Tidbits on August 21, 2011
Bob Jensen at Trinity University

To cool you off this week I provide some pictures I took from the windy top Cannon Mountain
These photos are included with a collection of my favorite Wild Rose Pictures
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/tidbits/Roses/Wild/Set01/WildRosesSet01.htm  

 

More of Bob Jensen's Pictures and Stories
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Pictures.htm

 White Mountain News --- http://www.whitemtnews.com/

 

Tidbits on August 21, 2011
Bob Jensen

For earlier editions of Tidbits go to http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/TidbitsDirectory.htm
For earlier editions of New Bookmarks go to http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/bookurl.htm 

Click here to search Bob Jensen's web site if you have key words to enter --- Search Site.
For example if you want to know what Jensen documents have the term "Enron" enter the phrase Jensen AND Enron. Another search engine that covers Trinity and other universities is at http://www.searchedu.com/.


Bob Jensen's past presentations and lectures --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/resume.htm#Presentations   


Bob Jensen's Threads --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/threads.htm

Bob Jensen's Home Page is at http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/




Online Video, Slide Shows, and Audio
In the past I've provided links to various types of music and video available free on the Web. 
I created a page that summarizes those various links --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/music.htm

125 Great Science Videos: From Astronomy to Physics & Psychology ---
http://www.openculture.com/science_videos

TED Video Featuring a Brilliant Physicist:  You Will Be Mesmerized
Geoffrey West: The surprising math of cities and corporations --- Click Here
http://www.ted.com/talks/geoffrey_west_the_surprising_math_of_cities_and_corporations.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TEDTalks_video+%28TEDTalks+%28video%29%29

Video:  Richard Dawkins’ Uncut Interviews with Peter Singer & Big Thinkers --- Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/07/richard_dawkins_uncut_interviews_with_peter_singer_big_thinkers.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

Society for Neuroscience: Neuroscience Education Resources Virtual Encycloportal [pdf, Flash Player]
http://www.ndgo.net/sfn/nerve/

25Great Culture Links --- Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/08/open_culture_beat_no_8_.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

The Last Journey Of A Genius: Richard Feynman Dreams of Tannu Tuva --- Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/08/the_last_journey_of_a_genius.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

Related Content:
Richard Feynman’s Physics Lectures Online

The Pleasure of Finding Things Out

Video
"The Sins of the Renaissance, or The History That Shaped Michele Bachmann’s Worldview ---
Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/08/the_sins_of_the_renaissance.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

Marlon Brando Screen Tests for Rebel Without A Cause (1947) --- Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/08/marlon_brando_screen_tests_for_irebel_without_a_causei.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

Penguins You've Got to Love --- http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=SkY03n0_sD8&vq=medium

Baby moose in sprinkler --- http://www.wimp.com/babymoose

Unbelievable biking --- http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=Cj6ho1-G6tw&vq=medium

"Stanford U. Offers Free Online Course in Artificial Intelligence," by Jie Jenny Zou, Chronicle of Higher Education, August 2, 2011 ---
http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/stanford-u-offers-free-online-course-in-artificial-intelligence/32622

From Stanford University:  "Machine Learning, Introduction to Artificial Intelligence and Introduction to Databases"
Free Online Computer Science Course --- Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/08/stanford_computer_science_courses_this_fall.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

Bob Jensen's threads on free courses, videos, lectures and course materials from prestigious universities ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI

Pakistan during border disputes with India in 1935
Video: Wings over Waziristan
http://airminded.org/2010/04/20/wings-over-waziristan/

Jetman Flight at Grand Canyon West --- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WgdIE2t8QkM&feature=player_embedded

50 Famous Scientists & Academics Speak About God: Part II --- Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/08/50_famous_scientists_academics_speak_about_god_part_ii.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

The Math Guy Radio Archive
Keith Devlin, a Stanford math professor's 78 Tutorials on NPR --- Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/08/the_math_guy_radio_archive.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29 

Video:  VJ Day, Honolulu Hawaii, August 14, 1945 --- http://vimeo.com/5645171

Astonish Me: A Magical Mystery Through Nature’s Hidden Secrets --- Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/08/astonish_me_the_mysteries_nature_holds.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

Colorado State University: Great Western Sugar Digital Collection (note Film Collection)---
http://lib.colostate.edu/archives/greatwestern/

Why dogs cannot become licensed engineers ---
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zt7rXE9vhNY&sns=fb

TED Video on Game Changers
Ric Elias: 3 things I learned while my plane crashed
A passenger on the Hudson River crash landing ---
http://www.ted.com/talks/ric_elias.html
And you might also look at (Randy Pausch) --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/tidbits/2008/tidbits080415.htm

Bob Jensen's threads on open sharing courses, course materials, and videos ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI 

 


Free music downloads --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/music.htm

Klaus Nomi: The Brilliant Performance of a Dying Man (opera) --- Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/08/klaus_nomi_the_brilliant_performance_of_a_dying_man.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

Stile Antico Asks: A Different Kind Of Love? (Classical Concert) --- http://www.npr.org/2011/07/13/137800097/stile-antico-asks-a-different-kind-of-love

Beach Boys - Surfin´USA --- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cqxTUxzOceE&feature=youtube_gdata_plaJ

The Orchestra Of St. Luke's: Home At Last --- http://www.npr.org/2011/07/14/137797043/the-orchestra-of-st-lukes-home-at-last

Web outfits like Pandora, Foneshow, Stitcher, and Slacker broadcast portable and mobile content that makes Sirius look overpriced and stodgy ---
http://www.businessweek.com/technology/content/mar2009/tc20090327_877363.htm?link_position=link2

TheRadio (my favorite commercial-free online music site) --- http://www.theradio.com/
Slacker (my second-favorite commercial-free online music site) --- http://www.slacker.com/

Gerald Trites likes this international radio site --- http://www.e-radio.gr/
Songza:  Search for a song or band and play the selection --- http://songza.com/
Also try Jango --- http://www.jango.com/?r=342376581
Sometimes this old guy prefers the jukebox era (just let it play through) --- http://www.tropicalglen.com/
And I listen quite often to Soldiers Radio Live --- http://www.army.mil/fieldband/pages/listening/bandstand.html
Also note
U.S. Army Band recordings --- http://bands.army.mil/music/default.asp

Bob Jensen listens to music free online (and no commercials) --- http://www.slacker.com/ 


Photographs and Art

Video
The Moon Up Close in High Definition --- Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/08/the_moon_up_close_in_hd.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

Touring the Earth from Space (in HD)

The Best of NASA Space Shuttle Videos (1981-2010)

University of Idaho Historical Photograph Collection --- http://contentdm.lib.uidaho.edu/cdm4/browse.php?CISOROOT=/spec_uihp

Shelburne Museum (paintings, American History) --- http://shelburnemuseum.org/

Hiroshima After the Atomic Bomb in 360 Degrees --- Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/08/hiroshima_after_the_atomic_bomb_in_360.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29
 

Name That Painting! --- Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/07/name_that_painting.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

Natural History Museum - Other Invertebrates --- http://www.nhm.ac.uk/nature-online/life/other-invertebrates/index.html

From Auburn University
Eugene B. Sledge Collection (Historical Photographs) --- http://diglib.auburn.edu/collections/ebsledge/

Going Supernova | Amazing Space Photos --- http://xfinity.comcast.net/slideshow/news-spacepictures/39/#

Exploring Life's Origins: A Virtual Exhibition --- http://exploringorigins.org

Bob Jensen's threads on history, literature and art ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Bookbob2.htm#History


Online Books, Poems, References, and Other Literature
In the past I've provided links to various types electronic literature available free on the Web. 
I created a page that summarizes those various links --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/ElectronicLiterature.htm

25Great Culture Links --- Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/08/open_culture_beat_no_8_.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

50 Famous Scientists & Academics Speak About God: Part II --- Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/08/50_famous_scientists_academics_speak_about_god_part_ii.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

Vladimir Nabokov & Lionel Trilling on Lolita: Another Great Love Story? --- Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/08/vladimir_nabokov_lionel_trilling_on_lolita.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

Free Online Textbooks, Videos, and Tutorials --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/ElectronicLiterature.htm#Textbooks
Free Tutorials in Various Disciplines --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Bookbob2.htm#Tutorials
Edutainment and Learning Games --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/thetools.htm#Edutainment
Open Sharing Courses --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI




Now in Another Tidbits Document
Political Quotations on August 21, 2011
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/tidbits/2011/TidbitsQuotations082111.htm         

The booked National Debt on August 2, 2011 was slightly over $14 trillion ---
U.S. National Debt Clock --- http://www.brillig.com/debt_clock/

The January 2010 Booked National Debt Plus Unbooked Entitlements Debt
The GAO estimated $76 trillion Present Value in January 2010  unless something drastic is done.
Click Here |
 http://www.pgpf.org/~/media/PGPF/Media/PDF/2010/03/fiscalsustainabilityGAONationsLongTermFiscalOutlook03032010.ashx?pid={97E10657-8193-4455-871C-4E7A6A9EE084}
 

There are many ways to describe the federal government’s long-term fiscal challenge. One method for capturing the challenge in a single number is to measure the “fiscal gap.” The fiscal gap represents the difference, or gap, between revenue and spending in present value terms over a certain period, such as 75 years, that would need to be closed in order to achieve a specified debt level (e.g., today’s debt to GDP ratio) at the end of the period.2 From the fiscal gap, one can calculate the size of action needed—in terms of tax increases, spending reductions, or, more likely, some combination of the two—to close the gap; that is, for debt as a share of GDP to equal today’s ratio at the end of the period. For example, under our Alternative simulation, the fiscal gap is 9.0 percent of GDP (or a little over $76 trillion in present value dollars) (see table 2). This means that revenue would have to increase by about 50 percent or noninterest spending would have to be reduced by 34 percent on average over the next 75 years (or some combination of the two) to keep debt at the end of the period from exceeding its level at the beginning of 2010 (53 percent of GDP).

This report looks at the federal government as if it were a business, with the goal of informing the debate about our nation’s financial situation and outlook.
"About USA Inc.," by Mary Meeker, Scribd, February 2011 ---
http://www.scribd.com/doc/49434520/USA-Inc-A-Basic-Summary-of-America-s-Financial-Statements

This report looks at the federal government as if it were a business, with the goal of informing the debate about our nation’s financial situation and outlook. In it, we examine USA Inc.’s income statement and balance sheet. We aim to interpret the underlying data and facts and illustrate patterns and trends in easy-to-understand ways. We analyze the drivers of federal revenue and the history of expense growth, and we examine basic scenarios for how America might move toward positive cash flow.

