on a Mac.

Here's a link that provides other tips on how to improve audio quality in Camtasia videos
http://download.techsmith.com/camtasiastudio/docs/onlinehelp/enu/700/Get_Great_Sound_with_Camtasia_Studio_7.pdf

December 7, 2010 message from Mike Curtis

Mike Curtis, an employee of TechSmith, replied to Audio Without a Microphone in Camtasia Studio?, a question about TechSmith.
Good news! As someone who had to explain how to "trick" Windows or provide various levels of work-arounds if one wanted to record their system audio (sound from the speakers) I was so excited when CS version 7.0 made it easy. Check out the 1:10 section of this video:
http://www.techsmith.com/learn/camtas.. 

If you have Windows XP though, you may still have issues and have to do it "the old way" depending on your sound card.

Camtasia for Mac also makes it easy to capture system audio.

 


Bob Jensen's Codec Saga: How I Lost a Big Part of My Life's Work
Until My Friend Rick Lillie Solved My Problem
Bob Jensen at Trinity University

The full essay below is on the Web at
http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/VideoCodecProblems.htm

There are many newer 64-bit Windows 7 computers that will not playback videos compressed on computers such as my 32-bit Windows XP computer. Give your 64-bit computer a test. The most popular video I ever produced is my 133ex05a.wmv video that's still being downloaded by thousands of security analysts and auditors. Even before I purchased a new computer I was getting complaints that this video would not play on 64-bit Windows 7 computers.

Give your computer test by trying to playback the 133ex05a.wmv video at
http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/acct5341/

Playback problems are also arising in videos created by millions of people other than me, especially Camtasia videos produced on 32-bit computers. The trouble is that Microsoft's set of codecs embedded in Windows 7 leaves out some important codecs in earlier versions of Windows.Many high level tech support groups still don't know how to solve this problem. For example, two days ago three Level 2 experts in the Dell Technical Support Division did not have a clue on how to solve the problem. Even though the video above would not run on my various video players such as Windows Media Player, VLC Player, Realtime, and Quicktime, Dell Level 2 technicians suggested I try three other players. None of these players corrected my problem.

Codec --- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Codec
Warning: There are many outfits on the Web that offer free or fee downloads of codecs. Don't trust any of them unless somebody you really trust informs you that these downloads are safe. Many of codec downloads carry malware malicious code that will put such things as Trojan horse viruses into your computer. One outfit even claims to playback virtually all videos without using a codec. I don't trust this company enough to even try its download. Quite a few people have downloaded the K-Lite Codec Pack, but my Sophos Security blocker would not allow this download. Friends who have the K-Lite does tell me that they still can't run many older videos in 64-bit machines that will run in 32-bit computers.

To make a long story short, a technical support expert named Ian at California State University in San Bernardino proposed a solution to the problem at the behest of my good friend and education technology expert Professor Rick Lillie.

On Thanksgiving Day Rick sent the following recommendation:

The problem is specifically an audio codec that did not come with Windows 7. Ian found a trustworthy place which provides that particular codec:
http://www.voiceage.com/acelp_eval_eula.php

Trinity University requires that I honor a relatively tough Cisco Systems security barrier called Sophos if I want to run my files on servers at Trinity. The VoiceAge download mentioned above not only passed through my Sophos barrier, unlike the K-Lite Codec Pack, the download took place in the blink of an eye.

Now old videos play wonderfully on my new 64-bit Windows 7 laptop from Dell. However, this is a limited solution in that users around the world who do not know about this solution or an equivalent solution will either not be able to run many old videos or they will be clogging my email box. I am asking that all of you inform your tech support group about this solution. I informed the Dell Support Group.

A better solution for my hundreds of videos still being served up on the Web would take weeks of my time. Windows 7 OS 64-bit computers will play my huge uncompressed avi files that I store in my barn. It is out of the question to serve up enormous avi files that can be compressed into files that save over 90% of of storage and transmission size. However, I did experiment with recompressing a couple of avi files on my 64-bit machine. These files will playback in wmv, rm, swf, and mov formats using only Windows 7 codecs. But at this stage of my life I don't want to spend weeks of my time solving a problem that Microsoft could solve with little cost or trouble.

Why compress raw avi videos into compressed wmv, mov, mpg, rm, scf, or some other compressed versions?

Continued in the full essay at
http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/VideoCodecProblems.htm


 


myMISlab is a web-based tutorial tool

I generally avoid posting advertisements unless I think a large number of readers have a particular interest in the product or service.

Pearson's myMISlab is a web-based tutorial tool that integrates business applications with Microsoft Office—including Excel, Access, and SharePoint — http://www.mymislab.com/tt_training.asp

Jensen Comment
When I taught AIS or MIS, I always insisted that student learn how to use MS Access so they better understand relational database systems. myMISlab could be greatly improved with tutorials for MS Access, although such tutorials are widely available elsewhere, including in the MS Access software itself. I provide ree video helpers for MS Access at http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/acct5342/

PQQ stands for Possible Quiz Question material.


At Long Last:  Camtasia for a Mac --- http://visuallounge.techsmith.com/
I love Camtasia for Windows --- http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/Tutorials/

 


Illustration of a Great Tutorial Site That Relies Heavily on Camtasia videos ---
http://www.bionicturtle.com/

April 26, 2010 message from Richard Campbell [campbell@RIO.EDU]

David Harper has built an excellent site providing study materials for finance certification exams. He relies heavily on Camtasia videos.

http://www.bionicturtle.com/
 
Richard J. Campbell
mailto:campbell@rio.edu

Here's a free sample (recommended by Amy Dunbar).
"How to use Excel’s LINEST() function to return multivariate regression - 10 min. screencast," by David Harper, Bionic Turtle, April 28, 2010 ---
http://www.bionicturtle.com/learn/article/how_to_use_excels_linest_function_to_return_multivariate_regression_10_min_/

Scroll down to watch the Camtasia video

Bob Jensen's Free Accounting Tutorials Using Camtasia Videos ---
http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/acct5342/
 

It’s amazingly easy to use Camtasia Studio from TechSmith ---
http://www.techsmith.com/

 


SmartPen --- http://www.livescribe.com/smartpen/index.html

How To Pencast Demos --- http://math247.pbworks.com/How-to-embed-a-pencast-into-a-PBWiki-page

LiveScribe Featured Files ---
http://www.livescribe.com/cgi-bin/WebObjects/LDApp.woa/wa/CommunityOverviewPage

Note the file on carbon bonding (as an illustration) ---
http://www.livescribe.com/cgi-bin/WebObjects/LDApp.woa/wa/MLSOverviewPage?sid=vnVdHtpPCGdL

Watch a Pencast video of simple algebra --- http://www.pencasts.org/blog/?p=32

Jing (but not Jing Pro) is free software for recording video from your computer screen such as SmartPen movements with capturing of your audio narrations --- http://www.techsmith.com/
Scroll your pointer over the left side to see product links (including Jing).

Screencast from TechSmith offers a limited amount of free space for storing and serving up your videos to the world ---
http://www.techsmith.com/
More space requires monthly rental fees.

 


Free Podcast Software

August 21, 2009 message from Rick Lillie [rlillie@CSUSB.EDU]

Hi Amy,

Do a Google search for “free podcasting software.”  You will discover a lot of free software programs that can produce podcast file formats.  Use the links below to learn more about podcasting and what it can do for course materials.

When you ask this question, you are sure to get a lot of different answers.  People who use podcasting as a way to share information tend to have a favorite software program.  The key to selecting a software program is to know upfront what you want to do with your recording (e.g., How do you want to share the recording?  Do you want the recording public or private?  Do you want students to download the recording and keep it?  Do you want students to only listen/view but not keep the file?).

Tablet PC computers are similar but quite different.  I use an IBM ThinkPad X61.  The “inking” technology works extremely well with the tablet’s features.  It has a fast processor, lots of RAM memory, and tons of disk space.  I have not found any multimedia software that did not perform well on the ThinkPad X61.  This is not the case with all brands of Tablet PCs.

During my 2009 CTLA presentation, I mentioned a great, inexpensive program called “PDF Annotator” (http://www.ograhl.com/en/pdfannotator/) that makes it possible to annotate and markup and create PDF files in ways that Adobe Acrobat Pro does not include.  I use PDF Annotator to grade papers and create graphics. 

VoiceThread (http://www.voicethread.com) is a hosted Web 2.0 service.  You do not need to upload the file before it can be accessed.  Uploading is done automatically for you by VoiceThread.  You create your presentation.  VoiceThread stores the file on its servers and then gives you a URL link to the file.  You can share the URL link with students.  Students can listen/view the presentation so long as they have internet access.  As I mentioned at my 2009 CTLA presentation, VoiceThread produces similar results to Camtasia, but does it in a different way, and in my opinion, is much easier to use.  Again, some people like Camtasia.  Some people prefer VoiceThread.

TokBox (http://www.tokbox.com) is a free, hosted Web 2.0 service similar to VoiceThread.  With TokBox, you can create a video message of up to 10 minutes in length.  A 10 minute streaming video is a “long” video for educational purposes.  TokBox gives you a URL to the video message that you can share with others.  TokBox also gives you html code that you can use to embed a player in a web page.  At 2009 CTLA, I explained how I embed a TokBox video message in a class assignments schedule.  I do this when I feel that a video commentary will provide a warmer connection with my students than printed text.

Uploading a file, whether MP3 or MP4 (or other file format) may be a little tricky depending upon the size of the file.  This is where “hosted” files make the creation/sharing process easier to use.  Be careful with using free hosting services, since many of them are always open to the world (i.e., “public”).  Do you really want your materials available to the “public?”  Sometimes, “public” files include material that may create a copyright issue.  Just be careful to consider these issues.

Hope this helps.

Rick Lillie
CalState San Bernardino

Email:  rlillie@csusb.edu

THREE RESOURCES FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION

#1:  Podcasting in Plain English:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y-MSL42NV3c

#2:  About Audacity:  http://audacity.sourceforge.net/about/

#3:  Comparison of MP3 and MP4 file formats:  http://www.diffen.com/difference/Mp3_vs_Mp4

 


YouTubeMP3
From the Scout Report on August 14, 2009

Free YouTube to MP3 Converter 3.2.1.58 ---  
http://www.dvdvideosoft.com/free-dvd-video-software-download.htm

If you've ever wanted to just listen to a particular YouTube video at your leisure as a mp3 file, this application may be just the thing. Visitors simply need to install the program and drop the YouTube URLs in question into a box. The application will convert the files into the mp3 format. This version is compatible with computers running Windows XP or Vista.

Jensen Comment
I tried this and my first saved file was a  MP3 file of Les Paul and Mary Ford
The full video file on YouTube is at
World is Waiting for the Sunrise --- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7iGXP_UBog4 

I pasted the above URL into the converter program and saved it to my hard drive as a MP3 file.
It saved as a 3,132 Kb compressed audio file that you can listen to at
http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/temp/LesPaulWaitingForSunrise.mp3

It's neat the way the program can download in background from YouTube. This way you can start a download and then go about your business in other software. Your computer will give a tiny bleep when the download is finished. If you then download another file, be sure to first change the "Output" file name so as to not write over the previous download file.

A clear advantage to saving YouTube audio or video is that these links come and go on YouTube all the time. The above link to the Les Paul and Mary Ford video might even have been removed between now and when I pasted the above link into this document. But my MP3 recording is now subject to my control, although care must be taken with respect to copyrights. I assumed that this demo will not upset anybody. U.C. Berkeley and other universities who put full length lectures and courses on YouTube encourage users to download the audio or video files (the video takes up an enormous amount of file space).

Another advantage is that you easily edit the MP3 file and/or make clipped portions to be saved as other audio files. For example, a six-minute clip might be saved from a 75-minute YouTube lecture from MIT.

I was amazed at the ease with which YouTube audio can be captured and saved as a file on my hard drive. When it’s audio that’s more important than video of a talking head or unneeded viewing of music performers, there is a great savings in storage requirements for audio files versus video files. This includes the wasted space of talking heads in videos and the desire to hear music without necessarily always having to watch it performed while you are playing it in background.


Librarian Pro 1.4.4 --- http://www.koingosw.com/products/librarianpro.php 

This application is a nice way to create an organized and cross-referenced catalog for books, movies, and music. Visitors can keep track of loaned material, and they can easily import detailed cataloging information from popular sites like Amazon. Also, the application allows users to export these lists onto iPod and other such devices. This version can be used for fifteen days at no cost, and it is compatible with computers running Windows XP and newer and those running Max OS X 10.4 and newer.


"On Its Third Try, Microsoft Finally Gets the Video Editor Right," by Rob Pegoraro, The Washington Post, August 30, 2009 --- Click Here

Microsoft has a sometimes-undeserved reputation for needing three tries to get a product right, but in the case of Windows Movie Maker that description seems fair.

Movie Maker began life as a largely ignored part of Windows Millennium Edition and wasn't much better when XP arrived -- it couldn't even burn a DVD of your footage, instead limiting you to a proprietary, soon-abandoned multimedia disc format. Its Windows Vista incarnation added DVD output but offered little help with publishing videos online.

But Microsoft's new Windows Live Movie Maker ( http://download.live.com/moviemaker ) represents a genuine advance. The barely changed name understates how little this program -- a free download for Windows Vista and its upcoming replacement, Windows 7, but not Windows XP -- shares with older Movie Maker releases. It leaves out some features of its predecessors, incorporates a rewritten interface and adds a far more useful set of video-sharing options.

It also has a few bugs -- but they're nothing Microsoft can't fix in a maintenance release or three.