Thanks go out to Liang Wu and Fred Miller and former Morgan Stanley colleagues whose contributions to this report were invaluable. In addition, Richard Ravitch, Emil Henry, Laura Tyson, Al Gore, Meg Whitman, John Cogan, Peter Orszag and Chris Liddell provided inspiration and insights as the report developed. It includes a 2-page foreword; a 12-page text summary; and 460 PowerPoint slides containing data-rich observations. There’s a lot of material – think of it as a book that happens to be a slide presentation.

We hope the slides in particular provide relevant context for the debate about America’s financials. To kick-start the dialogue, we are making the entire slide portion of the report available as a single work for non-commercial distribution (but not for excerpting, or modifying orcreating derivatives) under the Creative Commons license. The spirit of connectivity and sharing has become the essence of the Internet, and we encourage interested parties to use the slides to advance the discussion of America’s financial present and future. If you would like to add yourown data-driven observations, contribute your insights, improve or clarify ours, please contact usto request permission and provide your suggestions. This document is only a starting point for discussion; the information in it will benefit greatly from your thoughtful input

Jensen Comment
The high quality graphs are especially frightening.

Bob Jensen's threads on entitlements ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Entitlements.htm

 

Peter G. Peterson Website on Deficit/Debt Solutions ---
http://www.pgpf.org/

Bob Jensen's health care messaging updates --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Health.htm




"Stanford U. Offers Free Online Course in Artificial Intelligence," Jie Jenny Zou, Chronicle of Higher Education, August 2, 2011 ---
http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/stanford-u-offers-free-online-course-in-artificial-intelligence/32622

Bob Jensen's threads on open sharing courses, course materials, and videos ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI 


August 2011 T.H.E. Journal (technology in education) ---
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/1105/journal_201108/#/0


"Spotting a hoax using statistics," Understanding Uncertainty, August 3, 2011 --- Click Here
http://understandinguncertainty.org/spotting-hoax-using-statistics?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+UnderstandingUncertainty+%28Understanding+Uncertainty%29


Amazon Flies Through Clouds in Search of Books
"Amazon Sees a Good Read in the Cloud:  Users can now access all of their Amazon Kindle content on anything with a browser," by Erica Naone, MIT's Technology Review, August 10, 2011 ---
http://www.technologyreview.com/web/38298/?nlid=nldly&nld=2011-08-12

Bob Jensen's threads on electronic books are at
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/eBooks.htm


"For Female Faculty, a B-School Glass Ceiling:  Work-life issues, lack of mentorship programs, and sexual discrimination are preventing many women from obtaining tenure and full professorships," by Allison Damast, Business Week, August 8, 2011 ---
http://www.businessweek.com/business-schools/for-female-faculty-a-bschool-glass-ceiling-08082011.html


"New Web Site Offers Career ‘Resilience’ Advice for Female Academics," by Paige Chapman, Chronicle of Higher Education, November 5, 2010 ---
http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/new-web-site-offers-career-resilience-advice-for-women-academics/28044?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en 


"There has actually been a decrease in uncivil behavior in that I grow older and more frightening."
"Chief Targets of Student Incivility Are Female and Young Professors," by Peter Schmidt, Chronicle of Higher Education, May 4, 2010 ---
http://chronicle.com/article/Chief-Targets-of-Student/65396/


From Stanford University
In the United States today, two-thirds of African-American college undergrads are women, and they are going on to excel in business, particularly in entrepreneurship, says visiting scholar Katherine Phillips.

"African-American Women Are Moving Ahead Rapidly," by Michelle Chandler,  Stanford GSB News, June 2011 ---
http://gsb.stanford.edu/news/headlines/2011-african-american-women.html?cmpid=alumni&source=gsbtoday


From Stanford University
"Machine Learning, Introduction to Artificial Intelligence and Introduction to Databases"
Free Online Computer Science Course --- Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/08/stanford_computer_science_courses_this_fall.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

Bob Jensen's threads on free courses, videos, lectures and course materials from prestigious universities ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI


"Accounting Giant KPMG LLP Faces $350 Million Gender Discrimination Class Action," PR Newswire, June 2, 2011 ---
http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/accounting-giant-kpmg-llp-faces-350-million-gender-discrimination-class-action-123021028.html


Question
Why are investors so leery about technology stocks?

Answer
Perhaps too many investors are still remembering how they lost their savings in the late 1990s when the last great technology bubble burst when technology companies that were not earning profits were trying to sell their shares with accounting gimmicks ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/ecommerce/eitf01.htm

Billionaire Marc Andreessen founded Netscape --- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marc_Andreessen

But too much of the debate is still around financial valuation, as opposed to the underlying intrinsic value of the best of Silicon Valley's new companies. My own theory is that we are in the middle of a dramatic and broad technological and economic shift in which software companies are poised to take over large swathes of the economy.
"Why Software Is Eating The World," by Marc Andreessen , The Wall Street Journal, August 20, 2011 ---
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424053111903480904576512250915629460.html?mod=WSJ_hps_sections_lifestyle

This week, Hewlett-Packard (where I am on the board) announced that it is exploring jettisoning its struggling PC business in favor of investing more heavily in software, where it sees better potential for growth. Meanwhile, Google plans to buy up the cellphone handset maker Motorola Mobility. Both moves surprised the tech world. But both moves are also in line with a trend I've observed, one that makes me optimistic about the future growth of the American and world economies, despite the recent turmoil in the stock market.

In short, software is eating the world.

More than 10 years after the peak of the 1990s dot-com bubble, a dozen or so new Internet companies like Facebook and Twitter are sparking controversy in Silicon Valley, due to their rapidly growing private market valuations, and even the occasional successful IPO. With scars from the heyday of Webvan and Pets.com still fresh in the investor psyche, people are asking, "Isn't this just a dangerous new bubble?"

I, along with others, have been arguing the other side of the case. (I am co-founder and general partner of venture capital firm Andreessen-Horowitz, which has invested in Facebook, Groupon, Skype, Twitter, Zynga, and Foursquare, among others. I am also personally an investor in LinkedIn.) We believe that many of the prominent new Internet companies are building real, high-growth, high-margin, highly defensible businesses. [SOFTWARE1] QuickHoney

Today's stock market actually hates technology, as shown by all-time low price/earnings ratios for major public technology companies. Apple, for example, has a P/E ratio of around 15.2—about the same as the broader stock market, despite Apple's immense profitability and dominant market position (Apple in the last couple weeks became the biggest company in America, judged by market capitalization, surpassing Exxon Mobil). And, perhaps most telling, you can't have a bubble when people are constantly screaming "Bubble!"

But too much of the debate is still around financial valuation, as opposed to the underlying intrinsic value of the best of Silicon Valley's new companies. My own theory is that we are in the middle of a dramatic and broad technological and economic shift in which software companies are poised to take over large swathes of the economy.

More and more major businesses and industries are being run on software and delivered as online services—from movies to agriculture to national defense. Many of the winners are Silicon Valley-style entrepreneurial technology companies that are invading and overturning established industry structures. Over the next 10 years, I expect many more industries to be disrupted by software, with new world-beating Silicon Valley companies doing the disruption in more cases than not.

Why is this happening now?

Six decades into the computer revolution, four decades since the invention of the microprocessor, and two decades into the rise of the modern Internet, all of the technology required to transform industries through software finally works and can be widely delivered at global scale.

Over two billion people now use the broadband Internet, up from perhaps 50 million a decade ago, when I was at Netscape, the company I co-founded. In the next 10 years, I expect at least five billion people worldwide to own smartphones, giving every individual with such a phone instant access to the full power of the Internet, every moment of every day.

On the back end, software programming tools and Internet-based services make it easy to launch new global software-powered start-ups in many industries—without the need to invest in new infrastructure and train new employees. In 2000, when my partner Ben Horowitz was CEO of the first cloud computing company, Loudcloud, the cost of a customer running a basic Internet application was approximately $150,000 a month. Running that same application today in Amazon's cloud costs about $1,500 a month.

With lower start-up costs and a vastly expanded market for online services, the result is a global economy that for the first time will be fully digitally wired—the dream of every cyber-visionary of the early 1990s, finally delivered, a full generation later.

Perhaps the single most dramatic example of this phenomenon of software eating a traditional business is the suicide of Borders and corresponding rise of Amazon. In 2001, Borders agreed to hand over its online business to Amazon under the theory that online book sales were non-strategic and unimportant.

Oops.

Today, the world's largest bookseller, Amazon, is a software company—its core capability is its amazing software engine for selling virtually everything online, no retail stores necessary. On top of that, while Borders was thrashing in the throes of impending bankruptcy, Amazon rearranged its web site to promote its Kindle digital books over physical books for the first time. Now even the books themselves are software.

Today's largest video service by number of subscribers is a software company: Netflix. How Netflix eviscerated Blockbuster is an old story, but now other traditional entertainment providers are facing the same threat. Comcast, Time Warner and others are responding by transforming themselves into software companies with efforts such as TV Everywhere, which liberates content from the physical cable and connects it to smartphones and tablets.

Today's dominant music companies are software companies, too: Apple's iTunes, Spotify and Pandora. Traditional record labels increasingly exist only to provide those software companies with content. Industry revenue from digital channels totaled $4.6 billion in 2010, growing to 29% of total revenue from 2% in 2004.

Today's fastest growing entertainment companies are videogame makers—again, software—with the industry growing to $60 billion from $30 billion five years ago. And the fastest growing major videogame company is Zynga (maker of games including FarmVille), which delivers its games entirely online. Zynga's first-quarter revenues grew to $235 million this year, more than double revenues from a year earlier. Rovio, maker of Angry Birds, is expected to clear $100 million in revenue this year (the company was nearly bankrupt when it debuted the popular game on the iPhone in late 2009). Meanwhile, traditional videogame powerhouses like Electronic Arts and Nintendo have seen revenues stagnate and fall.

. . .

Still, we face several challenges.

First of all, every new company today is being built in the face of massive economic headwinds, making the challenge far greater than it was in the relatively benign '90s. The good news about building a company during times like this is that the companies that do succeed are going to be extremely strong and resilient. And when the economy finally stabilizes, look out—the best of the new companies will grow even faster.

Secondly, many people in the U.S. and around the world lack the education and skills required to participate in the great new companies coming out of the software revolution. This is a tragedy since every company I work with is absolutely starved for talent. Qualified software engineers, managers, marketers and salespeople in Silicon Valley can rack up dozens of high-paying, high-upside job offers any time they want, while national unemployment and underemployment is sky high. This problem is even worse than it looks because many workers in existing industries will be stranded on the wrong side of software-based disruption and may never be able to work in their fields again. There's no way through this problem other than education, and we have a long way to go.

Finally, the new companies need to prove their worth. They need to build strong cultures, delight their customers, establish their own competitive advantages and, yes, justify their rising valuations. No one should expect building a new high-growth, software-powered company in an established industry to be easy. It's brutally difficult.

I'm privileged to work with some of the best of the new breed of software companies, and I can tell you they're really good at what they do. If they perform to my and others' expectations, they are going to be highly valuable cornerstone companies in the global economy, eating markets far larger than the technology industry has historically been able to pursue.

Instead of constantly questioning their valuations, let's seek to understand how the new generation of technology companies are doing what they do, what the broader consequences are for businesses and the economy and what we can collectively do to expand the number of innovative new software companies created in the U.S. and around the world.

That's the big opportunity. I know where I'm putting my money.

Continued in article

Jensen Comment
Perhaps too many investors are still remembering how they lost their savings in the late 1990s when the last great technology bubble burst when technology companies that were not earning profits were trying to sell their shares with accounting gimmicks ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/ecommerce/eitf01.htm


SEC fraud investigation record destruction does not pass the smell test,
"SEC Destroys 9000 Fraud Files," by Mike Shedlock, Townhall, August 18, 2011 ---
http://finance.townhall.com/columnists/mikeshedlock/2011/08/18/sec_destroys_9000_fraud_files

Senator Chuck Grassley, Republican of Iowa, says SEC may have destroyed documents

“From what I’ve seen, it looks as if the SEC might have sanctioned some level of case-related document destruction,” said Sen. Chuck Grassley, Republican of Iowa, in a letter to the agency’s chairman, Mary Schapiro.

“It doesn’t make sense that an agency responsible for investigations would want to get rid of potential evidence. If these charges are true, the agency needs to explain why it destroyed documents, how many documents it destroyed over what timeframe, and to what extent its actions were consistent with the law.”

Agency staff “destroyed over 9,000 files” related to preliminary agency investigations, according to a letter sent in July to Grassley, the top Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee, and obtained by MarketWatch.

The allegations were made by SEC enforcement attorney, Darcy Flynn, in a letter to Grassley. Flynn is a current employee, and according to the letter, received a bonus for his past year’s work.

Flynn alleges the SEC destroyed files related to matters being examined in important cases such as Bernard Madoff and a $50 billion Ponzi scheme he operated as well as an investigation involving Goldman Sachs Group Inc. trading in American International Group credit-default swaps in 2009.

Flynn also alleged that the agency destroyed documents and information collected for preliminary investigations at Wells Fargo, Bank of America,, Citigroup, Credit Suisse, Deutsche Bank, Morgan Stanley, and the now-bankrupt Lehman Brothers.

The letter goes into particular detail about Deutsche Bank, the former employer of current SEC enforcement chief Robert Khuzami as well as former enforcement chiefs Gary Lynch and Richard Walker.

The allegations that the SEC destroyed documents were first reported by the Rolling Stone magazine in a report Wednesday.
Senator Grassley's Letter to the SEC --- http://grassley.senate.gov/about/upload/2011-08-17-CEG-to-SEC-MUI.pdf

Bob Jensen's threads on fraud ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Fraud.htm


Teaching Case on What's Holding Women Back in the Workplace

Video ---
http://online.wsj.com/video/pepsi-indra-nooyi-on-balancing-work-and-family/44313778-BE51-4C1A-9323-8757ED876F78.html

From The Wall Street Journal Accounting Weekly Review on April 15, 2011

View from the Top
by: Alan Murray and Indra Nooyi
Apr 11, 2011
Click here to view the full article on WSJ.com
Click here to view the video on WSJ.com 
 

TOPICS: Accounting

SUMMARY: The WSJ held a conference for business and government leaders to examine "...what's holding women back in the workplace-and set out an action plan for creating new opportunities." Participants highlighted in the article include Chief Executive of PepsiCo Indra Nooyi; retired Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor; Marissa Mayer, the first woman engineer at Google; and actress Geena Davis among other highly accomplished women. The program involved presentation results of research by McKiney & Co. , panel discussions, and presentation of task force recommendations for action to solve issues. The focus of this article is an interview with Indra Nooyi about what she did to get to the top. The article begins with a summary of the McKinsey research essentially saying that "...at each stage of [corporate] advancement, men have at least twice the odds of advancing as women" and asks, "How the hell did you do it?"

CLASSROOM APPLICATION: The related video is essentially repeated in the printed article, so this video could be used in a classroom viewing followed by the questions. It is a useful discussion for any business class, particularly entry level accounting classes often taken by all business majors or in MBA classes.

QUESTIONS: 
1. (Introductory) Ms. Nooyi says that to reach the top, women must obtain P&L management responsibilities as men do. What does the term "P&L" mean? What does it mean to have "P&L responsibility"?

2. (Introductory) What are the functions that Ms. Nooyi says are critical? How do those functions relate to business school education?

3. (Introductory) What does Ms. Nooyi say were her biggest sacrifices to advance has she has?

4. (Advanced) Do you think that the statistics regarding women's advancement in corporate America will change? Support your answer.

5. (Advanced) Do you think this interview and other articles contain important lessons for men as well as women? Explain your answer.
 

SMALL GROUP ASSIGNMENT: 
The questions may be discussed in classroom groups following viewing of the Nooyi interview with reporting out, perhaps also including proposed solutions. These solutions then might be compared to the recommendations found in the related WSJ articles covering the conference.

Reviewed By: Judy Beckman, University of Rhode Island
 

RELATED ARTICLES: 
Why Women Rarely Leave Middle Management
by Sue Shellenbarger
Apr 11, 2011
Online Exclusive

From Kindergarten to the Boardroom: The Top Priorities
by WSJ Editors of the Women in the Economy Report
Apr 11, 2011
Page: R7

 

"View from the Top," by: Alan Murray and Indra Nooyi, The Wall Street Journal, April 15, 2011 ---
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704013604576247630655985522.html?mod=djem_jiewr_AC_domainid

Task-force participants at the conference had no end of recommendations for addressing the challenges—and opportunities—facing women in the economy. Give women more bottom-line responsibilities. Hold CEOs accountable. Recruit outside the regular channels. And so on.

To get insight into those issues, The Wall Street Journal's Alan Murray turned to one of the highest-ranking women in corporate America: Indra Nooyi, chairman and chief executive of PepsiCo. Here are edited excerpts from the discussion.

MR. MURRAY: McKinsey research, building on Catalyst research, shows this pipeline in corporate America. The majority of entrants are very high-qualified women—but at each stage of advancement, men have at least twice the odds of advancing as women. How the hell did you do it?

MS. NOOYI: I ask myself that question every day. Especially recently, I've been looking back and thinking about all of the trade-offs and sacrifices I've had to make to get here. My second daughter's going off to college this September, and I say, "My God, I missed so many things about her growing up." Hopefully, my two daughters will be in an environment where it's going to be easier for them.

 

MR. MURRAY: Are you suggesting that it could have been easier, and you still could have achieved the pinnacle you achieved?

INDRA NOOYI 'The harder the business, the bigger the turnaround, put your hand up and say "I want to do it." '

MS. NOOYI: From a family situation, I wanted it all, and it wasn't easy. But I lucked out in one way. I had a husband who said, "You're going to have true gender equality." He was working, I was working, but we juggled our schedules. I also had tremendous support from the extended family.

On the professional side, I had mentors who gave me feedback. For example, I'm a pretty honest and outspoken person. So, you sit in a meeting and somebody presents a three-year, five-year plan. Typically, a lot of the men in the room would say, "You know, that's very interesting. But maybe you could think about this slightly differently."

I just said, "That's crap. This is never going to happen." I'm sure they were all thinking that, but they were saying it in a much more gentle way. I'd come out of the meeting, and one of the guys would pull me aside and say, "You could have said the thing slightly differently. Maybe not the way I said it. Maybe not the way you said it. There might have been a middle ground."

I was very happy that these mentors stepped up and gave me feedback on how to interact in a world that is predominantly male. How can I keep my authenticity, yet adapt to the environment?

 

MR. MURRAY: Can you have an example of where you didn't make the compromise on authenticity?

MS. NOOYI: If my kids called in the middle of a meeting, I took the call. I never said, "Mom's not available." I said, "Excuse me, my kids need to talk to me."

The Leaky Pipe

MR. MURRAY: How do you account for the fact that the pipeline is, to use the adjectives that have been used here, leaky, blocked, broken?

MS. NOOYI: I think the pyramid starts narrowing for everybody, but disproportionately for women because the pipeline wasn't as rich as it needed to be coming up.

I think there might be three reasons why that's so. One, just law of numbers, there weren't enough women in the pipeline. Second, as you move up the organization, there are so many trade-offs and sacrifices to be made. Many women opted out. Third is the environment in many companies, because it's more male dominated. It's changing now, but the senior men belong to the older generation who talk differently and act differently.

Let's say Alan Murray made a presentation, and it was awful. The guys would go to Alan Murray, thump him on the back and say, "Alan, buddy, what happened? You screwed up, man." And Alan says, "You think so? Tell me what I did wrong." There's a locker-room conversation that goes on.

When a woman makes a presentation that's not so good, the men say, "She screwed up, God, she did." That's not locker room; that's heckling the woman.

Women need to go to women and say, "Hey, that presentation wasn't very good. Let me tell you how you could have done it better." But there's a reverse problem. When women give women feedback, women don't take it well. So, there's a funny psychological issue we need to address. Women can be better mentors to women, and women should be more willing to accept women mentors.

The Bottom Line

MR. MURRAY: Let's take a look at the list of priorities. Number one was that too many women are in support roles. In order to see women advance to the top, they needed to be put in positions where they could develop responsibility for the bottom line.

MS. NOOYI: Punching the ticket that you've done P&L management makes a huge difference. But roles like finance or HR or marketing are now critical to the functioning of a company. You can actually exert your influence from those roles. So, ask for a P&L role, get it out as soon as you can—and then figure out how to get into a critical function. But make sure that as you do this job, you expand your own definition of that job.

MR. MURRAY: Another recommendation was to hold CEOs accountable for hiring women in the top jobs and making sure pay was at an equal level.

MS. NOOYI: I agree with all of that, especially the pay parity, which is something we can fix right away. The thing to be very careful about, though, is that if you don't fix the issue of getting talented women in the pipeline, you can't fix the top-management issue overnight. That's a formula for disaster. You put women in there, and they don't succeed, and then it's a worse situation for women.

 

MR. MURRAY: Another idea was to promote women on potential. A phrase that's been repeated around here for the last few days is that men are promoted for potential, and women are promoted on performance. The implication is that there's a higher hurdle that women have to meet.

MS. NOOYI: I think that's changed a lot. The sensitivity, the awareness of these issues is rising, but I think we ought to keep the pressure on. As long as there are no women in the C-suite, these kinds of discussions won't happen.