Live Movie Maker's installation experience, unfortunately, ranks among them. Getting this program requires downloading a Windows Live Installer setup utility that comes preset to install Microsoft's entire suite of Live software -- nine applications on a Vista laptop. Unless you opt out, installing Movie Maker will also switch your browser's search engine to Microsoft's Bing (a decent alternative to Google) and change its home page to MSN.com ( a decent way to remember how bad "portal sites" looked in 1999).

Movie Maker's installer didn't remove an old version of the program on that Vista laptop, but at least nobody will confuse the two. Where the prior release employs a conventional menu-and-toolbar interface, Live Movie Maker adopts the "ribbon" style of Microsoft's Office 2007, in which one large toolbar reveals different functions as you select tabs -- Home, Animations, Visual Effects and so on -- at the top of the window.

Many Office 2007 users say they hate the ribbon, but here it seems to work, presenting the program's features in manageable subsets.

Live Movie Maker can open video clips and photos already saved on your computer, or you can use Windows Live Photo Galley -- installed alongside Live Movie Maker even if you select only the video editor -- to import them from a camera or camcorder.

Microsoft advertises that in Windows 7, you will also be able to grab video from a Flip camcorder or an iPhone, but I had no problem pulling in clips from a Flip UltraHD and an iPhone 3GS in Vista. Yet on a computer running an almost-final version of 7, I couldn't play footage from either device, apparently because of a conflict with a Pinnacle digital TV program.

Live Movie Maker presents these clips as a series of thumbnails of varying length. You can flip any of them 90 degrees (helpful if you held a digital camera on its side when recording video), easily split or trim them, and rearrange their order before adding title screens, captions, closing credits and any of dozens of Hollywood-style transitions. If you're assembling a slideshow, you can apply fancy visual treatments and Ken Burns-style panning effects to your photos. And you can pick out a soundtrack, then have the program adjust the movie's duration to match the music's play time.

If you're in a hurry, you can just pick a song and click the AutoMovie button to have Live Movie Maker do the rest of the work for you.

But unlike older Movie Maker releases, this version doesn't record voice-over narrations. And unlike such non-free video editors as Apple's iMovie, it can't sharpen a grainy shot or stabilize a jittery clip.

Continued in article

Jensen Comment
It still doesn’t beat grapefruit.


Internet users can view video either as video file downloads (that may or may not be stored on a hard drive) or as streaming video (that does not entail downloading a media file but can be captured with streaming media software).

Update from the AAA Accounting Commons --- http://commons.aaahq.org/pages/home
I thank Rick for sharing his expertise in the new VoiceThread multimedia education and communication technology.
Accounting Professor Rick Lillie Uses VoiceThread to Create Streaming Video --- http://iaed.wordpress.com/
 

If you have not yet discovered VoiceThread, I strongly recommend that you click on the link below and explore the VoiceThread website. You are in for a real technology treat!

CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE VOICETHREAD WEBSITE

I use VoiceThread to create streaming video lectures, to create tutorials explaining how to solve problems, to explain answers to quiz and examination questions, and more. VoiceThread is easy to use, is similar to PowerPoint (but much more robust), and is web-hosted which makes it easy for you to share VoiceThread presentations with your students and colleagues.

During a presentation that I gave at the recent 2008 American Accounting Association (AAA) Annual Meeting in Anaheim, California, I talked about VoiceThread. To help participants to see how easy it is to create and share dynamic presentations with VoiceThread, I put together a short presentation that explains how to use VoiceThread. Click on the link below to view the short tutorial program.

 

I encourage you to sign up for a free account.  Learn to use VoiceThread.  If you like what you create, then you can upgrade to the “Pro” version, which is very inexpensive. To get the full benefit of using VoiceThread, you need a headset/microphone and webcam.  To begin, use the tools included in VoiceThread. If you have questions about VoiceThread, use the “Contact Me” option on the right side of the screen.  Send me a message.  Include your email and/or telephone number.  I will be happy to work with you.

Enjoy!
Rick Lillie


Jensen Comment
VoiceThread has an advantage in allowing a community of users to comment (in multimedia) comments on an instructional video.
It's drawback is that it uses a lot of storage and bandwidth for talking heads.

Some VoiceThread pricing information is given at http://voicethread.com/pricing/pro/
It is possible to get small amounts of video file storage free, but it can get really expensive when the community goes on and on with long commentaries.
In the pro version, file sizes are limited to 100 Mb. This is about one tenth the size of a 10 minute YouTube video. YouTube generally limits file sizes to 1 Gb or 10 minutes of compressed video such as mpg compression --- http://www.google.com/support/youtube/bin/answer.py?hlrm=en&answer=57924
Colleges can stream much larger videos on YouTube such as the courses that UC Berkeley makes available on YouTube with over one hour of video for each lecture in a course.

VoiceThread makes it possible to have somewhat longer videos in a 100 Mb file by using small video screens. Note how Rick does this at http://voicethread.com/#q.b173180.i923368

YouTube also allows any users to comment in text format such that commentaries can accompany videos on YouTube. The huge advantage of YouTube is that videos can be uploaded, viewed, and even downloaded for free. VoiceThread, for an annual fee, has more features.

Although I've not tried VoiceThread, it would seem that cost and file size limits make this less attractive than YouTube.

Other video streaming alternatives are summarized at http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/thetools.htm#StreamingMedia

Camtasia users should note that TechSmith will serve up streaming videos in a utility called ScreenCast --- http://www.techsmith.com/screencast.asp

You can read the following at http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/thetools.htm#StreamingMedia

However, in most instances open sharing videos are streaming (using the term loosely here) videos for which there is no file to download. In that case the video must be captured in total or in part by software designed for such purposes. The software I like for video capturing is called Camtasia Recorder --- http://www.techsmith.com/camtasia/record.asp
Also see http://www.techsmith.com/camtasia/education.asp
This is cheaper alternative than many more specialized products for streaming video capture. You can download my PowerPoint file about Camtasia at http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/EdTech/PowerPoint/
Links to examples are given in this slide show.

 

Other streaming media alternatives are summarized at http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/thetools.htm#StreamingMedia


Advanced video production for your touch screen computer or mobile---
Http://www.touchcast.com
Thank you Richard Campbell for the heads up on March 22, 2014.

So if you have an IPad, go to the above link to view their sample content.
Also you can download the free app to create content on your IPad.

 


From the Scout Report on August 7, 2009

HardCopy Pro 3.0.11  --- http://www.desksoft.com/HardCopy.htm 

HardCopyPro is a screen-capture tool, but it has some nice bells and whistles that make it worth a closer look. Visitors can use the tabbed dialog box interface to pick images or even capture images at set time intervals. Also, users can preset the program to capture a certain rectangle, window, full screen, or even the window located under the mouse cursor. This version is free for 30 days, and it is compatible with computers running Windows 95 and newer.

Statement from the Company
 HardCopy Pro is the professional, easy to use screen capture utility for Windows. It can capture rectangular screen areas and whole windows. The captured images can be cropped very easily and the color depth can be changed to any desired value from monochrome to true color. Images can be printed, saved, copied to the clipboard, emailed, edited with any image editing program, etc. Many options allow the customization of all these actions to individual user needs.

Jensen Comment
I downloaded this (temporarily free) program by clicking on Downloads and then choosing HardCopy Pro. I first saved the zip file in a Temp folder and then unzipped the file under Program Files.
The download link is at http://www.desksoft.com/HardCopy_Download.htm

The free download version only lasts 30 days, but you can purchase the software for $20 such that there’s no big investment here if you like the program. After about 20 days of playing around with this I will probably buy the software for $20.

I also Camtasia Producer  ( http://www.techsmith.com/  )  to capture video screens. But Camtasia is more expensive, has no timer, and I’ve never been able to get it to work for streaming video (YouTube) as opposed to video files such as mpg or wmv files. I am not, however, using the latest version of Camtasia.

HardCopy Pro will not copy video screens and save them to picture files. Nor will it capture "rolling screens" that must be scrolled to see the full document or spreadsheet.

I also use Camtasia SnagIt ( http://www.techsmith.com/  ) for screen captures. One advantage of SnagIt is that it will capture rolling screens such as a text document or spreadsheet that will not all fit on one screen. But I’ve not had any success using SnagIt to capture video of any kind. SnagIt seems to capture the screen but will not save it as a picture file that I can edit. However, I’m not running the latest version of SnagIt.

Bob Jensen


August 31, 2008 reply from Rick Lillie at the AAA Accounting Commons --- http://commons.aaahq.org/pages/home

Hi Bob,

Thank you for your comments about VoiceThread.  I would like to expand on several points that you raised.

Regarding the way VoiceThread works

VoiceThread is a hosted service that can be used in a variety of ways.  For example, VoiceThread may be used to create

Currently, VoiceThread is offered in both free and low-fee options.  The pricing screen needs a little more explanation.

Pros vs Cons of VoiceThread

IN CLOSING

There are lots of ways to create rich-media instructional materials.  I use them extensively in my accounting courses.

Personally, I do not like Camtasia, Adobe Presenter, Camtasia Recorder and similar software programs.  For me, these programs are too complex to use.  I like processes to be as simple as possible.  This is why I prefer VoiceThread.

VoiceThread allows me to focus on creating the slides, pictures (jpeg files), Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) files, etc., that I want to include in a streaming presentation.  VoiceThread makes it easy to go from slides to streaming video with embedded commentary.  VoiceThread saves the file and gives me a URL to the program or the html code for embedding a player into course materials.

The overall process is simple and easy to use.

Many accounting faculty that I have talked with seem hesitant to include technology in their courses and to use technology tools when creating course materials.  When I find something that will make life easier, I share the information.

Thank you for your comments.  I enjoy this type of discussion.

Best wishes,

Rick Lillie

August 31,  2008 reply from Bob Jensen at the AAA Accounting Commons --- http://commons.aaahq.org/pages/home

Hi Rick,

I  really appreciate your detailed elaboration on video creation alternatives. Thank you so much! Please keep them coming at the AAA Commons. You obviously have unique technology skills.

The one area where I disagree with you is on Camtasia. I personally learned how to use Camtasia in less than an hour and then recorded many technical videos for my students to use outside the classroom. It cut down on the traffic through my office door by about 95% from students who just did follow the technical details in class. More importantly these videos (especially the ones about MS Access technicalities) helped me explain things that I forgot how to do over time. Examples of my Camtasia videos can be found at the following links:

ACCT 5342 (AIS videos) --- http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/acct5342/

ACCT 5341 (Accounting Theory videos) at http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/acct5341/ 

I even prepared a tutorial on how to record (capture) computer image videos and produce (compress) them into smaller files for storage and delivery --- http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/Tutorials/
(I suggest clicking on the CamtasiaTutorial.wmv file)

I hope accounting professors and students will not be scared away from Camtasia before even trying it out. A limited and free version may be attempted first. It is called Jing --- http://www.jingproject.com/ 

But an even better suggestion is to download Camtasia Studio itself on a free trial basis --- http://www.jingproject.com/ 

Another interesting product from TechSmith is called UserView. Suppose a student is located somewhere else in the world. UserView allows a professor to both see and record what is happening on a student's computer screen such that the professor can analyze the moves and suggest to the student how to do something better. Similarly, the student can see what is happening on a professor's computer while he/she narrates.  Good stuff --- http://www.techsmith.com/uservue.asp 

But for me, the best thing since grapefruit is Camtasia Studio for producing videos for my own servers, YouTube, and possibly even VoiceThread. For YouTube I suggest choosing mpg compressions after recording a wmv video.

Bob Jensen's video helpers are at http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideos.htm

Thanks Rick,

Bob Jensen

 


Excel Helpers


"How to Maximize Excel's Recent Items Menu," AccountingWeb, August 2013 (registration required) ---
http://www.accountingweb.com/article/how-maximize-excels-recent-items-menu/222214?source=technology

Excel guru David Ringstrom is back with another informative article about how to streamline the process of accessing recent spreadsheets. He explains the process not for just one version of Excel, but for Excel 2003, 2007, 2010, and 2013. Also in today's news is coverage of the 2013 Family Office Exchange's recent survey – Benchmarking: Technology in the Family Office. Single and multifamily offices were surveyed on their technology practices, including their software selections, security, budgeting, staffing, and use of Cloud computing.

 

 


"The First 8 Excel Tricks You Have To Learn On The Way To Becoming A Master," by Walter Hickey, Business Insider, July 10, 2013 ---
http://www.businessinsider.com/excel-countif-sum-functions-if-sumproduct-dollar-sign-2013-7

"How To Use Index/Match, The One Microsoft Excel Trick That Separates The Gurus From The Interns," by Walter Hickey, Business Insider, July 11, 2013 ---
http://www.businessinsider.com/excel-index-match-2013-7 

We've been writing a lot about Microsoft Excel formulas.

The program is the gold standard of programs. It's elegant, ubiquitous, and outstandingly powerful.

American business lives and dies by the spreadsheet, and everyone is always looking to hone their skills.

There's one trick, though, that separates the quants from the interns.

That trick is Index/Match, a function that can find any value in any spreadsheet.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/excel-index-match-2013-7?op=1#ixzz2Ypc1HDwB

Continued in article

Bob Jensen's Excel helpers ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideos.htm

 


"The Risk of Using Spreadsheets for Statistical Analysis," CFO.com Whitepaper, 2012 ---
http://www.cfo.com/whitepapers/index.cfm/displaywhitepaper/14668959?mid=107705&rid=107705.59400.30390

Abstract:
While spreadsheets are widely used for statistical analysis, they are useful only to a certain point. When used for a task they?re not designed to perform, or for a task beyond the limit of their capabilities, using spreadsheets can be risky. Read this paper to learn about more powerful yet easy-to-use analytics alternatives that may be more suitable.