Continued in article

Bob Jensen's threads on the Glass Ceiling (and in some cases lack thereof in CPA firms) are at
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/BookBob1.htm#careers

Bob Jensen's threads on higher education controversies are at
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HigherEdControversies.htm


Interview With Diana B. Henriques, author of The Wizard of Lies:
"Questions and Answers about 'The Wizard of Lies,' Knowledge@Wharton, August 15, 2011 ---
http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article.cfm?articleid=2827

Bob Jensen's threads on the Madoff Ponzi Fraud Scandal ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/FraudRotten.htm#Ponzi


Now that a landmark study conducted by the Community College Research Center at Columbia University has confirmed that students at two-year campuses perform worse in online courses than in the face-to-face version, perhaps we can move on the important question: What can we do about that?

"Improving Online Success," by Rob Jenkins, Chronicle of Higher Education, August 16, 2011 ---
http://chronicle.com/blogs/onhiring/improving-online-success/29390?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

Jensen Comment
Most of the performance inhibitors apply to onsite and well as online education, but there are some things that can be done to improve online learning for many students. The first task, in my opinion, is to determine if there are unique learning disabilities that should be dealt with separately.

Bob Jensen's threads on Tools and Tricks of the Trade are at
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/thetools.htm


"CGS releases national Professional Science Master’s program data," Council of Graduate Schools, August 9, 2011 ---
http://www.cgsnet.org/portals/0/pdf/N_PR_PSMEandDSurvey2010.pdf

The Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) released the results of its first Professional Science Master’s Enrollment and Degrees Survey, an annual survey documenting applications, enrollments, and degrees awarded. The Professional Science Master’s (PSM) is an innovative, new graduate degree designed to allow students to pursue advanced training in science or mathematics, while simultaneously developing workplace skills highly valued by employers.

"This report shows that nationally, PSM programs appeal to a diverse talent pool," said Debra Stewart, CGS president. She added, "Through the PSM, U.S. citizens, minorities, and women are being drawn to advanced study in STEM fields. Clearly this helps meet U.S. workforce needs."

This new report includes data on applications received and accepted for fall 2010, as well as enrollment data for fall 2010 and degrees awarded during the 2009-10 academic year, from nearly 90% of all PSM programs worldwide. Over 98% of respondents were based in the United States and of those U.S. programs, about 74% were located at public institutions. Key findings include:

Applications:

Nearly 4,400 applications were received for fall 2010 admission and 48% were accepted.

 PSM programs in biology/biotechnology received more applications than programs in other fields of study, constituting 34.1% of all applications received.

First-Time Enrollment:

55.5% of first-time enrollees were men, and 44.5% were women

 58.9% of all first-time PSM students were enrolled full-time while the remainder were part-time students.

 16.8% of first-time enrollees in U.S.-based PSM programs were temporary residents (i.e., international students).

 Among U.S. citizens and permanent residents, 22.2% of first-time enrollees were underrepresented minorities (Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, or American Indian/Alaska Native).

Total Enrollment:

Total enrollment was divided more evenly than first-time enrollment between men (51.1%) and women (48.9%).

 Roughly one in every eight (13.4%) PSM students enrolled in U.S.-based institutions were temporary residents.

 Among U.S. citizens and permanent residents, 29.2% of enrollees in the fall of 2010 were underrepresented minorities.

 Nearly three-quarters (73.3%) of all PSM students were pursuing degrees in computational sciences, biology/biotechnology, or environmental sciences.

Degrees awarded:

Precisely half of the 1,102 PSM degrees awarded by respondents in academic year 2009/10 were awarded to men and half to women.

 One in four (24.1%) graduates of U.S.-based PSM programs were international students.

 Among U.S. citizens and permanent residents, 22.4% of PSM graduates in 2009/10 were underrepresented minorities.

 Nearly six in ten (57.7%) PSM degrees awarded in 2009/10 were in biology/biotechnology and computational sciences.

 Men earned the majority of the PSM degrees granted in mathematics and statistics, physics and geological sciences, and computational sciences.

 Women earned the majority of the degrees granted in "other" fields (which includes chemistry, forensic science, nanoscience, and national defense), medical-related sciences, and biology/biotechnology.

The 2011 PSM applications, enrollments and degrees data will be released

 

Continued in the full report ---
http://www.sciencemasters.com/portals/0/pdfs/PSM_Enrollment_and_Degrees_Report_2011.pdf

Jensen Comment
Probably less than half the masters degree programs in business world wide have the prestigious AACSB International accreditation ---

For comparative purposes, however, here are some AACSB data links:

Global Business School Characteristics

Global Business School Student Data

Global Business School Faculty and Administration Data

For example, whereas 50% of the science masters degree graduates are female, in the MBA arena nearly 2/3 are male. Females are gaining but the pace of gain is very slight.


"The master's as the new bachelor's," Pappano, The New York Times, July 24, 2011
Thank you James Martin for the heads up ---
http://maaw.info/ArticleSummaries/ArtSumPappano2011.htm


August 11. 2011 message from Scott Bonacker

Software for managing multiple monitors

An article in TechRepublic -

http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/window-on-windows/manage-multiple-displays-
in-windows-with-actual-multiple-monitors/4738


(or http://goo.gl/Mlfol  if the long link is broken)

-  lists reviews a monitor management app by actualtools, and provides links
to information about four more.


Here are all five:

http://www.actualtools.com/multiplemonitors/

http://www.displayfusion.com/

http://www.realtimesoft.com/ultramon/overview/

http://www.mediachance.com/free/multimon.htm

http://www.maxivista.com/multi-monitor.htm

I use Ultramon myself and like it just fine.

Scott Bonacker CPA
Springfield, MO


The Demise of Guys
Questions
Why do guys prefer male bonding over female mating?
Why are guys 30% more likely to drop out of college?
Why do guys underperform relative to women at all levels of schooling?
Why are males 2/3 more likely to need special education?
Why are men much more likely to become addicted to drugs and porn?
Why do accounting firms hire more women than men?

Phil Zimbardo is one of the most successful psychology professors in the world and one of this discipline's most well-known authors ---
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phil_zimbardo

TED Video
"The Demise of Guys," by Phil Zimbardo, TED --- Click Here
http://www.ted.com/talks/zimchallenge.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TEDTalks_video+%28TEDTalks+%28video%29%29

Jensen Comment
This video raises more questions than it answers. But then the answers are extremely complicated and confounded by complicated changes in society and family life over time.


Question
What's all this crap about "Do No Evil?"

In the past when I entered 'Newsweek Magazine" into the Advanced Search site of Google, the first items were Newsweek Magazine and a page on how to subscribe to Newsweek ---
http://www.google.com/advanced_search

Now when I enter  'Newsweek Magazine" in this Google search engine the first item to come up is a Daily Beast site.

This is most likely because Daily Beast pays more for advertising on Google than Newsweek Magazine.

Question
What's all this crap about "Do No Evil?"

Previous messaging on this issue that disturbs me greatly about Google is shown below:

"Colleges Fight Google Ads That Reroute Prospective Students," by Josh Keller, Chronicle of Higher Education, July 31, 2011 ---
http://chronicle.com/article/Colleges-Fight-Google-Ads-That/128414/?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

August 5, 2011 reply from Bob Jensen

Hi David,

The issue really is more about the ethics of buying link priorities over fine, usually better, universities who do not pay to advertise on Google. This practice by Google smells of a shakedown to force all universities to buy advertising on Google.

What's really wrong?
Google built its search integrity by not giving search priorities to its advertisers. Google beat down Yahoo in the early years because Yahoo was giving the top search hits to its advertisers who actually paid for being at or near the top of the hit list. At least Yahoo did not hide its search priorities.

The real problem is that a leading search engine thereby forces virtually everybody to buy its advertising in order to get near the top or the search list and/or being rerouted from Stanford University to Kaplan University or the University of Phoenix.

Google is "Doing Evil" with what smells like extortion.


Another evil is that this shakedown leads you and me to junk hits having priority over hits we are really seeking.

But this practice will increase competition. Other search engines built on top of Google will code ways of filtering out the junk advertiser hits to make searches more effective and efficient on their sites. Bing, Bing, Bing!

Bob Jensen


Party School Rankings:  Princeton Review Versus Playboy ---
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Party_school#Criticism_of_party_school_lists

Thee following table shows a comparison between the top 10 colleges in the 2011 Playboy ranking and the 2011–12 Princeton Review ranking.

# Princeton Review Playboy
1 Ohio University University of Colorado at Boulder
2 University of Georgia Pennsylvania State University
3 University of Mississippi Arizona State University
4 University of Iowa University of Western Ontario
5 University of California, Santa Barbara University of Texas at Austin
6 West Virginia University University of Wisconsin
7 Pennsylvania State University University of Georgia
8 Florida State University University of Tennessee at Knoxville
9 University of Florida University of Central Florida
10 University of Texas at Austin University of California, Santa Barbara

 

Jensen Comment
And the winners are Georgia, Texas, Penn State, and UC Santa Barbara since they made the Top 10 in both lists.


"Enrollments Plunge at Many For-Profit Colleges," by Rachel Wiseman, Chronicle of Higher Education, August 16, 2011 ---
http://chronicle.com/article/Enrollments-Plunge-at-Many/128711/?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

. . .

Bucking the Trend

While some of the biggest for-profit colleges saw declines, a few showed enrollment increases. Total enrollment in the American Public University System, which charges $250 per undergraduate credit—less than many of its proprietary peers do—grew 28 percent in the quarter ending June 30. The system is operated by American Public Education Inc.

With a similarly low price point, Bridgepoint Education saw a slight uptick in new-student enrollment. But whether enrollment will continue to climb is open to question, given the company's revelation in May that New York's attorney general is investigating its business practices.

How for-profit enrollments will trend in the future is "difficult to call," said Robert L. Craig, a managing director of the investment bank Stifel Nicolaus. He says external factors such as the economy and federal student aid will affect how well those institutions fare. He expects the for-profit sector will continue to grow in the long term, as emphasis is placed on expanding higher education to a greater portion of Americans and as traditional options for acquiring a degree reach capacity in some states.

But some analysts are concerned that if institutions do not lower their prices, they risk losing applicants and profits. "A lot of these institutions have a cost system that is going to be untenable for the consumer," said Mr. Safalow, as more traditional universities enter into online education and the number of available applicants plateaus. "This is an industry that is closer to saturation than I think most people realize."

 

Jensen Comment
The big exception is American Public Education (University) Inc. that was bolstered when Wal-Mart elected to heavily subsidize employees who elect to further their educations from APE.

Does this pass the Academy’s smell test?
"Wal-Mart Employees Get New College Program—Online," by Marc Parry, Chronicle of Higher Education, June 3, 2010 ---
http://chronicle.com/blogPost/Wal-Mart-Employees-Get-New/24504/?sid=at&utm_source=at&utm_medium=en

The American Public University System has been described as a higher-education version of Wal-Mart: a publicly traded corporation that mass-markets moderately priced degrees in many fields.

Now it's more than an analogy. Under a deal announced today, the for-profit online university will offer Wal-Mart workers discounted tuition and credit for job experience.

Such alliances are nothing new; see these materials from Strayer and Capella for other examples. But Wal-Mart is the country's largest retailer. And the company is pledging to spend $50-million over three years to help employees cover the cost of tuition and books beyond the discounted rate, according to the Associated Press.

"What's most significant about this is that, given that APU is very small, this is a deal that has the potential to drive enrollments that are above what investors are already expecting from them," Trace A. Urdan, an analyst with Signal Hill Capital Group, told Wired Campus. "Which is why the stock is up."

Wal-Mart workers will be able to receive credit—without having to pay for it—for job training in subjects like ethics and retail inventory management, according to the AP.

Wal-Mart employs 1.4 million people in the U.S. Roughly half of them have a high-school diploma but no college degree, according to The New York Times. A department-level manager would end up paying about $7,900 for an associate degree, factoring in the work credits and tuition discount, the newspaper reported.

“If 10 to 15 percent of employees take advantage of this, that’s like graduating three Ohio State Universities,” Sara Martinez Tucker, a former under secretary of education who is now on Wal-Mart’s external advisory council, told the Times.

 

"News Analysis: Is 'Wal-Mart U.' a Good Bargain for Students?" by Marc Parry, Chronicle of Higher Education, June 13, 2010 ---
http://chronicle.com/article/Is-Wal-Mart-U-a-Good/65933/?sid=at&utm_source=at&utm_medium=en

There might have been a Wal-Mart University.

As the world's largest retailer weighed its options for making a big splash in education, executives told one potential academic partner that Wal-Mart Stores was considering buying a university or starting its own.

"Wal-Mart U." never happened. Instead, the retailer chose a third option: a landmark alliance that will make a little-known for-profit institution, American Public University, the favored online-education provider to Wal-Mart's 1.4 million workers in the United States.

A closer look at the deal announced this month shows how American Public slashed its prices and adapted its curriculum to snare a corporate client that could transform its business. It also raises one basic question: Is this a good bargain for students?

Adult-learning leaders praise Wal-Mart, the nation's largest private employer, for investing in education. But some of those same experts wonder how low-paid workers will be able to afford the cost of a degree from the private Web-based university the company selected as a partner, and why Wal-Mart chose American Public when community-college options might be cheaper. They also question how easily workers will be able to transfer APU credits to other colleges, given that the university plans to count significant amounts of Wal-Mart job training and experience as academic credit toward its degrees.

For example, cashiers with one year's experience could get six credits for an American Public class called "Customer Relations," provided they received an "on target" or "above target" on their last performance evaluation, said Deisha Galberth, a Wal-Mart spokeswoman. A department manager's training and experience could be worth 24 credit hours toward courses like retail ethics, organizational fundamentals, or human-resource fundamentals, she said.

Altogether, employees could earn up to 45 percent of the credit for an associate or bachelor's degree at APU "based on what they have learned in their career at Wal-Mart," according to the retailer's Web site.

Janet K. Poley, president of the American Distance Education Consortium, points out that this arrangement could saddle Wal-Mart employees with a "nontransferable coupon," as one blogger has described it.

"I now see where the 'trick' is—if a person gets credit for Wal-Mart courses and Wal-Mart work, they aren't likely to be able to transfer those to much of anyplace else," Ms. Poley wrote in an e-mail to The Chronicle. Transferability could be important, given the high turnover rate in the retail industry.

Inside the Deal Wal-Mart screened 81 colleges before signing its deal with American Public University. One that talked extensively with the retailer was University of Maryland University College, a 94,000-student state institution that is a national leader in online education. According to University College's president, Susan C. Aldridge, it was during early discussions that Wal-Mart executives told her the company was considering whether it should buy a college or create its own college.

When asked to confirm that, Ms. Galberth said only that Wal-Mart "brainstormed every possible option for providing our associates with a convenient and affordable way to attend college while working at Wal-Mart and Sam's Club," which is also owned by Wal-Mart Stores. "We chose to partner with APU to reach this goal. We have no plans to purchase a brick-and-mortar university or enter the online education business," she said.

The Wal-Mart deal was something of a coming-out party for American Public University. The institution is part of a 70,000-student system that also includes American Military University and that largely enrolls active-duty military personnel. As American Public turned its attention to luring the retail behemoth, it was apparently able to be more flexible than other colleges and willing to "go the extra mile" to accommodate Wal-Mart, said Jeffrey M. Silber, a stock analyst and managing director of BMO Capital Markets. That flexibility included customizing programs. APU has a management degree with courses in retail, and its deans worked with Wal-Mart to add more courses to build a retail concentration, said Wallace E. Boston, the system's president and chief executive.

It also enticed Wal-Mart with a stable technology platform; tuition prices that don't vary across state lines, as they do for public colleges; and online degrees in fields that would be attractive to workers, like transportation logistics.

Unlike American Public, Maryland's University College would not put a deep discount on the table.

Credit for Wal-Mart work was also an issue, Ms. Aldridge said.

"We feel very strongly that any university academic credit that's given for training needs to be training or experience at the university level," Ms. Aldridge said. "And we have some very set standards in that regard. And I'm not certain that we would have been able to offer a significant amount of university credit for some of the on-the-job training that was provided there."

Awarding credit for college-level learning gained outside the classroom is a long-standing practice, one embraced by about 60 percent of higher-education institutions, according to the most recent survey by the Council for Adult And Experiential Learning. A student might translate any number of experiences into credit: job training, military service, hobbies, volunteer service, travel, civic activities.

Pamela J. Tate, president and chief executive of the council, said what's important isn't the percentage of credits students get from prior learning—a number that can vary widely. What's important, she said, is that students can demonstrate knowledge. Workers might know how they keep the books at a company, she explained. But that doesn't automatically mean they've learned the material of a college accounting course.

Karan Powell, senior vice president and academic dean at American Public University system, said credit evaluation at her institution "is a serious, rigorous, and conservative process." But will the credits transfer? "Every college or university establishes its own transfer-credit policies as they apply to experiential learning as well as credit from other institutions," she said in an e-mail. "Therefore, it would depend on the school to which a Wal-Mart employee wanted to transfer."

Affordable on $12 an Hour? Then there's the question of whether low-wage workers will be able to afford the degrees. One of the key features of this deal is the discount that Wal-Mart negotiated with American Public.

"Wal-Mart is bringing the same procurement policies to education that it brings to toothpaste," said John F. Ebersole, president of Excelsior College, a distance-learning institution based in New York.

American Public University's tuition was already cheap by for-profit standards and competitive with other nonprofit college options. It agreed to go even cheaper for Wal-Mart, offering grants equal to 15 percent of tuition for the company's workers. Those employees will pay about $11,700 for an associate degree and $24,000 for a bachelor's degree.

But several experts pointed out that public colleges might provide a more affordable option.

The Western Association of Food Chains, for example, has a partnership with 135 community colleges in the western United States to offer an associate degree in retail management completely online, Ms. Tate said. Many of the colleges also grant credit for prior learning. Though the tuition varies by state, the average tuition cost to earn the degree is about $4,500, she said. By contrast, she said, the American Public degree is "really expensive" for a front-line worker who might make $12 an hour.

"What I couldn't figure out is how they would be able to afford it unless Wal-Mart was going to pay a substantial part of the tuition," she said. "If not, then what you've got is this program that looks really good, but the actual cost to the person is a whole lot more than if they were going to go to community college and get their prior learning credits assessed there."

How the retailer might subsidize its employees' education is an open question. In announcing the program, Wal-Mart pledged to spend up to $50-million over the next three years "to provide tuition assistance and other tools to help associates prepare for college-level work and complete their degrees."

Alicia Ledlie, the senior director at Wal-Mart who has been shepherding this effort, told The Chronicle in an e-mail that the company is "right now working through the design of those programs and how they will benefit associates," with more details to be released later this summer.

One thing is clear: The deal has a big financial impact on American Public. Wal-Mart estimates that about 700,000 of its 1.4 million American employees lack a college degree.

Sara Martinez Tucker, a former under secretary of education who is now on Wal-Mart's external advisory council, suggests 10 or 15 percent of Wal-Mart associates could sign up.

"That's 140,000 college degrees," she told The Chronicle. "Imagine three Ohio State Universities' worth of graduates, which is huge in American higher education."

 

Jensen Comment
This Wal-Mart Fringe Benefit Should Be Carefully Investigated by Employees
It does not sit well with me!

"Inspector General Keeps the Pressure on a Regional Accreditor," by Eric Kelderman, Chronicle of Higher Education, May 27, 2010 ---
http://chronicle.com/article/Inspector-General-Keeps-the/65691/?sid=at&utm_source=at&utm_medium=en

The inspector general of the U.S. Department of Education has reaffirmed a recommendation that the department should consider sanctions for the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, one of the nation's major regional accrediting organizations. In a report this week, the Office of Inspector General issued its final recommendations stemming from a 2009 examination of the commission's standards for measuring credit hours and program length, and affirmed its earlier critique that the commission had been too lax in its standards for determining the amount of credit a student receives for course work.

The Higher Learning Commission accredits more than 1,000 institutions in 19 states. The Office of Inspector General completed similar reports for two other regional accreditors late last year but did not suggest any sanctions for those organizations.

Possible sanctions against an accreditor include limiting, suspending, or terminating its recognition by the secretary of education as a reliable authority for determining the quality of education at the institutions it accredits. Colleges need accreditation from a federally recognized agency in order to be eligible to participate in the federal student-aid programs.

In its examination of the Higher Learning Commission, the office looked at the commission's reaccreditation of six member institutions: Baker College, DePaul University, Kaplan University, Ohio State University, the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, and the University of Phoenix. The office chose those institutions—two public, two private, and two proprietary institutions—as those that received the highest amounts of federal funds under Title IV, the section of the Higher Education Act that governs the federal student-aid programs.

It also reviewed the accreditation status of American InterContinental University and the Art Institute of Colorado, two institutions that had sought initial accreditation from the commission during the period the office studied.

The review found that the Higher Learning Commission "does not have an established definition of a credit hour or minimum requirements for program length and the assignment of credit hours," the report says. "The lack of a credit-hour definition and minimum requirements could result in inflated credit hours, the improper designation of full-time student status, and the over-awarding of Title IV funds," the office concluded in its letter to the commission's president, Sylvia Manning.