Bob Jensen's sadly neglected Excel tutorials ---
See Below


Interactive Mulitmedia Excel Files on the Web

Richard Campbell's Interactive Invoice --- http://faculty.rio.edu/campbell/gp10_windows/engage.html

I thank Richard for showing us how to add online interactive hotspots to a picture. This is part of the way toward interaction. A file may become more fully interactive if it is an Excel file rather than just a picture or a non-interactive video.

Since your computer can be set to download Excel files into your Web browser for security purposes, it is possible to download Excel files with interactive hot spots. In addition, numbers can be changed such that there is calculation interaction as well. Such calculation interaction is not available in pictures.

I illustrate an interactive multimedia Excel file at http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/ExcelMediaIllustrations/Example01.xls
This will download very slowly because of the media files linked in the Excel file are also being downloaded.

The steps I follow when making interactive multimedia Excel files are as follows:

  1. Prepare an Excel spreadsheet
  2. Add Web links and make them active
  3. Decide where to place audio clips
  4. Record each audio clip as a wav file (I use the free Audacity software) --- http://audacity.sourceforge.net/
    I save these files in the same folder as the Excel spreadsheet
  5. In Excel click on (Insert, Object) and choose Media Clip
    Then choose (Insert Media File, Sound) and find the appropriate wav file
  6. You can also insert video clips (I record these in Camtasia)

Note that you can compress wav audio files into mp3 files and avi video files into whatever format you choose such as wmv, mov, or mpg. Adding any media to an Excel spreadsheet makes downloading slower. Media file compression, however, speeds up the process greatly if you have long media clips in your spreadsheet.

There are of course other files that you can add to Excel such as pictures.

Any downloaded MS Office file loses macro functionality in a Web browser, so you might want to avoid using macros in your Excel file.

It is also possible to add DHTML dynamic interactions to Excel files. This adds an immense amount of code to your file, and the DHTML code cannot be read on all types of browsers. I have a video on how to do DHTML interaction in Excel at http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/acct5342/ExcelDHTML.wmv
However, I don't view this rather complex procedure important since it became possible to read downloaded Excel files directly into a Web browser and thereby avoid many of the security risks of running Excel files in Excel itself.

Bob Jensen's threads on tricks and tools of the trade are at http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/thetools.htm

 


Questions
How can you turn your email messages into free video messages?
How can you video conference calls?

For those of you in the American Accounting Association, I call your attention to a new Teaching Resource called TokBox submitted to the Commons by accounting professor Rick Little. You do not need to go to the Commons for some of Rick’s links passed on below. I thank Rick for sharing this teaching resource.

 AAA Members

Please go to the AAA Commons at least once each day --- http://commons.aaahq.org
For Teaching and Research Resources, Click on the menu bar item called “Roles”
Rick’s posting is called “Thinking Outside the Box”
You might want to clidk on Rick’s picture to see his interesting profile (e.g., with Grant Thornton and as a local CPA before getting his PhD in accounting)

 

Links for Non-Members

Rick’s TokBox Blog is at http://iaed.wordpress.com/2008/08/19/using-tokbox-to-communicate-with-your-students/

Rick’s introductory video is at http://www.tokbox.com/vm/b056ued8rnau#vmail=b056ued8rnau

The TokBox homepage is at http://www.tokbox.com/#

Tokbox is a free service that lets you talk with your friends over live video. Here's how it works: you sign up and we give you a link. When you want to talk with anyone, just give them the link - they click and you chat.

This is an innovative idea for conferencing, letting your parents see their grandchildren, and motivating students. From a societal standpoint it may be a waste of bandwidth for sending videos of talking heads across the Internet.

 


YouTube versus Viddler versus Other Online Video Sources

July 19, 2008 message from Richard J. Campbell mailto:campbell@rio.edu

Although youtube has a huge "market share", the quality of videos are degraded by the compression techniques that they use. Below is a link to a demo of another, better-quality site.

http://www.viddler.com/learn-more/ 

Richard J. Campbell
 mailto:campbell@rio.edu

July 20, 2008 reply from Bob Jensen

Hi Richard,

Thank you for the Viddler link. I looked into this a bit and discovered that Viddler is more for the short home movies. As you know as well or better than me, video file compression is essential to making online video work well, especially since online video is beginning to clog the Internet. If I were an Internet czar I would ban uncompressed video.

Internet Gridlock Video is clogging the Internet
Video downloads are sucking up bandwidth at an unprecedented rate. A short magazine article might take six minutes to read online. Watching "The Evolution of Dance" also takes six minutes--but it requires you to download 100 times as much data. "The Evolution of Dance" alone has sent the equivalent of 250,000 DVDs' worth of data across the Internet.
"Internet Gridlock Video is clogging the Internet.: How we choose to unclog it will have far-reaching implications," by Larry Hardesty, MIT's Technology Review, July/August 2008 --- http://www.technologyreview.com/Infotech/20919/?nlid=1172&a=f

Uncompressed Viddler videos only run for a max of about a minute. This makes Viddler unsuitable for training and education tutorials and full lectures relative to YouTube where videos in mpg compression can run up to ten minutes each video we upload. YouTube also lets colleges put up entire lectures from universities. For example, one of UC Berkeley's YouTube lectures in physics that runs 1.25 hours is at http://snipurl.com/ucp01  [www_youtube_com] 

It would be absurd to put entire courses or even longer tutorials up in uncompressed video. Compression of a video can save upwards of 90% of the file space required for storage and uploading and downloading --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideos.htm#Video

File size is limited on Viddler to 500 Mb in contrast to YouTube’s one Gb limit (usually uploaded in mpg compression) which gives about 10 minutes of viewing at 640 x 480 resolution on YouTube for the general public. UC. Universities like UC Berkeley that put lots of free courses on YouTube must be making special arrangements to have file sizes of 10 GB or more per lesson.

The allowed video time on Viddler is just not good for tutorials. By way of illustration, compare the following tutorials in math and especially compare the image quality versus the running time versus the loading time:

You can view YouTube videos in full screen mode using one button on the bottom left. Viddler videos can also be viewed in full screen by first clicking on the menu button on the bottom left and then choosing the full screen option

Viddler --- http://www.viddler.com/
YouTube --- http://www.youtube.com/

Bob Jensen's video helpers --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideos.htm#Video

Bob Jensen's guide to free video lectures --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI

BigThink:  YouTube for Scholars (where intellectuals may post their lectures on societal issues) --- http://www.bigthink.com/

TED:  Technology, Entertainment, and Design Lectures --- http://www.ted.com/

Open Science Directory --- http://www.opensciencedirectory.net/

Free Feature Length Documentary Films --- http://www.snagfilms.com/ 

The Visual Dictionary --- http://www.infovisual.info/

 


Bob Jensen's Tips on Capturing and Presenting Online Video Lessons

June 30, 2008 message from Glen L Gray [glen.gray@CSUN.EDU]

I have philosophical questions regarding online tutoring.

I just returned from the 3-day AIS Educators Conference in Colorado. While there, I participated in a 1-hours hands-on session on using Camtasia to create on-line tutorial materials. I was impressed with the program's ability to produce the materials--and produce almost any output format.

Here are my questions:

My core IS class meets twice a week for 15 weeks. So, we have 30 75-class meetings. About 6 (20%) of those class meetings are used to explain how to do 3 hands-on projects. So, lets say I put all the material for those 6 classes online using Camtasia, then do I do about the 6 class meetings that I free up?

If fill those 6 class meetings with more stuff (2 more chapters or other readings), it seems that one could argue that I have expanded by class to the equivalent of 18 weeks (15 weeks of in-class meetings plus 3 weeks of online class "meetings").

The opposite approach would be to not have the 6 in-class meetings at all because I now have 6 online class meetings. But what would my chair and/dean think of this? Or will it be easy to convince them that this approach (not having 6 in-class meetings) is a move toward online courses, which is a goal of our university?

Glen L. Gray, PhD, CPA Accounting & Information Systems, COBAE California State University, Northridge 18111 Nordhoff ST Northridge, CA 91330-8372 818.677.3948 818.677.2461 (messages)
http://www.csun.edu/~vcact00f

July 1, 2008 reply from Bob Jensen

Hi Glen,

So I don't forget while typing this, my best tip for Camtasia recording is to learn to use the Pause/Record options (in my case I toggle the F9 key). That way you can pause recording, take a break, prep for the next module, and then start to record again. Unless you tell the viewers that you paused, they won't even know you took a break.

I always used Camtasia modules for students to use outside of class. I rarely used these inside class unless it was something I might screw up live (especially when teaching some MS Access modules).

 Camtasia worked great in relieving student frustration about not understanding or remembering all aspects of a one-time presentation in class. It surely gave me more free time, because students had much less need to come to my office to get me to repeat something technical.

 I have many hours of Camtasia video that I recorded, much of which is no longer online. One thing you have to consider when you really get serious is that video, even when tightly compressed with Camtasia Producer, still takes a lot of storage space. Instructors seldom have such space on Blackboard or WebCT servers. Trinity was very generous with me with respect to Web server space, but I felt guilty about taking too much video storage advantage of this generosity. I was saved by my really good friends in the Computer Science Department who seemed to have no problems will providing me with video serving.

 For illustrative purposes you can also view the following modules online:
I suggest viewing the wmv compressed file extensions.

 ACCT 5342 (AIS) --- http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/acct5342/

 ACCT 5341 (Accounting Theory) --- http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/acct5341/

Some tutorials --- http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/Tutorials/

Where can Camtasia be improved?
I think the biggest improvement would be to capture audio from something other than a microphone in front of speakers. For example, for my technology road shows I like to capture video from online sources like TechSmith itself. That way I can easily show parts of longer video streams. The visual parts of video capturing video seem to work quite well but the audio capturing generally sucks. I wish Camtasia had an option for capturing video directly rather than through the speakers.

You can find some video capturing of video examples in some of my road show files at http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/EdTech/Video/
For example, note the Interactive Video module and the PodcastVodcast module.

Note the poor sound of my captured Techsmith videos. This illustrates how Camtasia could be improved with an option to record video internally without having to hold a microphone in front of the speakers.

Mostly we capture computer screens and narrate what we want to demo. When there is video of a talking head, don't sweat the lip sinking too much. To get lip sinking you have to capture at a very expensive (in terms of file size) frame capture rate. Camtasia allows you to increase this capture rate, but I highly, highly recommend sticking with the default capture rate. Lip sinking only matters in a 1955 Chevy at a drive-in movie.

Remember that my best tip for Camtasia recording is to learn to use the Pause/Record options (in my case I toggle the F9 key). That way you can pause recording, take a break, prep for the next module, and then start to record again. Unless you tell the viewers that you paused, they won't even know you took a break.

I have some tips on using Camtasia at http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideos.htm

Bob Jensen

 


Lecture Capture Technology and Copyright Problems

July 28, 2008 message from Richard Campbell [campbell@RIO.EDU]

Another "hat" I wear is a beta tester for Techsmith.

They have just announced another new product called "Camtasia Relay Server" which is designed to facilitate the recording of lectures and surveys, primarily by non-techies and seamlessly upload that lecture to a web server, for rendering and serving up. See:

http://www.techsmith.com/camtasiarelay/sign-up/ 

My main concern - as I told Techsmith - is if the server is owned by the University, who owns the intellectual property rights to the professors' lectures??

Richard J. Campbell
mailto:campbell@rio.edu 

 

July 28, 2008 reply from Bob Jensen

Hi Richard,

Copyright ownership rights vary from college to college. Some universities (I think South Dakota) even own the copyright to books that faculty write and all lectures. Other universities lay no claims to faculty creations except in the case of funded grants that significantly draw upon university resources such as science and medical labs. Generally colleges are more aggressive with faculty patents than they are with copyrights, but this varies greatly.

The place to start is the Faculty Handbook in your college or university which in most instances is now online (access may be restricted to faculty and staff). You might also check the student handbook regarding student rights to captured lectures, exams, etc. As Jagdish once pointed out to us, it’s not necessary that a copyright be registered for the “owner” of intellectual property to have copyright rights. It is wise to intellectual property right policy section of every syllabus.

The big issue is when students capture professors’ lectures (in video or audio) and then serve them up on any server (including YouTube). I suspect faculty or college administrators can actually sue students but this would probably be advised only when financial or health damages such as mental breakdown are substantial. Problems of having students capture and serve up lectures are as follows:

1 This is a form of plagiarism, but the lecturer or college itself must actually find that the lecture has been plagiarized and is being made available on some server. This in itself is difficult because the piece may keep popping up. For example, the same video of a Barbara Streisand singing “America” might appear on a dozen or more YouTube URLs. If notice is given to YouTube to cancel one URL, the video may appear on three new URLs the same day. Back where I grew up we just say “you can’t keep a prairie dog from poppin’ up in another hole and another and another and another and another.”
 

2. When there is a copyright violation (in hard copy or online) standard procedure is to request that the person cease and desist from making the material available. Generally this alone will make the violator cease and desist. The problem, however, is that hundreds of other users of the material by now may have their own copies and may themselves serve it up like an entire prairie dog colony in a pasture.

There’s a great deal of information about copyright infringement (including on YouTube) at http://www.howstuffworks.com/search.php?terms=copyright+violation&x=28&y=33

 

In terms of capturing lectures, Apple Corporation may give the Camtasia Relay Server a run for its money.

 

“Patent Filing Suggests Apple Is Exploring New Lecture-Capture Software,” by Jeffrey R. Young, Chronicle of Higher Education, July 28, 2008 --- http://chronicle.com/wiredcampus/article/3199/patent-filing-suggests-apple-is-exploring-new-lecture-capture-software

A patent application filed by an Apple employee details software that would capture video and slides from college lectures and automatically edit them into video podcasts.

The application, titled “Automatic Content Creation and Processing,” was unearthed this month by AppleInsider. The name on the patent application is Bertrand Serlet, Apple’s senior vice president of software engineering. An Apple spokesman could not be reached for comment Monday, but the company is notoriously tight-lipped about products that are still in development.