More important, the office reported that the commission had allowed American InterContinental University to become accredited in 2009 despite having an "egregious" credit policy.

In a letter responding to the commission, Ms. Manning wrote that the inspector general had ignored the limitations the accreditor had placed on American InterContinental to ensure that the institution improved its standards, an effort that had achieved the intended results, she said. "These restrictions were intended to force change at the institution and force it quickly."

Continued in article

Jensen Comment
The most successful for-profit universities advertise heavily about credibility due to being "regionally accredited." In some cases this accreditation was initially bought rather than achieved such as by buying up a small, albeit still accredited, bankrupt not-for-profit private college that's washed up on the beach. This begs the question about how some for-profit universities maintain the spirit of accreditation acquired in this manner.

Bob Jensen's threads on assessment are at
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/assess.htm

Bob Jensen's threads on For-Profit Universities Operating in the Gray Zone of Fraud ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HigherEdControversies.htm#ForProfitFraud

Bob Jensen's threads on distance education alternatives (some for-profit universities have onsite as well as online programs) ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Crossborder.htm

 


Colleges That Cheat

"Hundreds of Chicago State Students Were Ineligible for Aid," Inside Higher Ed, August 11, 2011 ---
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2011/08/11/qt#267507

Hundreds of Chicago State University students received state financial aid even though they lacked the grades needed to remain enrolled, The Chicago Tribune reported. The Tribune reported last month about Chicago State failing to enforce its rules about suspending those who fail to meet minimal grade requirements, but the information about state financial aid emerged Wednesday at a state hearing.

"In Lawsuits, Graduates of 2 Law Schools Accuse Their Alma Maters of Inflating Employment Data," by Ryan Brown, Chronicle of Higher Education, August 10, 2011 --- http://chronicle.com/article/In-Lawsuits-Graduates-Accuse/128596/

Bob Jensen's threads on cheating ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Plagiarism.htm

Colleges That Cheat in Athletics ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HigherEdControversies.htm#Athletics


2011 Edition of The College of 2020:  Students
Chronicle of Higher Education
Price:  $75
https://www.chronicle-store.com/Store/ProductDetails.aspx?CO=CQ&ID=76319&PK=N7N11AD&=1


"Cheating: The Experts Weigh In," by: Louis Lavelle, Business Week, July 26, 2011 ---
http://www.businessweek.com/bschools/blogs/mba_admissions/archives/2011/07/cheating_the_experts_weigh_in.html
Thanks to David Albrecht for the heads up.

On July 18, the Bloomberg Businessweek Getting In blog publicized the story of NYU Stern Professor Panos Ipeirotis, who caught 20 percent of his class cheating and found the effort he put into rooting out the cheaters was not worth it. In the future, Ipeirotis said he would assign projects requiring more original thought to creatively channel the energies of his highly competitive students.

Some of those who commented on the blog faulted Ipeirotis, blamed the cheating on the Stern grading curve, or said that cheating was common at many schools. Bloomberg Businessweek asked two ethics experts about the views they expressed.

David Callahan is a senior fellow at Demos, a public policy organization in New York. He has a Ph.D. in politics and has written extensively about ethics on his blog for years and in his book, The Cheating Culture, published in 2004.

John Gallagher is an associate dean for the executive MBA program at Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business, where one of his responsibilities is to prosecute honor code violations. Duke dealt with its own cheating scandal in 2007. It’s use of the episode to reinforce the honor code was applauded by many.

Below is an edited transcript of their interview with reporter Kiah Lau Haslett.

What was your reaction to this story?

David Callahan: I’m not surprised at the high level of cheating among business students; research tells us that business students cheat at among the highest rates of students. I think that a lot of professors often get a lot of pushback for exposing cheating. A professor at the University of Central Florida reported a lot of cheating and he was subjected to a lot of attacks to him as a teacher, that it was somehow his fault. I think there’s a lot of rationalization of students about cheating: They don’t find it surprising and people are cynical. They assume there’s a lot of cheating and it’s not a big deal.

Why do students plagiarize?

David Callahan: I think you have to look at the real, underlying causes. Students are extremely anxious today, they’re incurring record levels of debt to go to college, and they’re relying on scholarships and grants dependent upon maintaining a certain GPA. College is no longer the last stop; now it’s a stepping-stone to a professional school and graduate school. College transcripts and GPA really matter. On the one hand, there’s more pressure than ever before to cheat, and on the other hand there’s a tremendous amount of cynicism. When a professor complains about cheating and points it out, students push back in a cynical way and say, “This is commonplace. What’s the big deal?” Or they push back in a defensive way and say, “The pressure’s on me to get good grades and cheating is one way to do it.”

What are some assignments that make it easy for students to cheat or plagiarize? What are some assignments where it's harder to cheat?

John Gallagher: If you are giving a proctored exam in a closed room, there's going to be far less opportunity than if you are giving an assignment that requires people to do analysis and make recommendations. Many institutions use case studies, so it's likely that somewhere you can find someone who has done an analysis of the case. I think that any time you ask students to personalize their work, talking about its applications and concept, it's very much more difficult. No one has written that material and it's unique.

What is the professor's role or responsibility to ensure students don't cheat?

David Callahan: The responsibility on professors in this day and age is to teach in such a way that makes it harder for students to cheat. They need to take seriously the responsibility to reduce the amount of cheating. It doesn't just fall on students to not cheat. Lots of professors feel overburdened as it is, in terms of their teaching obligations. Many don't want to make the extra effort in reducing cheating, and unfortunately they have to make that effort.

Is this the curve's fault?

David Callahan: A zero-sum game where students have to compete against other students exacerbates the situation. Nobody wants to be the chump who's honest when everyone else is cheating and you're in direct competition for grades.

John Gallagher: I don't think so. [At Fuqua] we have a recommended grade distribution that our professors follow, but they are never required to give a low pass or a failing grade. There's no need for students to cheat. There are all kinds of people who cheat for all kinds of reasons. I don't think that you would ever say that the primary factor or force that leads students to cheat is there's some kind of a curve.

What should the punishment be for students caught cheating? Maximum? Minimum?

David Callahan: For the most part there's typically very little punishment for cheaters, which is one reason why there's so much cheating. You typically get punished with a slap on the wrist: flunk a paper, flunk a class. Rarely are they suspended or expelled. Of course, there are different gradations of punishment. But I think there needs to be more. One incentive to cheat is that the punishment is lax or minimal. If there's no punishment there's no deterrent.

John Gallagher: For us, the maximum punishment is rescinding the degree. We've had five cases of alumni where it was later discovered they cheated in one of their courses and their degrees were revoked. The next is that people are simply expelled from the university and there is a notation on their official university transcript stating they were dismissed from the university because of a cheating conviction.

The least severe punishment I have ever seen is mandatory failing of the course, but in our particular world that has significant ramifications. Anyone who fails a course must take a mandatory one-year leave of absence before being allowed to return to retake the failed course and finish the program. Everyone who graduates must have a minimum 3.0 GPA. If you can imagine a five-semester program with a conviction of cheating the fourth semester and you were given a grade of F in a course, looking at the number of courses remaining, it might be mathematically impossible to maintain a GPA and you'd be academically dismissed.

What do you do when a cheating conviction happens? What happens to the student?

John Gallagher: I never speak to companies [who sponsor EMBA students] because of student privacy issues, but I have witnessed the impact of convictions on students. In my experience, companies treat this very severely. It's a severe violation of ethics and it is not something that I would ever expect a company would ignore or have a wink-wink-nudge-nudge attitude toward at all. In many cases, these companies are paying students' tuition and if they're not financially involved, then they've given them the time they need. They are stakeholders in the student's education, and now the student is caught in an extremely awkward situation having to explain the circumstances. It is very serious. It can destroy someone's career and professional reputation.

What should a school do when this happens?

Continued in article

Bob Jensen's threads on Professors Who Let Students Cheat ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Plagiarism.htm#RebeccaHoward

Bob Jensen's threads on plagiarism are at
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Plagiarism.htm


"U. of Utah Fires Faculty Member Deemed to Have Plagiarized," Inside Higher Ed, August 19, 2011 ---
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2011/08/19/qt#268194

The University of Utah has fired a political science professor after concluding that he engaged in a "pattern of plagiarism," the Salt Lake Tribune reported. The newspaper said that a faculty panel determined that Bahman Bakhtiari, former head of the university's Middle East Center, had committed plagiarism, but that the panel recommended against dismissing him. But according to documents provided to the Tribune, it said, Utah's interim president overruled the faculty body. "Plagiarism -- holding out the work of another as one’s own -- strikes at the very core of academic integrity," the newspaper quoted the interim president, Lorris Betz, as writing in a June 30 letter. "The only appropriate sanction in this case is dismissal, which is necessary to preserve the academic integrity of the institution and to restore public confidence in the university." Bakhtiari has contended that the overlap in his work and that of others was unintentional and too limited to qualify as a pattern.

Bob Jensen's threads on Professors Who Cheat and Professors Who Let Students Cheat ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Plagiarism.htm#RebeccaHoward


Some years back the Texas State Board of Public Accountancy (TSBPA) declared war on distance education by requiring a minimum of five semester courses (15 credits) of accounting onsite instead of online ---
http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/temp/TexasBigBrother.htm

Large universities in Texas such as the University of Texas and Texas A&M have extensive online degree programs in such areas in science and engineering, but not in accountancy where very large and highly-rated onsite accounting degree programs have shown virtually no interest in reaching out to students who are unable to attend classes on campus. In fact, I've suspected for a long time that these major universities have pressured the TSBPA to discourage distance education.

Western Governors University --- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_Governors_University

WGU is a competency-based online university where course instructors do not assign grades. Instead the grading is competency based much like professional certification examinations such as the CPA Examination and medical board examinations ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/assess.htm#ComputerBasedAssessment
The reason why is explained at
http://chronicle.com/blogs/afterword/2011/08/05/what-if-professors-arent-good-at-grading/?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

"WGU Lassoes Texas," by Steve Kolowich, Inside Higher Ed, August 4, 2011 ---
http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2011/08/04/governor_perry_partners_with_western_governors_university

Western Governors University continued to live up to its name on Wednesday, as Texas Governor Rick Perry announced a partnership with the fast-growing online institution — and was promptly showered with praise from nearly everyone.

Western Governors, a regionally accredited, nonprofit university founded in 1997 by 18 politicians who held that office at that time, represents an alternative model of higher education that has garnered both praise and skepticism.