Apple already runs a free service called iTunes U that helps colleges around the country manage online offerings, and several companies sell software that helps capture lecture video and slides as well. One unusual feature described in the new patent application, though, is the ability to determine automatically when to run video footage of the professor speaking and when to splice in images of lecture slides. As the patent application puts it, the software would determine “a time to switch the first and second streams from the event data.”

Many college officials are looking for easy ways to record large numbers of lectures and offer video or audio recordings to students. The goal is to capture and distribute lecture podcasts without requiring professors or other staff members to perform time-consuming editing or file management.

 

Bob Jensen's helpers on copyright issues are at http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/theworry.htm#Copyright

 


 

          Camtasia 5

New Camtasia Version 5 Features

September 30, 2007 message from Richard Campbell [campbell@RIO.EDU

And here is the feature list of Camtasia's version 5:

I’ll have some demos of Camtasia version 5 output available soon.

FEATURE LIST:



RECORDER

*Simpler recording process

*Resizes applications

*Customizable recording toolbar: options to add markers and ScreenDraw



EDITING

Project settings -

*Gives you a real time preview of what your video will look like.

*Eg, you record at 1024x768, then set your project settings to Web.

It will scale your video to 640x480.



SmartFocus -

*Intelligently tracks activity on the screen and zooms in to keep

your viewers focused.

*We've also made Zoom n Pan a lot more flexible, so editing, adding

and removing zoom keyframes is way easier


Housekeeping -

*When saving a project, there's an option for copying or moving all

files associated with the project to a folder.

Transitions -

*New ones include: Fade through Black, Glow, Cube Rotate, Page Turn,

Peel, Roll


Callouts -

*We added a 3D edge effect to make the callouts standout more

Improved stability -

*Though its just one bullet item on here, about 1/3 of our

development effort has gone into shoring up the code, making it much

more stable and predictable

Editing at 30FPS -

*We've moved to a more standard, stable editing approach of 30 frames

per second editing. We initially followed Microsoft Movie Maker,

giving people the illusion of editing at 100ths of a second. But we

found that it actually confused people people, because we didn't have

100 frames per second. So now we've got 30 fps video and editing.

Nice and consistent and more stable.

 

 

No Multimedia Expertise Needed


 

Camtasia Tutorial Video:  How to make interactive Flash quizzes

October 31, 2007 message from Richard Campbell [campbell@RIO.EDU]

Below is a link to a movie about the above topic – SCORM is a protocol which dictates how a content authoring system interfaces with a learning management system like WebCT. You must have at least Camtasia version 4 to do this, but this movie was filmed in Camtasia version 5.

Not the controls in the lower right corner of the video – one toggles a popup menu, one goes full-screen and one info / copyright box.

http://www.virtualpublishing.net/scorm2/scorm2.html 

 

 


Yet Another Way to Send Large Files Across the Internet
This is important as we enter the era of sending students our Camtasia videos --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideos.htm
My PowerPoint file on Camtasia is at http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/EdTech/PowerPoint/

 

"Sending Large Files Down the Tubes:  Sharing Content Is Just a Drag And Drop Away," by Katherine Boehret, The Wall Street Journal,  October 3, 2007; Page D8 --- http://online.wsj.com/article/SB119137101138247131.html

 

Too many times, I've shared a large batch of digital files with friends or family members only to realize that I included an unwanted photo or shared with someone accidentally. But once these documents are sent, they're out of my control and on a server somewhere being distributed via email or through a photo-sharing service. Making certain files private or changing who has access to those files is a complicated, time-consuming process.

 

This week, I tested another product in the long line of programs that uses automatic synchronization to simplify the process of sharing large files by giving you the ability to change files and privacy options at any time. It's called Tubes (www.tubesnow.com) from Tubes Networks and it takes its name from the pneumatic vacuum-tube system commonly used in bank drive-throughs that motivated me to join my Mom on visits to the bank as a kid. Mom would pull up and a container would whoosh over through a tube to arrive beside the car window; after a quick exchange it returned with her deposit slip and a lollipop for me.

Tubes aims to work with the same sort of magic. Once installed, its desktop application stays opened on your computer as a place where "tubes" are made for sending files. Any type of file can be dragged, dropped and sent off to share with other people using these virtual tubes. As soon as you release data into a tube, a whoosh sounds (like that of the vacuum tube) and your files are encrypted and uploaded to the Tubes server.

Invited guests view your tube's data in its full, uncompressed format. The owner of the tube always has the final say on what is shared with whom, and changes made to tubes on your hard drive are detected instantly via automatic synchronization, guaranteeing viewers will always see the latest version of the tube. Shared tubes are also accessible via the Web, saving viewers from downloading the Tubes desktop program.

Other products like Sharpcast (www.sharpcast.com) and Pando (www.pando.com) also offer ways to share large digital files; Sharpcast uses synchronization similar to that of Tubes -- it all happens behind the scenes without any work on the user's part.

Tubes is available in a free version that provides a gigabyte of storage, or in paid versions with five, 10 and 20 gigabytes of storage for $6, $11 or $21, respectively.

Most of the time, Tubes worked well for me when I installed it on two Windows machines, one running XP and one running Vista. Tubes' smart use of an already familiar process -- dragging and dropping -- gives you the impression that you already know how to use it and makes sharing files seem easy. I started dragging all sorts of files into tubes that I created, naming them and labeling them with a representative icon (one of 10 offered by Tubes or one of my own images).

For all its usefulness, Tubes certainly has room for improvement. For now, there isn't a Mac version of the program, and when friends and I tried accessing shared tubes using a Mac Web browser, the results were inconsistent and sometimes didn't work at all. Windows Vista had its own issues. After installing Tubes on my Vista laptop, an error message labeled "invalid argument" made me feel like a member of the debate team. And I couldn't see thumbnail images of photos in my tubes using Vista, though I could on Windows XP.

Today, Tubes is releasing an updated version of its program that aims to improve the usability and look of the product, including refining the processes of sharing tubes and looking at tubes via the Web.

Before sharing tubes, I adjusted the permissions granted to each guest by labeling them as a Reader, Author or Editor; only the Owner can invite others to view a tube. But these labels can get confusing. More than once, I granted guests the highest level of permission, which is Editor, allowing them to make changes to the files in my tube, only for the guest to be asked for his registered Tubes email and password, which an invited guest shouldn't need.

The Tubes experience was best when the recipient of my Tubes invitations had the application installed on his or her desktop.

After installing Tubes on a computer at work, I installed it on my home PC and easily auto-synched tubes that I created at work onto my home PC -- a big plus.

Tubes incorporates the Web by assigning a unique URL to every file in every tube, and every tube automatically generates its own Web site, or "tubeSite," as it's called. Individual URLs for each file can be found by right clicking on a file and selecting an option to copy the URL into an email or browser. I copied the URL of a shared MP3 audio file and pasted it into my browser; it played a Fountains of Wayne song with no problem. But sharing these URLs with others is only possible if the owner gives permission.

Comments about tubes can be made in the "tubeBlog" -- accessible through any tube in the application or online. I created a tubeBlog for a tube with photos from one of my vacations, adding descriptions and comments to specific photos. Others, with my permission, could do the same, using the photos from the tube or just leaving comments.

A friend used Tubes to share photos with me while vacationing in Italy and Amsterdam. I added my own travel photos and an itinerary made in Microsoft Word to his tube and changed the tube's title; these alterations synched instantly.

Even if you aren't online, you can access tubes or make changes to them by dragging files in or taking them out; updates are made automatically the next time your computer connects to the Web.

Tubes is off to a good start, but it needs to improve its system to make permission levels more understandable for tube owners and those invited to see a shared tube. With a few improvements, Tubes could be a product that I'll continue using on Windows computers long after this column.

Continued in article

 

Bob Jensen's threads on competing alternatives for sending huge files (many of them free) are at
 http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Bookbob4.htm#SendingLargeFiles

 

 


Compressed Versus Uncompressed AVI Camtasia Video Files
Podcasting and Vodcasting Using Camtasia and Screencast

Although I've been using Camtasia for years, I've recently been preparing some Camtasia video for a road show that I will do on education technology. Camtasia is wonderful for making educational videos, especially narrated videos of lessons and tutorials on computer screens, videos of narrated PowerPoint files, interactive videos, podcasts (audio), Vodcasts (video), and narrated sequences of pictures turned into video files.

One really nice thing about Camtasia is that you do not have to record an entire video clip continuously, It's easy to record a segment and then hit the pause button (or F9 that's used both to start a recording session and pause a recording session). That way you have time for each segment to think about what you're going to say and to bring up software, video files, audio files, and/or Websites appropriate for that segment of the clip. When you've finished the entire clip you can hit the stop button (or F10) to generate a avi file. Later on you can "produce" a compressed version of the clip.

Camtasia generally captures video as uncompressed avi files. These uncompressed files are enormous and are not efficient for storing on CDs, DVDs, Web servers, Blackboard servers, WebCT servers, etc. Fortunately Camtasia has software called "Producer" in Camtasia Suite that compresses videos into much smaller files that can be played in common software such as wmv files for Windows Media Player, rm files for RealMedia, mov files for Quicktime, scf files for Adobe flash, mp3 files, and other "production" files.

I thought you might be interested in how much disk space is saved in the compression process. Last weekend I made a number of Camtasia avi videos and then compressed them into wmv video for Windows Media Player. I have both an old Camtasia 2 and a current Camtasia 4 (with updates). I captured the avi files using Camtasia 4, because this will also capture video playing on the screen. However, I found that the Producer software in Camtasia 2 gave me smaller compressed video files for some reason. The savings are shown below comparing the avi files and my compressed files:

Video Uncompressed AVI File Size Compressed Video File Size Video Run Time
Video 1 106,095 KB avi 5,928 KB wmv 02.57minutes
Video 2 319,904 KB avi 29,586 KB wmv 22.28 minutes
Video 3 162,745 KB avi 22,228 KB swf 05.47 minutes
Video 4 25,315 KB avi 4,766 KB wmv 04.49 minutes

Warning:  You can only edit the video (e.g., add fades, delete portions of clips, combine clips, split clits, change volume, etc) in the uncompressed avi video using Producer software. You lose quality in video and audio if you have to re-capture a compressed video as a avi file using Camtasia. Hence, it is best to store the initial avi files somewhere if you think you might want to edit later on.

The video size to runtime ratio varies greatly with both the capture rate and the size of the region on a computer screen that you are capturing. Since all the above videos were captured at the same (default) capture rate, the ratio of file size to run time varies greatly because the capture region varies in size in each of the above videos.  Capturing only a region greatly saves on the size of the captured video file. Capturing full or nearly-full screen sizes greatly adds to the video file size.

Video size relative to video run time also depends heavily on the frame rate at which the video is captured. Camtasia allows you to use a default setting for both the capture rate and audio interleaving. This is fast enough to capture video with audio playing on the screen with reasonable lip synching if the audio shows the face of a speaker. If you were making a video of a PowerPoint file without adding audio narration you could save disk space by greatly slowing down the video capture rate. However, I generally do not mess with the default settings. If you want to change the frame rates, you can read more about it --- Click Here
You can also change playback rates --- Click Here

Camtasia allows you to do some things like highlighting where your cursor is pointing. I generally use a big yellowish translucent circle around my mouse pointer. You can also have audio sounds whenever you click on your mouse and/or keyboard. This may alert student attention. You can also bring up a pen that allows you to write on video screens without writing on the computer program, like Excel, that you are running in the video.

You can also pan and zoom. Zoom lets you point to something like a cell formula in Excel and then make that formula larger and larger and larger. You can subsequently return to normal size. I use the panning feature when I am only recording a region of a screen such as a rectangle about a third of the size of the full computer screen. Capturing only a region greatly saves on the size of the captured video file. I use the panning feature to allow me to float the capture region to wherever I move my mouse. This allows me to capture anything appearing on a computer screen without having to capture a full screen in every video frame.

Years ago I started using Camtasia to field questions posed by students. For example, after technical lessons in my Accounting Information Systems course, I almost always received email messages from students who could not get something to work, especially in Excel and MS Access. I would then record a video tutorial and shared my answers with the entire current class and my future classes. You can download some of my sample wmv tutorials in this regard from http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/acct5342/
The acronym PQQ stands for Possible Quiz Question source.

I also prepared longer tutorials on more complicated technical lectures in my Accounting Theory course. Most all of my students were confused after my lectures in this course until they viewed my video tutorials over and over and over. Some of my tutorials for the theory course are at http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/acct5341/

I also recorded some general tutorials that you can download from http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/Tutorials/

I have other tutorials that are filed away somewhere on CDs. It would take some effort to dig them out now.

The nice thing about Camtasia is that it's is so simple to use when creating and compressing video. Editing video is more complicated. It is also possible to add hot spots to swf flash video that you have compressed such that you can create interactive videos for your students, including examination videos. However, this is extremely tedious. I found it better to create my interactive examination files in Excel and then link to my tutorial videos at any time in those Excel files.

The hard thing about Camtasia is getting the audio to sound professional. Actually, I found my narrations using a cheap microphone adequate for my course tutorials. This weekend I had satisfactory results using only the internal microphone that's built into my Dell laptop. However, audio could be improved with an expensive microphone and a sound proof booth. Ambient noise in your office can be irritating when recorded in video.

If you are recording in your office, you should probably disconnect the telephone during recording sessions. Also put a sign on your office door that you are in a recording session.

It is also possible to make videos of PowerPoint files. If you choose to do so you can easily add a Camtasia toolbar in your PowerPoint file such that you can make videos with audio narrations on any any part or all of a PowerPoint file. That way you can teach from PowerPoint when you're out of town, retired, or dead.Users can download compressed video files of PowerPoint files with less virus risk than from any MS Office files such as doc, xls. or ppt files. However, when I narrate any of my PowerPoint files and make videos of them, I generally find that even the compressed videos are enormous since my PowerPoint files usually have more than 50 slides. Actually, it is probably best to compress PowerPoint vides at a slow frame rate as swf Flash files. Since Powerpoint is not fast moving video, a slower frame rate is usually quite satisfactory.

Nevertheless, recording and serving up entire lectures requires huge amounts of disk space. If your university will not provide you with enough Web, Blackboard, or WebCT server space for such large video files, I suggest that you make a DVD disk of compressed video for each lesson and then make these disks available in the library or by mail to students. Your campus media center may have more creative solutions.

 

A summary video of using Camtasia for recording and serving up Podcasts, Vodcasts, and Audio Enhanced PowerPoint files --- Click Here

Three nice summary videos on how to create interactive Flash videos using Camtasia --- Click Here

You can find out more about Camtasia and related TechSmith products at http://www.techsmith.com/

You can watch an introductory video at http://video.techsmith.com/camtasia/latest/demo/summary/enu/cs_summary.html

TechSmith has a link to Richard Campbell's (University of Rio Grande) interactive examination questions at http://www.techsmith.com/camtasia/education.asp
However, the link to Richard's files appears to broken, and Richard says he can no longer find the illustration file.

Happy video, podcast, and vodcast producing!

 


Tip 2 of the Day for Camtasia Users:  Choose a Compression Option 

After you create a video Using Camtasia it is an avi file.  One problem is that the avi file may be enormous.  Another problem is that it can only be viewed by users who have installed the Camtasia viewer. 

Not every user has every media player. That’s why Camtasia Studio supports various popular multimedia formats:

       Macromedia Flash (.flv and .swf)

       Windows Media (.wmv)

       Apple QuickTime (.mov)

       RealNetworks RealMedia (.rm)

       And More!

Warning:  When I made some of my tutorials on using Camtasia, only the RealMedia compression option was not available.  Until I update that video, keep in mind that the other compression options are now available.  My older tutorial video is linked at http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideos.htm
One of these days I might find the time to update this tutorial.

The Camtasia homepage is at http://www.techsmith.com/products/studio/default.asp
For audio, you need a microphone plugged into your computer.  And don’t forget to turn the audio on using menu option (Effects, Audio, Record Audio).  

Question
What is Morae?

Answer
I love Camtasia and use it all the time to make video from my computer screens while I narrate into a microphone --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideos.htm 

Now TechSmith has come out with an even better product called Morae --- http://www.techsmith.com/products/morae/morae.asp 

Morae is a revolutionary new computer recording system based on Rich Recording TechnologyTM, which not only records the computer screen and camera video, but also automatically creates a synchronized chronicle of events occuring behind-the-scenes in applications and the operating system. Now you can search screen and video recordings based on specific events that occurred - like when a user hit a certain keystroke, opened a particular dialog box, clicked a certain tool button or viewed specific text. Easily perform in-depth analysis, mark important segments and quickly create highlight videos to share.

Morae is an easy-to-use and easy-to-implement usability testing tool that allows you to record, log, analyze and present. It was designed from the ground up based on in-depth research and feedback from usability professionals.


Tip 3 
One of the frustrations I have with Camtasia and Morae is that recording audio other than your microphone-in instructions is frustrating.  I received the following message from a technician at Tech Smith.  The link he provides is very informative.

          

Tip 4 (How to Edit Video)

PC editing software answer from Walt Mossberg, The Wall Street Journal, December 22, 2005; Page B4 --- http://online.wsj.com/article/mossberg_mailbox.html

Q: A friend of mine is looking for some video-editing software to be used on a PC running Windows. What software would you recommend for this application?

A: I haven't tested this category of software in a while, but any of the leading software packages should do. They include Pinnacle Studio Plus, Adobe Premiere Elements and Roxio Easy Media Creator. The first two are video-editing programs. The last includes a video-editing program, but it is a suite that also handles things like music and photos. Of the two video-only programs, Pinnacle's is probably best for a novice user. It costs about $90.

Jensen Comment
What separates the amateurs like me from the pros is the ability to edit the audio that accompanies the video.  When you want to add or remove frames containing audio, you had best employ a pro.

 

 


Free Multi-featured Sound Recorder (Audacity) --- http://audacity.sourceforge.net/about/features

Although I prefer Camtasia when I want to narrate a video of my computer screen action (e.g., when preparing a video tutorial on something technical), there are times when audio alone will suffice and take up a whole lot less space on a hard drive or server. 

Those of you who would like to prepare audio podcasting files may also want a good sound recorder on your PC.

I highly recommend the free Audacity software.  It downloads and installs very quickly.  Its many features are listed at --- http://audacity.sourceforge.net/about/features



"Building Programming Tutorials with Codecademy," by Anastasia Salter, Chronicle of Higher Education, February 8, 2012 --- Click Here
http://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/building-programming-tutorials-with-codecademy/38378?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

For those learning to code this year, either for professional reasons or to expand personal horizons, Codecademy has been a popular tool. Jason has written about Codecademy as a platform for code-literacy, and I discussed the Codeyear “new year’s resolution” initiative the site launched in January. Now the platform has expanded even further with the addition of tools that allow any user to create new courses and projects in JavaScript, Python and Ruby.

Codecademy may not be a substitute for more traditional forms of programming instruction, but this new platform does offer possibilities for shaping hybrid learning or building coding familiarity into a course dedicated to another topic, as customized tutorials could supplement face to face instruction. Julie Meloni makes some great points about the pedagogical problems of Codecademy and the question of results: “…it is not teaching you how to code. It is teaching you how to call-and-response, and is not particularly helpful in explaining why you’re responding, why they’re calling, or—most importantly—how to become a composer.” I share a number of these concerns, particularly when Codecademy is the only source of knowledge–and I hope that this new tool affords Codecademy the opportunity to crowdsource new approaches to pedagogy.

There are some great examples of instructional programming tools available for free on the web, such as Scratch, MIT’s young-learner friendly code “building blocks.” (Scratch is just one kid-targeted programming tool: there are other great suggestions at Digital Humanities Q&A.) But these are often starter languages that don’t directly apply to web development or other applications, and thus require additional investment before literacy in more widely-used languages is achieved.

The choice of languages in Codecademy’s toolset focuses on utilitarian scripting languages with a range of potential applications. As Ryan Cordell noted in Ruby for Humanists, Ruby is a great starting language and its inclusion is particularly promising. As Ryan mentioned, there’s already a site for learning programming basics through Ruby tutorials: Hackety Hack. But Codecademy moves a step further with an easy system for building and sharing interactive tutorials.

Continued in article

4Teachers: Teach with Technology --- http://www.4teachers.org/

Bob Jensen's threads on new and old tools are at
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/thetools.htm#NewTools

 


Video Courses

Probably the most successful use of video is the Adept program at Stanford University where engineering students can get an entire Masters of Engineering degree almost entirely from video courses http://www.educause.edu/ir/library/html/cnc9838/cnc9838.html


Basic accounting students At BYU have great success learning accounting from special videos --- http://snipurl.com/videoBYU 

Contact Information: 
Cameron Earl 801-836-5649 cameronearl@byu.edu
Norm Nemrow 801-422-3029 nemrow@byu.edu 

Also see David Cottrell's approach at BYU --- http://www.business.uconn.edu/users/adunbar/AAA-CPE/AAA2003Cottrell.pdf 


Update message on November 3, 2005

Bob has posted our new website in an earlier post, but the new URL to our new website describing our accounting tools is www.accountingcds.com

We have a demo of VSP (the technology that speeds up the video and audio) technology here: http://www.accountingcds.com/learn/links/vspdemo.htm 

Cameron Earl

BYU


Learning Basic Financial Accounting at Brigham Young University (BYU) From Homegrown Videos
Developer and Instructor:  Norman Nemrow [nemrow@byu.edu
Title of Package of Eight CDs:  Introduction to Accounting:  The Language of Business
Textbook:  I think this package can be used along with virtually any basic accounting textbook
Pedagogy:  Students learn from video lesson modules before each class.  The video lessons display 
                  the course instructor in video as well as accompanying PowerPoint displays that are auto-
                  matically sequenced with the video.  Students have nifty options to both replay the previous
                  five minutes and to play the videos a double (2x) speed that is an outstanding option
                  for reviewing previously-learned material.
Classes:  Classes are more inspirational than perspirational (e.g., frequent use of visiting speakers)
Outcomes:  Purportedly students perform better vis--vis previous lecture pedagogy without video. 
                   See the following evaluation of learning:

 "Variable Speed Playback of Digitally Recorded Lectures: Evaluating Learner Feedback," by Joel D. Galbraith (joel_galbraith@byu.edu ) and Steven G. Spencer --- http://www.enounce.com/docs/BYUPaper020319.pdf 

Cost:

  1. Student purchase of CD set for around $45.  Colleges can negotiate pricing with BYU.

  2. $19.99 for download and installation of the Enounce 2xAV video plug-in --- http://www.enounce.com/ 

Bob Jensen's Bottom-Line Conclusion:  
Bravo Norm!  This is a tremendous pedagogy for all levels of accounting education

Bob Jensen's Recommendations for Improvements:

  1. Flash video is restricted to video of PowerPoint slides accompanying a talking head.  I 
    prefer a Camtasia video development that allows an instructor to easily make video and 
    audio lesson modules from other software such as MS Excel, MS Access, accounting software
    like Intuit, tax software, simulation software, etc.  

     
  2. The product could be greatly improved if instructors could customize lessons by adding their own
    video modules.  This is especially exciting for instructors using Camtasia.  
    See http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideos.htm#Video 

  3. The 2xAV plug-in allows students to make use of the tremendous double speed advantage when
    there are a lot of video modules to learn and re-learn.  However, this is a pain for campus 
    computing labs that have to install such a plug-in all lab computers.  I recommend an option that
    will allow video playback on computers that do not have the 2xAV plug-in.

  4. There is also a minor glich for Windows XP operating systems.  I got the video lessons to work
    wonderfully on my old computer having a Windows NT operating system.  The lessons did not
    work initially on my new computer running under Windows XP

October 8 message from Cameron Earl [byu@burgoyne.com

Bob,

I know exactly what your problem is. We have identified a problem with Windows XP and our CDs due to a legal dispute between Sun Microsystems and Microsoft. I have attached a small document, which will fix your problem. Four files are needed for the fix. Unfortunately, they are too big for me to send with my current internet connection. I will go to campus soon and send them. Please call me anytime (even after normal business hours) if you have any questions. 801-836-5649

Cameron Earl

Find out more about ordering options from Cameron at 801-836-5649 or by email at Cameron Earl [byu@burgoyne.com
A Website for this product is still under development at the Marriott School of Business at BYU.


Update February 29, 2004

Basic accounting students At BYU have great success learning accounting from special videos --- http://snipurl.com/videoBYU 

Contact Information: 
Cameron Earl 801-836-5649 cameronearl@byu.edu
Norm Nemrow 801-422-3029 nemrow@byu.edu 

Also see David Cottrell's approach at BYU --- http://www.business.uconn.edu/users/adunbar/AAA-CPE/AAA2003Cottrell.pdf 

Advanced Video Technology
Amy Dunbar developed the following links for all participants in her workshop in Hawaii .  She also gave me permission to share it with readers of New Bookmarks.  Thanks to Amy and her other team members for sharing their presentation materials.
Using Technology to Distribute Course Content On and Off Campus AAA Annual Meeting - 2003
Continuing Education Workshop --- http://www.business.uconn.edu/users/adunbar/AAA-CPE/agenda.htm  

Bob Jensen's threads and videos, including a video on how to develop your own course materials using the cheap and easy Camtasia Studio software can be found at http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideos.htm 


July 5, 2005 message from Brigham Young University's Cameron Earl [cameronearl@byu.edu]

Bob,

Its been a while since we have spoken/ emailed. I hope you are doing well. I noticed on your thread that you do not have our updated information- namely our website. Norm Nemrow and I have developed a new website that explains more about our CDs and the teaching model we use at BYU. You may find interesting. In fact, we would love some feedback if you have the time to look at it. The site is brand new and still has one more round of editing (i.e., correcting typos and such) Norm values your opinion greatly. Just thought I would let you know about it. Feel free to share it with others.

Its www.byuaccounting.com 

Take care

Cameron Earl

Also note that David Cottrell from BYU participated in Amy Dunbar's education technology workshop prior to the American Accounting Association Annual Meeting in Hawaii --- http://www.business.uconn.edu/users/adunbar/AAA-CPE/AAA2003Cottrell.pdf


February 28 message from Richard Campbell [campbell@RIO.EDU

I am doing a comparison of Robodemo v5.0 elearning edition and Camtasia v2.02. I use both - sometimes in the same project. Both are very easy to use.

Robodemo advantages over Camtasia: The Flash hotspot output allow for quizzing that can be sent to a LMS (Learning Management System). Robodemo allows for limited scriptability with Javascript.

Camtasia has more output options - avi - mov - real - wnv - Camtasia v2.02 has some minor crash issues for some people,

Camtasia has a "Theater" utility which allows you to chain swf files together. Ehelp did have a utility called RoboPresenter that was and is more flexible that Camtasia's Theater More on this later.

Richard Campbell

February 28, 2004 reply from Bob Jensen

Thank you for the update Richard.

The one feature that I would like to see added is a convenient way of choosing between microphone audio versus line-in audio versus audio that is already stored on the computer. Sometimes what I would really like is to use Camtasia to record audio and/or video clips that are playing on the computer so I can insert these segments.