Aimed at working adults (the average student is 36), Western Governors confers bachelors and master’s degrees based on a student’s ability to demonstrate skills. There are no classrooms and no professors. Students learn online and mostly on their own, with light guidance from their advisers. They take proctored tests at local testing centers whenever they feel they are ready. Students pay tuition — between $2,890 and $4,250, depending on the program — every six months until they graduate, which 40 percent of them do within four years. (First-time, full-time students are considerably less successful, graduating at a 22 percent rate.)

The partnership with Texas will create a state-branded version of Western Governors called WGU-Texas. Texas is the third state to create a local version of Western Governors, which is based in Salt Lake City, Utah; Indiana Governor Mitch Daniels created WGU-Indiana last summer, and the Washington State legislature voted WGU-Washington into existence earlier this year.

Like Indiana and Washington, Texas will not allocate any money out of its state budget to Western Governors, which supports itself based on tuition. However, a Western Governors spokeswoman says the university is currently working with Texas officials to allow Texas residents to spend in-state financial aid grants on the Utah-based institution.

Amid deep cuts to public higher education budgets, Governor Perry earlier this year challenged state institutions to come up with some way to offer a four-year degree program for the total price of $10,000. Alas, WGU-Texas is not the answer to that challenge, said Catherine Frazier, a Perry spokeswoman. The average Western Governors graduate earns a degree in 30 months, or five pay periods; including fees, that means $14,735 for the least expensive degrees (information technology and business), and $21,890 for the most expensive (nursing pre-licensure).

“But, certainly, having this affordable option does prove that a degree can be offered by an institution at an affordable price,” Frazier said.

In its effort to expand into various states, Western Governors has faced criticism from some educators, particularly in Washington state. “[B]rain research demonstrates that real learning requires students to struggle with difficult material under the consistent guidance of good teachers,” wrote Johann Neem, an associate professor of history at Western Washington University, in an April op-ed for The Seattle Times. “WGU denies students these opportunities. In fact, its advertisements pander to prospective students by offering them credit for what they already know rather than promising to teach them something new.”

But advocates say the Western Governors model has its place in the constellation of state higher education systems. For adult students who possess the knowledge and skills to bypass a chunk of the curriculum — either because they have some prior college or because they have picked it up in their working lives — the competency-based model is a good way to avoid the tedium and expense of sitting through redundant classes, the Center for Adult and Experiential Learning has said.

“The idea is that these adult learners will bring certain skills and knowledge to the table and that they [will] be able to use them to accelerate progress toward an academic degree and advance in the workforce,” said Dominic Chavez, a spokesman for the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, in an e-mail. “While students will typically be able to gain course credit for having specific knowledge in certain areas, students reach a point at which they acquire new knowledge and skills beyond their existing levels,” Chavez said. “These are the skills that take them to the next level and that offer increased workforce opportunities.”

The WGU-Texas announcement met with glowing praise elsewhere. The partnership “will help address our state's key workforce needs while offering affordable career and continuing education opportunities to Texans over 30," said State Senator Judith Zaffirini, a Democrat who chairs the state senate’s higher education committee, in a statement.

“This low-cost alternative will expand access to more Texans, engaging our diverse student population and upholding our statewide commitment to help more students reach their academic and lifelong goals,” wrote the Texas Coalition for Excellence in Higher Education, a group of former administrative heavyweights from the Texas higher ed system who have challenged much of Governor Perry's higher education agenda.

Rey Garcia, president of the Texas Association of Community Colleges, said his organization was planning a statewide articulation agreement with WGU-Texas that would make it easy for students to finish their bachelor’s degrees at Western Governors after two years at community college. “The traditional universities don’t make it terribly easy for students with an applied science degree [at a community college] to transfer into a baccalaureate,” Garcia said in an interview. “WGU is a lot more flexible in that regard.”

Garcia added that he is not worried students will skip the community colleges altogether and opt for all four years at WGU-Texas because “they’re considerably more expensive than we are.”

But Mary Aldridge Dean, executive director of the Texas Faculty Association, said prospective students — especially younger ones — should consider more than just the price tag when considering enrolling at WGU-Texas.

Continued in article

Question
Why can't the highest scoring CPA Exam taker in the nation probably can't become a licensed CPA in Texas?

Answer
Because in Texas, unlike the other 49 states, nobody can become a CPA without having taken at least five accounting courses onsite. Distance education graduates need not apply for a CPA certificate if they have distance education degrees and/or did not take about half of the required accounting, auditing, and tax courses onsite instead of online.

In effect this means that Texas does not allow full distance education accounting degrees such that even flagship universities like Texas and Texas A&M like flagship universities in Connecticut, Wisconsin, and Maryland have distance education accounting degrees.

March 31, 2011 message from Barbara Scofield

In the state of Texas educators are struggling with ever more onerous rules for candidacy. The AICPA, however, seems to be ignoring issues that loom large for the TSBPA. One of their newly featured "new CPAs" at the link below is an award winner from Colorado (not a 150 hour state) who took her accounting courses online (Texas requires 15 credit hours face to face of upper division accounting courses) from DeVry.

http://www.thiswaytocpa.com/exam-licensure/exam-diary/leslie-rezgui/

Could this person work as a CPA in Texas?

Barbara W. Scofield, PhD, CPA
Chair of Graduate Business Studies
Professor of Accounting
The University of Texas of the Permian Basin
4901 E. University Dr. Odessa, TX 79762
432-552-2183 (Office)

November 5,. 2010 reply from Bruce Lubich <BLubich@umuc.edu>
Note that Bruce is the Director of an online accounting distance education program in the University of Maryland System

Hi Bob,  

When TX first went to the 15 credit requirement, we had a couple of  University of Maryland University College students apply for the exam there,  and be rejected. Our transcript doesn't show which courses were taken  online. Apparently it's on the TX paperwork. Lying on that is not  something to be encouraged for future CPAs. So, unless a student has no  desire to sit for the CPA exam or they just need to fill in a few holes to  qualify, the TX market has dried up for all online programs.

Evidently, the  TX board takes this requirement very seriously, so my guess is that your  Deloitte hire would be denied the ability to sit. Seems to me Deloitte  would need to send the student to a different office until they pass the  exam.   As for reciprocity, I haven't heard of any problems. That doesn't mean  they're not out there, but I haven't heard of them.   Bottom line is TX has protected their investment in their brick & mortar  schools.   At one time LA and New Mexico had similar, though weaker rules like this.  I believe both have woken up and done away with those rules.  

Bruce Lubich 
University of Maryland University College

November 6, 2010 reply from Bob Jensen

Hi Bruce,

Thanks for this.
What you are saying is that the Texas Board may be cooperating with Texas Universities to reserve all entry-level accounting jobs in Texas for only graduates of Texas universities. Graduates from your program in the University of Maryland system can, thereby, not compete for jobs in Texas CPA firms. .

Out-of-state graduates need not apply. Seems like a great idea for the other 49 states so that graduates of a given state have a monopoly on jobs within the state. Of course the national and international CPA firms might object to complications this creates in hiring. And students who want to leave a state might object to not having jobs available anywhere other than the state where they graduated.

Why didn't the European Union think of this as a clever way of restricting labor flows between borders?

Bob Jensen

My threads (rough draft notes) on this antiquated and absurd ruling by the TSBPA (read that Big Brother) can be found at
http://www.cs.trinity.edu/~rjensen/temp/TexasBigBrother.htm


What I like about Gina's site is that it does not avoid programs in major colleges and universities.

August 8, 2011 message from Gina

Hi Bob Jensen,
I maintain
http://www.lawenforcementtraining.org. I have spent many
years as a law enforcement officer, and love my field of work. I decided to
make a website to help up and coming law enforcement students explore
schools that offer this degree degree. Do you mind taking a look and adding
it to your resource page of :
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/fraud.htm ?

http://www.lawenforcementtraining.org has become a fun passion
project of mine, and I think it serves as a great resource for anyone looking
to get a degree and start a career in law enforcement.  I would greatly
appreciate any feedback, and hope you will find it as a useful addition to your
site.

Thanks for taking a look!
Gina

Bob Jensen's threads on careers ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Bookbob1.htm#careers

Bob Jensen's threads on online training and education alternatives ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Crossborder.htm


"Crooked CFO: KPMG knows nothing about the character traits of criminals,” by Calib Newquist, Going Concern, August 19, 2011 ---
http://goingconcern.com/2011/08/crooked-cfo-kpmg-knows-nothing-about-the-character-traits-of-criminals/

Earlier this week we shared with you the latest analysis from KPMG that listed “key fraudster traits” and some of them seemed to describe a lot of the people you have worked or are currently working for. Things like “volatile,” “unreliability,” “unhappy,” and “self-interested” describes everyone I’ve ever been in around in the corporate world to one extent or another.

Since I was skeptical of this list, I asked Sam Antar what he thought of it. If you’ve been reading us for awhile, you’re familiar with Sam. If you’re new, I’ll do a quick refresher. Sam was the CFO of Crazy Eddie’s and was one of the masterminds behind one of the biggest financial frauds of the 1980s. While you (and I) were eating cereal in front of the TV on Saturday morning, Sam and his cousin Eddie were selling electronics and home appliances to our parents for rock bottom prices, while ripping off the government and investors for untold millions of dollars. In other words, the guy is a crook and knew/knows lots of crooks and knows their hopes (read: money), their dreams (read: money) all that crap (read: more money) and what they’ll do to get them. With that, Sam told me what he thought of KPMG’s analysis:

Continued in article

"Guest Post: Fraud Girl – Can We Detect Lying From Nonverbal Cues?" Simoleon Sense, June 20, 2010 ---
 http://www.simoleonsense.com/guest-post-fraud-girl-can-we-detect-lying-from-nonverbal-cues/
 This includes a video of Jeff Skilling's testimony:  Can you detect his lies?

"Spotting a hoax using statistics," Understanding Uncertainty, August 3, 2011 --- Click Here
http://understandinguncertainty.org/spotting-hoax-using-statistics?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+UnderstandingUncertainty+%28Understanding+Uncertainty%29

Bob Jensen's threads on fraud are at
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Fraud.htm


How to Lie With Statistics
"On Economy, Raw Data Gets a Grain of Salt," by Binyamin Appelbaum, The New York Times, August 16. 2011 ---
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/17/business/economy/raw-data-on-economic-growth-paints-fuzzy-picture.html?_r=2&pagewanted=all

“People want the best information that we have right now. But people need to understand that the best information that we have right now isn’t necessarily very informative,” said Tara M. Sinclair, an assistant professor of economics and international affairs at George Washington University. “It’s just the best information that we have.”

¶ The growth rate that the government announces roughly one month after the end of each quarter — news much anticipated in Washington and on Wall Street — has been off the mark over the period from 1983 to 2009 by an average of 1.3 percentage points, compared with more fully analyzed figures released years later, according to federal data.