For example, suppose that I was recording a Camtasia video on fraud. It would be nice to be able to insert a small video segment of an ex con while explaining fraud in some program like Excel, PowerPoint, or Internet Explorer.

I realize that the Camtasia video degrades captured video due to a lower sampling rate (usually 5 frames per second) versus normal video frame rates of 30 per second. However, this may not be a huge problem in short video clips as long as the audio is good.

In Camtasia it is possible to run a hard wire from the audio out jack on the back of the computer to the microphone jack, but this is a pain in the tail and does not generally lead to good capturing of audio.

Is there any solution for this until Tech Smith finally upgrades for better audio and video recording of something other than microphone voice while capturing Camtasia video?

Is this also a problem in Robodemo?

Bob Jensen

Bob Jensen's threads on Camtasia are at http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideos.htm 

February 28, 2004 reply from Richard Campbell [campbell@RIO.EDU

Bob: To integrate video into Powerpoint you could try the free Microsoft Producer or try apresso:

www.apreso.com 

The link below will integrate a number of alternative file formats and was marketed by ehelp as RoboPresenter until Macromedia bought ehelp.

http://www.articulateglobal.com/main.html 

February 29, 2004 reply from John Schatzel [jschatzel@STONEHILL.EDU

 I have been looking into this type of Flash tutorial creation software myself and found that Camtasia was well featured but not as powerful as RoboDemo, which is probably why Macromedia acquired the company. RoboDemo is also the most expensive: $500 Yikes! although educational pricing may be available. At the other end, I like Wink, which is FREE! If it does what you want then you can't beat Wink: http://www.debugmode.com/wink/  If it doesn't, then you have to pay. If your school is picking up the tab, then I would say go for RoboDemo unless you find it too difficult to use. I believe there is a 15-day trial version on the Macromdia site.

John Schatzel 
Professor of Accounting and Information Systems 
Stonehill College

 


Video Helpers

Video and Other Helper Tutorials --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideosSummary.htm 
(New videos will be added steadily for the next several months.  I love Camtasia.)


Compressed Versus Uncompressed AVI Camtasia Video Files
Podcasting and Vodcasting Using Camtasia and Screencast

Although I've been using Camtasia for years, I've recently been preparing some Camtasia video for a road show that I will do on education technology. Camtasia is wonderful for making educational videos, especially narrated videos of lessons and tutorials on computer screens, videos of narrated PowerPoint files, interactive videos, podcasts (audio), Vodcasts (video), and narrated sequences of pictures turned into video files.

One really nice thing about Camtasia is that you do not have to record an entire video clip continuously, It's easy to record a segment and then hit the pause button (or F9 that's used both to start a recording session and pause a recording session). That way you have time for each segment to think about what you're going to say and to bring up software, video files, audio files, and/or Websites appropriate for that segment of the clip. When you've finished the entire clip you can hit the stop button (or F10) to generate a avi file. Later on you can "produce" a compressed version of the clip.

Camtasia generally captures video as uncompressed avi files. These uncompressed files are enormous and are not efficient for storing on CDs, DVDs, Web servers, Blackboard servers, WebCT servers, etc. Fortunately Camtasia has software called "Producer" in Camtasia Suite that compresses videos into much smaller files that can be played in common software such as wmv files for Windows Media Player, rm files for RealMedia, mov files for Quicktime, scf files for Adobe flash, mp3 files, and other "production" files.

I thought you might be interested in how much disk space is saved in the compression process. Last weekend I made a number of Camtasia avi videos and then compressed them into wmv video for Windows Media Player. I have both an old Camtasia 2 and a current Camtasia 4 (with updates). I captured the avi files using Camtasia 4, because this will also capture video playing on the screen. However, I found that the Producer software in Camtasia 2 gave me smaller compressed video files for some reason. The savings are shown below comparing the avi files and my compressed files:

Video Uncompressed AVI File Size Compressed Video File Size Video Run Time
Video 1 106,095 KB avi 5,928 KB wmv 02.57minutes
Video 2 319,904 KB avi 29,586 KB wmv 22.28 minutes
Video 3 162,745 KB avi 22,228 KB swf 05.47 minutes
Video 4 25,315 KB avi 4,766 KB wmv 04.49 minutes

Warning:  You can only edit the video (e.g., add fades, delete portions of clips, combine clips, split clits, change volume, etc) in the uncompressed avi video using Producer software. You lose quality in video and audio if you have to re-capture a compressed video as a avi file using Camtasia. Hence, it is best to store the initial avi files somewhere if you think you might want to edit later on.

The video size to runtime ratio varies greatly with both the capture rate and the size of the region on a computer screen that you are capturing. Since all the above videos were captured at the same (default) capture rate, the ratio of file size to run time varies greatly because the capture region varies in size in each of the above videos.  Capturing only a region greatly saves on the size of the captured video file. Capturing full or nearly-full screen sizes greatly adds to the video file size.

Video size relative to video run time also depends heavily on the frame rate at which the video is captured. Camtasia allows you to use a default setting for both the capture rate and audio interleaving. This is fast enough to capture video with audio playing on the screen with reasonable lip synching if the audio shows the face of a speaker. If you were making a video of a PowerPoint file without adding audio narration you could save disk space by greatly slowing down the video capture rate. However, I generally do not mess with the default settings. If you want to change the frame rates, you can read more about it --- Click Here
You can also change playback rates --- Click Here

Camtasia allows you to do some things like highlighting where your cursor is pointing. I generally use a big yellowish translucent circle around my mouse pointer. You can also have audio sounds whenever you click on your mouse and/or keyboard. This may alert student attention. You can also bring up a pen that allows you to write on video screens without writing on the computer program, like Excel, that you are running in the video.

You can also pan and zoom. Zoom lets you point to something like a cell formula in Excel and then make that formula larger and larger and larger. You can subsequently return to normal size. I use the panning feature when I am only recording a region of a screen such as a rectangle about a third of the size of the full computer screen. Capturing only a region greatly saves on the size of the captured video file. I use the panning feature to allow me to float the capture region to wherever I move my mouse. This allows me to capture anything appearing on a computer screen without having to capture a full screen in every video frame.

Years ago I started using Camtasia to field questions posed by students. For example, after technical lessons in my Accounting Information Systems course, I almost always received email messages from students who could not get something to work, especially in Excel and MS Access. I would then record a video tutorial and shared my answers with the entire current class and my future classes. You can download some of my sample wmv tutorials in this regard from http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/acct5342/
The acronym PQQ stands for Possible Quiz Question source.

I also prepared longer tutorials on more complicated technical lectures in my Accounting Theory course. Most all of my students were confused after my lectures in this course until they viewed my video tutorials over and over and over. Some of my tutorials for the theory course are at http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/acct5341/

I also recorded some general tutorials that you can download from http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/Tutorials/

I have other tutorials that are filed away somewhere on CDs. It would take some effort to dig them out now.

The nice thing about Camtasia is that it's is so simple to use when creating and compressing video. Editing video is more complicated. It is also possible to add hot spots to swf flash video that you have compressed such that you can create interactive videos for your students, including examination videos. However, this is extremely tedious. I found it better to create my interactive examination files in Excel and then link to my tutorial videos at any time in those Excel files.

The hard thing about Camtasia is getting the audio to sound professional. Actually, I found my narrations using a cheap microphone adequate for my course tutorials. This weekend I had satisfactory results using only the internal microphone that's built into my Dell laptop. However, audio could be improved with an expensive microphone and a sound proof booth. Ambient noise in your office can be irritating when recorded in video.

If you are recording in your office, you should probably disconnect the telephone during recording sessions. Also put a sign on your office door that you are in a recording session.

It is also possible to make videos of PowerPoint files. If you choose to do so you can easily add a Camtasia toolbar in your PowerPoint file such that you can make videos with audio narrations on any any part or all of a PowerPoint file. That way you can teach from PowerPoint when you're out of town, retired, or dead.Users can download compressed video files of PowerPoint files with less virus risk than from any MS Office files such as doc, xls. or ppt files. However, when I narrate any of my PowerPoint files and make videos of them, I generally find that even the compressed videos are enormous since my PowerPoint files usually have more than 50 slides. Actually, it is probably best to compress PowerPoint vides at a slow frame rate as swf Flash files. Since Powerpoint is not fast moving video, a slower frame rate is usually quite satisfactory.

Nevertheless, recording and serving up entire lectures requires huge amounts of disk space. If your university will not provide you with enough Web, Blackboard, or WebCT server space for such large video files, I suggest that you make a DVD disk of compressed video for each lesson and then make these disks available in the library or by mail to students. Your campus media center may have more creative solutions.

 

A summary video of using Camtasia for recording and serving up Podcasts, Vodcasts, and Audio Enhanced PowerPoint files --- Click Here

Three nice summary videos on how to create interactive Flash videos using Camtasia --- Click Here

You can find out more about Camtasia and related TechSmith products at http://www.techsmith.com/

You can watch an introductory video at http://video.techsmith.com/camtasia/latest/demo/summary/enu/cs_summary.html

TechSmith has a link to Richard Campbell's (University of Rio Grande) interactive examination questions at http://www.techsmith.com/camtasia/education.asp
However, the link to Richard's files appears to broken, and Richard says he can no longer find the illustration file.

Happy video, podcast, and vodcast producing!


How can you capture and send streaming media?

Answer --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/thetools.htm#StreamingMedia

Ratings and reviews of media streaming software --- http://www.homeofficereports.com/streaming%20video.htm


Video and Audio Recording for Classrooms

September 8, 2005 message from Glen Gray [glen.gray@CSUN.EDU]

Does anybody have any experience with Microsoft’s OneNote? What caught my eye was the mention in an article that you can use OneNote to record audio (e.g., during a meeting) on your computer (like a tape recorder). I was looking at the program on the Microsoft site and see that OneNote is software for organizing stuff (note, files, graphics, etc.).

Any thoughts for comments on OneNote? Any comments on other programs that I could use to record audio? I particularly want to record during meetings. I know that there are stand alone recorders, but it is one more thing to take to the meeting.

Glen L. Gray, PhD, CPA
Dept. of Accounting & Information Systems
College of Business & Economics
California State University, Northridge
Northridge, CA 91330-8372
818.677.3948

http://www.csun.edu/~vcact00f 

September 9, 2005 reply from Bob Jensen

Hi Glen,

There is a highly favorable review (that does not go far into the audio features) at http://wordprocessing.about.com/od/choosingsoftware/a/onenoterev.htm 
I suspect Richard Campbell will weigh in on this with better suggestions.

I would think there is a problem with audio hardware much the same as I have a problem with my video camera at meetings. Unless I sit in the front row, it is difficult to pick up the speaker’s voice. If there is audience/class discussion throughout a room, it is very difficult to capture individual speakers.

The FBI probably has better audio capturing hardware than we can put on our laptops, but I would not expect OneNote software to magically allow us to get quality recordings at many meetings.

That does not mean that we should not download the free trial offer just to test out OneNote for all the many features claimed in the review above. It would seem that it will work optimally with a Tablet PC.

Bob Jensen

September 8, 2005 reply from Amy Dunbar

I don’t have experience with OneNote, but capturing audio is always a struggle for me. Camtasia is wonderful for screen capture video with audio, but to just record audio has presented more problems for me. I used to use the Microsoft Sound Recorder (under Accessories in Windows) and convert the wav file to an .rm file using Real Producer. Now that I have left the Real world (;-)), I am recording in Screenblaster and rendering the file as an MP3 file. I find it annoying, however, to have a music program, like ITunes, open it. I just want it to immediately play when the student clicks the link. If anyone has a better solution for converting wav files to a better format, I would love to hear about it. A UConn ITS person recommended CDEX

http://cdexos.sourceforge.net/ , which is open source freeware.

Back to what you were asking, Glen. How would you capture everyone’s voices unless they had mics? I know audio conference tools can capture everyone, but in that case, each person is speaking into a mic at his/her computer.

And speaking of audio conferencing, does anyone know how many people can be in a Skype audio conference? I have only experienced three at a time. I am teaching a small PhD class, and I have asked my students to download Skype ( www.skype.com ) so we can easily find each other because all of us work at home a lot (which is a good thing in these times of skyrocketing gas prices). When a California colleague’s cell phone connection was to weak to have a conversation, we switched to Skype, and it worked like a charm.

Amy at UCon

September 9, 2005 reply from Jim Richards [J.Richards@MURDOCH.EDU.AU]

Hi Amy,

My recollection with Skype is that the maximum is 5.

Cheers,
Jim Richards
Murdoch Business School
Murdoch University South Street
MURDOCH WA
Australia

September 9, 2005 reply from Jim Richards [J.Richards@MURDOCH.EDU.AU]

Hi Glen
You may find that to record using your laptop might need a good quality omni-directional microphone to pick up a sufficiently loud signal.

Some open source software that can be used to record and export mp3 files is Audacity ( http://audacity.sourceforge.net ).

We use it at my local Church to record all of our ministry. You need to also download and install LAME to be able to export to mp3.

Cheers.

Jim Richards
Murdoch Business School
Murdoch University South Street
MURDOCH WA 6150 Phone: 61-8-9360-2706 Fax: 61-8-9310-5004

September 8, 2005 reply from Bob Jensen

Hi Amy,

I can’t help with you’re SKYPE question.

But I want to add that the new version of Camtasia allows for camcorder input so that the image is no longer just confined to computer screen images. Even though digital video takes up massive amounts of space, Camtasia videos do not have to be space hogging full screens and the videos can be compressed in the final production.

The big problem with video capturing at meetings is that the video is often less interesting than the audio unless the speaker is using visual aids. Capturing video of a talking head is a total waste of space digitally speaking. I still use an analog camera and space is no problem since video tapes are cheap ways to store lots of video.

My problem of course is that my hundreds of video tapes will soon be as obsolete as my withering 8-track audio tapes. Soon we won’t be able to buy new machines that will play video tapes, so take good care of the old players in your house or office. And consider putting them to DVD in the near future.

Bob Jensen

Converting Home Videos to DVDs

Q: Are there services that will take home video and burn it to a DVD that can be played anywhere? I know I can do this on my PC, but it takes too much time and I keep running into problems when I try it.

A: There are such services. One that I have tested and found to be good is called YesVideo (yesvideo.com). You bring your videos into a store that works with YesVideo -- including CVS, Walgreen, Best Buy and Target -- and they send the tapes to YesVideo, which converts them to a very nice DVD. You also can get the same service online, at Sony's ImageStation site ( www.imagestation.com ). Sony calls its service Video2DVD, but it really is just the YesVideo service. My full review of the service is at: ptech.wsj.com/archive/solution-20040128.html. Because YesVideo works through retailers, prices vary, but are usually around $25-$35 for a two-hour video. Each DVD is divided into chapters based on a YesVideo process that tries to detect scene changes in your videos. At the end, there are three 60-second music videos made from scenes on your videos. The company also will put your prints, slides and even old film onto DVD, but this costs more and is handled by fewer retailers. Details are at the YesVideo Web site.
Walter Mossberg, "Converting Home Videos to DVDs," The Wall Street Journal, August 25, 2005; Page B3 --- http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB112492084317722331,00.html?mod=todays_us_marketplace

At last there will be a way to efficiently store digital video
But this is no ordinary recording process. The disc has more than 60 times the storage capacity of a standard DVD, while the drive writes about 10 times faster than a conventional DVD burner. That means the disc can store up to 128 hours of video content--almost twice enough for the full nine seasons of Seinfeld--and records it all in less than three hours.
Holographic Memory
By Gregory T. Huang , "Holographic Memory," MIT's Technology Review, September 2005 --- http://www.technologyreview.com/articles/05/09/issue/feature_memory.asp?trk=nl


Convert AVI to WMV, BMP, JPG, etc. - OSS Video Decompiler 4.0 --- http://www.tomdownload.com/multimedia_design/video/oss_video_decompiler.htm

Powerful Video Decompiler that supports decompiling video files to extract the individual image frames. Supports AVI to WMV, AVI to GIF, AVI to (PNG, JPEG, JPG, EMF, WMV, BMP, and more). Video Decompiling (Supported formats AVI to GIF, AVI to PNG (Portable Network Graphics), AVI to JPEG, AVI to TIFF, AVI to EMF, AVI to WMV). Convert multiple video files at once (Batch Conversion). Many modern features were added to the latest versions. Now you can save and load video conversion and effects settings using XML.

 


It appears that Camstudio has a freeware video screen capture system that competes with the non-freeware Camtasia (that I love) for capturing computer screen activity in to video.  The Camstudio software lacks many of the great features of Camtasia, especially the feature that allows for conversion of the AVI files into RealMedia Files (to both save space and avoid having to download a special player for playback).

Hi Bob,

We would like to introduce our new freeware which can record screen activity into standard AVI movie files. It is an ideal tool for developing videos to demonstrate features of a new software, for creating movies used in user training or any other task that requires the capture of desktop activity.

The program is easy to use, and you can select an area or full desktop for recording. You can adjust the video quality settings to reduce file size, use custom cursors and add a soundtrack through your microphone.

[Name and version of app ] 
CamStudio 1.1

[Link to homepage of app] http://www.atomixbuttons.com/vsc 

[System requirements] Microsoft Windows 98, Me, NT 4.0, 2000 or later. 400 MHz processor . 64 MB RAM 4 MB of hard-disk space for program installation.

[Download link] http://www.atomixbuttons.com/vsc/setup.exe 

RenderSoft Software [jupboo@pacific.net.sg

The FAQ site has a nice explanation of hardware acceleration problems that can arise when playing back any AVI files on newer computers --- http://www.atomixbuttons.com/vsc/ 

When I play back a full-screen AVI file using Windows Media Player by double clicking it, the text and graphics becomes blurred.

There are two main reasons for the movie being blurred.

One is that you are using Windows Media Player to play back a movie that has a frame size that is as big or bigger than the screen. 

In this case, Windows Media Player will shrink the picture to fit it on the screen. This cause the  text and graphics to be blurry. To view the movie in full quality, you will need to switch Windows Media Player to full screen playback, or switch your monitor to a higher resolution .

You may also record a smaller region to avoid this problem. Otherwise you may need to use the Movie Player software that is distributed with the CamStudio package to playback the movie.

Another reason for the cause of the unclear image is the use of Lossy Codec as your compressor. This means the compressor will degrade the quality of your picture to reduce the size of your AVI file.

To remedy this, you may either set the Quality settings in Video Options to a higher value, or use a Lossless Codec for your compressor (e.g Microsoft RLE is a lossless codec that is available only in the display mode of 256 colors).


When I press the F9 key to stop the recorder when the program is minimized, the save dialog does not appear.


Try minimizing all other windows on your desktop. The save dialog window is probably hidden behind them.


Can I use the AVI files recorded with CamStudio for commercial purposes ?


Yes, of course. The AVI files created with CamStudio may be used for any purposes, including commercial purposes. You may sell your recorded .AVI files or charge users for products that include those AVIs.



How come when I try to record something playing in Windows Media Player (or Real Player or Apple QuickTime), it comes out blank?


This is because hardware acceleration is being used in these players. You may want to disable hardware acceleration in these players :

Windows Media Player 7:
Choose Tools:Options (and select the Performance tab). Set the Hardware Acceleration slider to None.

Windows Media Player 6.4 and earlier:
Choose View: Options : Playback. Set the Hardware Acceleration slider to None.

Apple QuickTime:
Choose Edit : Preferences : Streaming Transport. Select Video Settings in the combobox and uncheck all DirectDraw options.

RealPlayer G2:
Choose Options/Preferences (and select the Performance tab). Uncheck the "Use Optimized Video Display" setting.

Disabling Hardware Acceleration System Wide
Another solution is to disable hardware acceleration for your whole system.

To do this on Windows 2000, go to the Control Panel, choose Display : Properties : Settings : Advanced : Troubleshooting. Set the Hardware Acceleration slider to None.

For other versions of Windows, go to the Control Panel, choose System, (and under the performance tab), choose Graphics : Advanced. Set the Hardware Acceleration slider to None.



When I record my DVD player, the output is blank.


DVD players usually require hardware acceleration to run. You may not be able to capture movies from your DVD player.



My Win 2000 system freezes when I record with CamStudio.


Try turning off system wide hardware acceleration and reducing the input frame rate of CamStudio.

Turning off system wide hardware acceleration :
Please read FAQ above on how to go about in disabling system wide hardware acceleration.

Reducing Frame Rate:
In CamStudio, go to Options : Video Options and increase the value of "Capture Frames Every __ milliseconds"



When I click the Record button, I get an "Error Creating AVI file" message.


Try going to Options : Video Options, and select a different compressor.



I am recording a game with its sound effects and music. The video comes out fine but how come the audio is missing ?


CamStudio 1.1 can only record audio from the microphone. If you need to record the audio playing in the speakers, one suggestion is to place your microphone near your speakers.


How can I optimize the video settings to get the best results ? Can you suggest a good video setting ?


One setting which gives very good frame rates is to use 256 color display mode with MS RLE as Compressor.

Futhermore, in Options: Video Options

In general, you should adjust the Set Key Frames Every and Playback Rate to be equal 1000/Capture Frame Every. For example, if Capture Frame Every is 5, then the Playback Rate should be 1000/5 = 200.

However, if you are creating a time-lapse movie, (in which your Capture Frame Every is a very large value), you may want to set the Playback Rate to be around 20 to 30 frames/second.



I have fininshed recording with CamStudio and would like to trim/cut some of the frames in the AVI. Are there any freeware video editors that can do this?


VirtualDub is a great freeware video editor for editing AVIs. Download it at http://www.virtualdub.org/index



I am trying to record a DOS application by switching to it from Windows, and it seems to be impossible as all I get is some sort of fuzzy stuff in the playback.


CamStudio cannot record your DOS application when it is running in full screen DOS mode. Try recording your DOS application in windowed mode.

You can make your full-screen DOS application into a window by pressing CTRL-ESC when you are in DOS mode. This will return you to the Windows screen. If you look at the task-bar, you will notice a new item "MS-DOS prompt". By right-clicking on this item, and selecting Properties, a dialog box will be displayed. Choose the Screen tab and under Usage, select Window and click "OK". Your DOS screen will now become a window. You can start recording from here and the output should be fine.



Does CamStudio record DirectX, OpenGL applications and special windows such as the Office Assistant in MS Word?


This actually depends on your system. For most cases, CamStudio should be able to record DirectX and OpenGL programs if they are running in windowed mode rather than full-screen mode.

( I successfully recorded the Office Assistant in one computer running Win Me, but could not do so in another with Win 2000 installed. )



I need to save in the QuickTime or Mpeg format. How can I do that with CamStudio ?

CamStudio does not save videos in the QuickTime or Mpeg movie format directly. You will need third party software to do the conversion.

For Quicktime movies, you may use QuickTime Pro from http://www.apple.com/quicktime/.

For Mpeg, there is a free AVI to MPEG converter on the internet.   Click here for free AVI to MPEG1 converter




How can I convert AVI files to Windows Media files (.ASF  .WMV) for streaming on the Internet.

You may use the free Microsoft Windows Media Encoder 7 to convert AVI files to ASF or WMV format.

Windows Media Encoder is available without charge at:

http://www.microsoft.com/windows/windowsmedia/en/wm7/encoder.html



When I record a large window, the computer becomes very slow. How can I capture a large window fast enough?

Capturing a large frame and compressing it are time-intensive operations. Your computer may not be fast able to handle such frame rates at these sizes.

You can try to



I have downloaded your source code and found them very interesting. Would you tell me how the function XXX in file YYY works ?

Please do not direct technical questions related to the source code to us.



I am a programmer. How can I implement the feature of adding text/graphics overlay into the movie ?

You may want take a look at the functions

captureScreenFrame
InsertHighLight


in the file vscapView.cpp of the source code to see how we implemented the drawing of highlights into a frame of the AVI movie. The addition of text/graphics overlay should be very similar.

One of the most frequently asked questions asked in my education technology workshops is as follows:  
"In what ways should course content materials be modified for online learning?"

My quick and dirty response is that faculty who develop content should learn how to use FrontPage or some other good HTML editor and then learn how to screen capture and video capture themselves rather than relying upon technicians.  You can learn Microsoft FrontPage, screen capturing, and Camtasia video capturing in just a few days with a little help from your friends.  With a little added effort, you can make your online course materials more interactive by saving Excel worksheets as interactive Webpages and by learning how to use JavaScript.  You can learn all of these things in less than a week if you have the correct software and hardware.

  1. Use more screen captures, audio captures, and video captures of things that you normally demo in lecture presentations.   Look under "Resources" at http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/newfaculty.htm 
    Also see my tutorials at http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideos.htm 

  2. MP3 Audio
    Audio capturing is especially important since you can let students hear what you like to say in lectures or case discussions.  For example, in an Excel spreadsheet you can add buttons that students can click on to hear your explanation of what is going on in various cells of the spreadsheet.  Look under "Resources" at http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/newfaculty.htm 

  3. Camtasia AVI Versus RM Recordings --- See http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideosSummary.htm 
    Flash in PowerPoint, Excel, or other presentations with video and audio.  Camtasia works great for both capturing dynamic computer screen presentations in video accompanied by your audio explanations.  Your video files may take up more space than you are allowed on your Web server.  However, you can save them to CD-R or CD-RW disks that can be sold to students for around $1.00 per disk. You can learn more about Camtasia from http://www.techsmith.com/ .  You can make CDs by simply dragging files to a blank CD using Windows Explorer if you first install Easy CD (http://www.roxio.com/en/products/ecdc/ ).  

    For video illustrations and tutorials, see http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideosSummary.htm 

  4. Excel Saved as Webpages Can Add Interactivity In Imaginative Ways
    Suppose that you want to have students make journal entries in a HTML Webpage.  Or suppose you want to see the impact of interest rate swap valuations with changes in forward yield curve estimates. 

    Or suppose you want an interactive Excel chart imported into a HTML Webpage where the chart will change when the reader changes the loan principal, interest rate, or maturity date. 

     
    Saving an XLS file as a HTM file is Quite Simple

     

    • Create an Excel file that has some formulas and/or graphs derived from numbers in cells.  First save the file as an "xls" file.  Then re-open your Excel file. 
       

    • Click on "Save file as" and then choose an "*.htm" file rather than an "xls" file.
       

    • A new screen will appear that has a button called "Publish".  Click on this button.
       

    • A new screen will appear with a box where you can click in the box for "Add interactivity".  Choose a name for the file and then click on the "Publish" button at the bottom of the page.
       

    • You now have an "htm" file that will read interactively on Internet Explorer browsers (not usually other types of browsers like Foxfire).  What was once coded in Visual Basic in Excel is now coded in DHTML that can be read by Internet Explorer.
       

    • Users will be able to change numbers and see the answers change in formulas.  If you have graphs, users can change the numbers and watch the graphs change.
       

    • When you make your original Excel spreadsheet, you should type in instructions guiding users to where they can change the numbers. 
       

    • Your htm version will not read comments that you placed in your xls file as "Comments" and it will not run any macros that you had in your xls file. 
       

    • You can read this htm file in FrontPage and fix it up somewhat with headings and text.  You cannot change your interactive numbers and graphs without going back to your original xls file.



    For illustrations on publishing Excel workbooks, spreadsheets, or charts as interactive Webpages, see http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/dhtml/excel01.htm 

    I have video instructions on how to create these files in the ExcelDHTML.wmv file under ACCT 5342 at  http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/acct5342/ 


  5. JavaScript Calculations and Interactivity
    Try to make your online materials more interactive by saving Excel workbooks as interactive Webpages and use of JavaScipt.  For my JavaScript tutorials, see  http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideos.htm .  

    For more advanced training in Javascripting see
    (http://www.ascendtraining.com/outline.php?id=268)

"Building Programming Tutorials with Codecademy," by Anastasia Salter, Chronicle of Higher Education, February 8, 2012 --- Click Here
http://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/building-programming-tutorials-with-codecademy/38378?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

For those learning to code this year, either for professional reasons or to expand personal horizons, Codecademy has been a popular tool. Jason has written about Codecademy as a platform for code-literacy, and I discussed the Codeyear “new year’s resolution” initiative the site launched in January. Now the platform has expanded even further with the addition of tools that allow any user to create new courses and projects in JavaScript, Python and Ruby.

Codecademy may not be a substitute for more traditional forms of programming instruction, but this new platform does offer possibilities for shaping hybrid learning or building coding familiarity into a course dedicated to another topic, as customized tutorials could supplement face to face instruction. Julie Meloni makes some great points about the pedagogical problems of Codecademy and the question of results: “…it is not teaching you how to code. It is teaching you how to call-and-response, and is not particularly helpful in explaining why you’re responding, why they’re calling, or—most importantly—how to become a composer.” I share a number of these concerns, particularly when Codecademy is the only source of knowledge–and I hope that this new tool affords Codecademy the opportunity to crowdsource new approaches to pedagogy.

There are some great examples of instructional programming tools available for free on the web, such as Scratch, MIT’s young-learner friendly code “building blocks.” (Scratch is just one kid-targeted programming tool: there are other great suggestions at Digital Humanities Q&A.) But these are often starter languages that don’t directly apply to web development or other applications, and thus require additional investment before literacy in more widely-used languages is achieved.

The choice of languages in Codecademy’s toolset focuses on utilitarian scripting languages with a range of potential applications. As Ryan Cordell noted in Ruby for Humanists, Ruby is a great starting language and its inclusion is particularly promising. As Ryan mentioned, there’s already a site for learning programming basics through Ruby tutorials: Hackety Hack. But Codecademy moves a step further with an easy system for building and sharing interactive tutorials.

Continued in article

4Teachers: Teach with Technology --- http://www.4teachers.org/

Bob Jensen's threads on new and old tools are at
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/thetools.htm#NewTools

 

 

  1. Amy Dunbar's Online Pedagogy
    Make a lot more use of online questions and answers that replace the question and answer type of style that you probably use in lectures.  Amy Dunbar uses this approach extensively.  You can read about how she developed her first online course.  See http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#Motivations 

Excel Tips and Helpers (Including Videos)

Excel's New Power Pivot

December 9, 2009 message from AECM@LISTSERV.LOYOLA.EDU

This is a free add-in from Microsoft for Excel 2010

Below are some videos discussing this powerful tool.

http://www.powerpivot.com/videos.aspx 

Richard J. Campbell School of Business 218 N. College Ave. University of Rio Grande Rio Grande, OH 45674
Voice:740-245-7288
http://faculty.rio.edu/campbell

Bob Jensen's video helpers for Excel and MS Access ---
http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/acct5342/


Pivot Tables Should Be Used More Often

Roberta has a new article on pivot tables.
"Make Exel and Instant Know-It All," by Robert Ann Jones, Journal of Accountancy, March 2004, pp. 40-43 --- http://www.aicpa.org/pubs/jofa/mar2004/jones.htm 

You’re sitting at your computer working on a spreadsheet that displays revenue generated by individual salespersons. Your CEO, hovering anxiously at your elbow, asks you for one employee’s third-quarter sales total. You sort the Salesperson column and then the Order Date column. Then you write you write a formula to identify third-quarter sales. Finally, you sum the order amounts and give your boss the number he wants. Just as you congratulate yourself for coming up with the answer in less than three minutes, he says, “OK, now compare that with the results of the whole sales team.”

You roll your eyes in frustration, scrap all the work you just did and re-sort the columns and rows and write a new set of formulas.

There has to be a better way, you think.

And there is. Instead of repeatedly sorting columns and rows and customizing formulas to answer each question your boss asks, you take a new tack: Immediately after you initially put the worksheet data together you can spend a minute or two using Excel’s PivotTables, which will let you easily reconfigure the data with a mouse so you can produce near-instant answers to most any question about them.

Continued in the article

Bob Jensen's Excel Tips and Videos (Pivot Tables and Charts)
Did you know that Microsoft Corporation presents some of its financial history in Excel pivot tables?  You can download the Excel Workbooks containing pivot tables from "Financial History" at  http://www.microsoft.com/msft/tools.htm 

I also found a link to the 1999 Microsoft financial reports --- these had much better Pivot table than the Years 2000-2005 annual reports. Take a look at http://www.microsoft.com/msft/ar99/lts.htm 

The Year 2005 Microsoft Annual Report pivot tables are at http://www.microsoft.com/msft/history.mspx
Scroll down to the bottom of the page.

For extensions into OLAP (including the Microsofts FinWeb),  see http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/XBRLandOLAP.htm 

I prepared a video on how to download and use the Microsoft pivot tables.  The video can be downloaded from PivotMicrosoft.rm

I also have a video illustrating how to make a pivot table at  PivotTable01.rm

In addition, I provide a video illustrating how to make a pivot chart at PivotChart01.rm 

Budgeting with Pivot Tables --- www.accountingweb.co.uk/cgi-bin/item.cgi?id=9748&d=47 
A tutorial on using Excel pivot tables to create a budget, created by David Carter of Accounting Web

Also see http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/assistance/HA010346331033.aspx

See other videos linked at --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideosSummary.htm 


Excel Tips (Goal Seek)
This is a nice feature used by Dr. Hubbard and me when we derived the yield curves consistent with interest rate swap values in Example 5 in Appendix B of FAS 133.  Both an narrative in 133ex05.htm and an Excel workbook 133ex05a.xls  illustrating the derivation of yield curves can be found at  http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/ 

I prepared a video illustrating the use of the Goal Seek utility in Excel at http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/acct5342/ 
The goal seek video is named ExcelGoalSeek.rm 

See other videos linked at --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideosSummary.htm 


Excel Tips (Conditional Formatting)
This is a nice article discussing a feature of Excel that I never tried before reading this article.  

"Vigilant Spreadsheets, by Charles Kelliher and Lois S. Mahoney (both authors are faculty members at the University of Central Florida), Journal of Accountancy, November 2001, pp. 41-45 --- http://www.aicpa.org/pubs/jofa/nov2001/kelliher.htm 

Would you like to be able to scan your company’s financial operations spreadsheet and instantly see which departments are over budget or behind schedule or which accounts receivable are past due? There’s an easy way to do that in Excel, which can automatically flag cells that meet most any condition you establish. You can set the cells to display different formatting flags—colors, font styles, shading, patterns, underlining—with each custom format identifying a specific financial condition. For example, you can program Excel to flag costs that are over budget by displaying them as red; under-budget costs may appear blue.

The Excel function that does this job is conditional formatting. What makes the function especially handy is that it’s not static—that is, when the data in the worksheet change, the cells instantly reflect that by taking on the appropriate formatting.

To set up the function, first highlight the cells you want to include. Then click on Format, Conditional Formatting, which brings up the dialog box shown in exhibit 1 (of the article).

I prepared a video illustrating the use of the Conditional Format utility in Excel at http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/video/acct5342/ 
The conditional formatting video is named ExcelConditionalFormat.rm 

See other videos linked at --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideosSummary.htm 


Illustrations of How to Publish an Interactive Excel Workbooks and Charts in HTML --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/dhtml/excel01.htm 

See other videos linked at --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideosSummary.htm 

Question
How can an Excel spreadsheet be turned into a Flash file?

Answer from Richard Campbell

This is a link to a demo of a product called Excelsius. You can convert an Excel spreadsheet to a highly interactive Flash file. Each of the demos is powered by an underlying Excel file.

http://www.infommersion.com/demos.html 

Richard J. Campbell 
mailto:campbell@rio.edu 


"Spreadsheets With Something Extra," by Lois S. Mahoney and Judith K. Welch, The Journal of Accountancy, February 2003 --- http://www.aicpa.org/pubs/jofa/feb2003/mahoney.htm 

Have you ever created a spreadsheet only to open it a couple of months later to discover you couldn’t remember how to update it or what data it needed? Or, if you prepared the spreadsheet for others in your organization, did they keep calling you for instructions on how to use it? You can eliminate those problems and, as a by-product, ensure the accuracy of spreadsheets by enhancing them with easy-to-create graphic messages and input boxes that can provide reminders, explain various functions of the data tables, help users find and enter the right data and even refuse to let them proceed unless they follow a prescribed procedure. In short, those boxes serve as automated stand-ins for the spreadsheet creator, who can design them to appear whenever a user opens the spreadsheet. Though you have to write message and input boxes in the Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) language, which is built into Microsoft Excel, you will be happy to know it is easy to learn.


Excel Tip: 
Navigating Numerous Sheets in Your Workbook http://www.accountingweb.com/item/97003 


"Link (Dynamically) a Word Document to Excel," by Stanley Zarowin, Journal of Accountancy, August 2004, Page 92 --- http://www.aicpa.org/pubs/jofa/aug2004/tech_qa.htm#Q1 

Question
I often make presentations based on last-minute sales data. It gets really wild when I have to copy last-minute numbers from the spreadsheet and quickly drop them into a Word document for the presentation. I sure hope there’s a better way.

Answer
There is, and it’s fast and simple. I’ll show you how to dynamically link the Excel spreadsheet to your Word document so that when you make any change in the spreadsheet it instantly and automatically will appear in the document. Caveat: Both the spreadsheet and the document must be in the same folder (subdivision).

Go to the article for the remainder of the answer!



JavaScript Illustrations and Coding Explanations

All or some of the illustrations in this document may not work in your browser. Your browser must be enabled for JavaScript. All of the illustrations work in my Netscape Navigator browser. All of my examples work in my Microsoft Internet Explorer, but some will not work in Internet Explorer. I want to acknowledge the help of Tom Hicks for his demonstrations of JavaScript in some of my classes. He provides some examples under (Searching, Tutorials, JavaScript Presentations) at http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~thicks/


Hi Dan,

Fortunately, JavaScript is much, much easier to learn than Java and DHTML. JavaScript is an easy way to add user interactions on your Web documents. The next step up is DHTML, but DHTML is difficult to program and adds about ten times as much code to your document (ToolBook uses DHTML templates and Microsoft uses DHTML for interactive Excel Web documents). I guess the next step up is Java, but you must devote your life if you want to become a Java programmer.

I would begin with my tutorial illustrations at http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideos.htm#JavaScript 

For a more complete set of tutorials, go to http://www.pageresource.com/jscript/  
Note the tutorial listing at http://www.pageresource.com/jscript/index4.htm

Free book --- http://www.cs.brown.edu/courses/bridge/1998/res/javascript/javascript-tutorial.html 

Never trust JavaScript for password protections. These are never as secure as password protections in Java and other more sophisticated codes.

Other suggestions include the following:

http://hotwired.lycos.com/webmonkey/98/03/index0a.html 

http://www.webteacher.com/javascript/ 

http://www.w3schools.com/js/default.asp 

http://www.echoecho.com/javascript.htm 

There are a variety of books that pretty much have the same content. One popular book is Netscape Visual JavaScript For Dummies by Emily A. Vander Veer.

Bob

-----Original Message----- 
From: Dan Gode [mailto:dgode@stern.nyu.edu]  
Sent: Saturday, September 14, 2002 1:48 AM 
To: Jensen, Robert Subject: Javascript

Bob:

What is the best way to learn javascript?

Dan

September 14 reply from Dan Gode with respect to my comment above about password protection.

Thanks a lot for your detailed help. If you want to have fun, check out http://www.elcomsoft.com

Dan


Java and JavaScript Operators and Expressions

A summary of MathObject functions can be found at http://www.webnet.fr/javascript/builtin.htm#1005050

Reserved words are listed at http://wwwinfo.cern.ch/support/training/tutorials/1997/08-19/P029.html

Complete Idiot's Guide to JavaScript, Second Edition

JavaScript Guide

Tom Hicks Illustrations --- Click on (Searching, Tutorials)

 

Danny Goodman's JavaScript Tutorials
I added a very helpful link to Danny Goodman's JavaScript tutorials.  I highly recommend both his free Web tutorials and his great JavaScript book.  Web page designers should definitely learn how easy its become to use JavaScript (not to be confused with Java).    Go to http://www.dannyg.com/javascript/ 

Danny Goodman was featured on the PBS Computer Chronicles television show on October 4, 2001.  He pointed out how there are many JavaScript plug-ins that do not require coding (actually scripting in the case of JavaScript).  With JavaScript you do not have to be a computer programmer like you have to become for Java from Sun Corporation.  JavaScript was actually developed by NetScape for purposes of creating dynamic Web pages.

Also see 

JavaScript Bible --- http://developer.netscape.com/docs/books/idg/jsbible/jsbible.html 
JavaScript Basics --- http://www.webword.com/interviews/goodman.html 
JavaScript Arrays --- http://developer.netscape.com/viewsource/goodman_arrays.html 
Yahoo's JavaScript Helpers --- http://dir.yahoo.com/Computers_and_Internet/Programming_Languages/JavaScript/ 
Bob Jensen's JavaScript Tutorials --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HelpersVideos.htm 

 

Some Trinity University Photographs

 

Miscellaneous Helpers