Continued in article

Jensen Comment
There is great pressure on audit firms and clients to produce financial statement numbers more quickly since the typical annual financial statements are so delayed. But increasing the frequency of audited financial statement numbers is very costly and perhaps will suffer from the same reporting problems as are faced with monthly economic growth numbers versus long-delayed corrections of those numbers.


Methodology to Identify Small Businesses and Their Owners
Department of the U.S. Treasury
Technical Paper 4
August 2011 --- Click Here
http://www.treasury.gov/resource-center/tax-policy/tax-analysis/Documents/OTA-T2011-04-Small-Business-Methodology-Aug-8-2011.pdf

Comments from Paul Caron on August 9, 2011 ---
http://taxprof.typepad.com/

The Treasury Department's Office of Tax Analysis has released Methodology to Identify Small Businesses and Their Owners:

Due to data constraints and the lack of clear definitions, prior analyses of the tax code’s impact on small business owners were flawed. In this paper, we develop a methodology to define and identify small businesses. We then apply that methodology to a new data source to identify the individual owners of those small businesses. Having matched owners to their small business entities, we present tabulations that detail various tax characteristics of small businesses and their owners for tax year 2007. ...

For tax year 2007, our previous methodology counted 34.7 million filers reporting $662 billion of net flow-through business income as small business owners. Using our revised methodology, we count 20.0 million filers reporting $376 billion of net business income as small business owners under a broad measure of small business owner. Under our narrow definition, we count 9.4 million filers reporting $335 billion of net business income as small business owners.


If colleges want to make it more difficult to earn an A, they need to consider why faculty members feel pressure to award them.
Peter Eubanks

"Why We Inflate Grades," by Peter Eubanks, Inside Higher Ed, August 9, 2011 ---
http://www.insidehighered.com/views/2011/08/09/essay_on_why_faculty_members_participate_in_grade_inflation

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill made headlines recently by announcing a plan to fight grade inflation: all grades received will be contextualized on student transcripts, allowing graduate schools and potential employers to see grade distributions for each course and thus to determine just how much value to attach to those ever-prevalent As and Bs. This move is the latest in a series of attacks on what is perceived by many (rightly) to be an epidemic in higher education today, particularly among those institutions that seem to do well in the national rankings.

Student anxiety about such policies is understandable. Graduating seniors are naturally concerned about their competitiveness during difficult economic times, while juniors and seniors worry that they may be passed up for fellowships, summer programs, or other academic opportunities on account of a lowered grade-point average.

Professors, too, have their concerns about grade deflation; we not only care about our students’ successes but also about the implications of anti-inflation policies on our own careers. While institutions are increasingly taking measures to combat grade inflation, there are several key pressures faculty members face when assigning grades, and these may cause us to feel uneasy or hesitant about immediately subscribing to a strict regimen of grade deflation. These pressures in no way excuse or minimize the ethical implications of grade inflation, nor do I seek to undermine the efforts of those striving to curtail what is indeed a significant and widespread problem in higher education today. My purpose is only to suggest some of the underlying causes of this epidemic from a faculty perspective; to point out some of the pressures faculty face as they assign their students grades. These pressures, as I see it, come from three primary sources:

Pressure from students: Most professors are experienced in the familiar end-of-semester scene in which a student comes to office hours to argue for a higher grade. Such discussions often involve a student’s disputation of minutiae from past exams, papers, and assignments, all in the hope of gaining a point or two here and there and thus retroactively improving his or her grade. Such discussions can be quite time-consuming, and they often come at the busiest time of the semester, thus bringing with them the temptation to do whatever it takes to close the matter and move along. There may also be a nagging fear that minor grading errors have indeed been made and that the student should be given the benefit of the doubt. With ever-increasing college costs and the inevitable sense of student entitlement and consumerism that follow, such discussions are becoming all too common. and are not always limited to the end of the semester. Even more important, many faculty members dread and even fear the negative classroom atmosphere that often results from giving students "bad" grades (i.e.. C or below, though even a B fits this category for many), particularly in courses dependent on student discussion and participation, such as a seminar or a foreign language class.

Pressure from administrators: Success with student evaluations is a career necessity, whether one is a young scholar seeking the elusive Elysium of tenure or one belongs to that now-majority of faculty members who teach part-time or on an adjunct basis and are dependent on positive student evaluations for reappointment. At teaching-intensive colleges and universities, in particular, student evaluations are often of paramount importance, and faculty members must do what they can to keep their customers happy. Many faculty members feel, and numerous studies seem to suggest, that generous grade distributions correspond to positive teaching evaluations, so many faculty members, under pressure from administrators to produce good evaluations, feel a temptation to inflate grades to secure their own livelihoods. Since administrators usually have neither the time nor the expertise to make independent evaluations of a professor’s teaching ability (imagine a dean with both the leisure and the proficiency to sit in on and evaluate in the same semester both a Russian literature course and an advanced macroeconomics course, without having done any of the previous coursework...) they must rely heavily on student descriptions of what goes on in the classroom, descriptions that are often contradictory and that unfortunately do not always cohere.

Pressure from colleagues: Some faculty who wish to curb grade inflation may feel that they are the only ones fighting the problem. If everyone else is giving out inflated grades, why should they be the ones to stand alone, only to incur the displeasure of students who may be confused by inconsistent standards? As college freshmen arrive on campus increasingly unprepared for college work, faculty members, inheriting a problem passed on to them by their colleagues in secondary education, often have the difficult task of trying to determine reasonable standards of achievement. It takes effort and planning for faculty to balance their professional responsibilities to both their respective disciplines and to their students’ positive academic experience. In an era where budget cuts affect most severely those departments and programs with low enrollments, no one wants to lose the bidding war for students, and many professors, particularly those in vulnerable fields, fear that a "strict constructionist" approach to grade deflation may cost them student interest and consequently much-needed institutional support, both of which risk being redistributed to more favored colleagues. Furthermore, the seemingly ubiquitous nature of grade inflation may simplify the ethical quandaries involved: if everyone understands that grades are being unfairly inflated, then there may, in fact, be no unfairness involved at all, since the very transparency of grade inflation thus removes any sense of deception that may linger in our minds.

There is a final pressure to grade inflate, and it comes from ourselves. It may be the disquieting feeling that our own efforts in the classroom have sometimes been inadequate, that poor student performance reflects poor preparation or teaching on our part, and that grades must be inflated to compensate for our failings. It may come from the difficulties inherent in assigning grades to elusive and ultimately unquantifiable phenomena such as class participation, essays, student presentations, and the like. In such cases, grade inflation ceases to function as a lazy or disinterested tool for maintaining steady waters; it becomes, instead, a corrective measure seeking to make restitution for our own perceived shortcomings.

Continued in article

Bob Jensen's threads on the utter disgrace of grade inflation ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/HigherEdControversies.htm#GradeInflation


Competency-Based Grading
"Professors Cede Grading Power to Outsiders—Even Computers:  One college gives the job to software, while another employs independent 'evaluators," by Jeffrey R. Young, Chronicle of Higher Education, August 7, 2011 ---
http://chronicle.com/article/To-Justify-Every-A-Some/128528/?sid=wb&utm_source=wb&utm_medium=en

The best way to eliminate grade inflation is to take professors out of the grading process: Replace them with professional evaluators who never meet the students, and who don't worry that students will punish harsh grades with poor reviews. That's the argument made by leaders of Western Governors University, which has hired 300 adjunct professors who do nothing but grade student work.

"They think like assessors, not professors," says Diane Johnson, who is in charge of the university's cadre of graders. "The evaluators have no contact with the students at all. They don't know them. They don't know what color they are, what they look like, or where they live. Because of that, there is no temptation to skew results in any way other than to judge the students' work."

Western Governors is not the only institution reassessing grading. A few others, including the University of Central Florida, now outsource the scoring of some essay tests to computers. Their software can grade essays thanks to improvements in artificial-intelligence techniques. Software has no emotional biases, either, and one Florida instructor says machines have proved more fair and balanced in grading than humans have.

These efforts raise the question: What if professors aren't that good at grading? What if the model of giving instructors full control over grades is fundamentally flawed? As more observers call for evidence of college value in an era of ever-rising tuition costs, game-changing models like these are getting serious consideration.

Professors do score poorly when it comes to fair grading, according to a study published in July in the journal Teachers College Record. After crunching the numbers on decades' worth of grade reports from about 135 colleges, the researchers found that average grades have risen for 30 years, and that A is now the most common grade given at most colleges. The authors, Stuart Rojstaczer and Christopher Healy, argue that a "consumer-based approach" to higher education has created subtle incentives for professors to give higher marks than deserved. "The standard practice of allowing professors free rein in grading has resulted in grades that bear little relation to actual performance," the two professors concluded.

Naturally, the standard grading model has plenty of defenders, including some who argue that claims of grade inflation are exaggerated—students could, after all, really be earning those higher grades. The current system forges a nurturing relationship between instructor and student and gives individualized attention that no robot or stranger could give, this argument goes.

But the efforts at Western Governors and Central Florida could change that relationship, and point to ways to pop any grade-inflation bubble.

An Army of Graders

To understand Western Governors' approach, it's worth a reminder that the entire institution is an experiment that turns the typical university structure on its head. Western Governors is entirely online, for one thing. Technically it doesn't offer courses; instead it provides mentors who help students prepare for a series of high-stakes homework assignments. Those assignments are designed by a team of professional test-makers to prove competence in various subject areas.

The idea is that as long as students can leap all of those hurdles, they deserve degrees, whether or not they've ever entered a classroom, watched a lecture video, or participated in any other traditional teaching experience. The model is called "competency-based education."

Continued

Bob Jensen's threads on competency-based grading ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Assess.htm#ECA


"Success Comes From Better Data, Not Better Analysis," by Daryl Morey, Harvard Business Review Blog, August 8, 2011 --- Click Here
http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2011/08/success_comes_from_better_data.html?referral=00563&cm_mmc=email-_-newsletter-_-daily_alert-_-alert_date&utm_source=newsletter_daily_alert&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=alert_date

Jensen Comment
I think accountics researchers often use purchased databases (e.g., Compustat, AuditAnalytics, and CRSP) without questioning the possibility of data errors and limitation. For example, we recently took a look at the accounting litigation database of AuditAnalytics and found many serious omissions.

These databases are used by multiple accountics researchers, thereby compounding the felony,.

Bob Jensen's threads on what went wrong with accountics research are at
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/theory01.htm#WhatWentWrong


"New Process Could Make Canadian Oil Cheaper, Cleaner:  A method for getting oil out of tarry sands could reduce the costs and lower the greenhouse-gas emissions associated with its extraction," by Kevin Bullis, MIT's Technology Review, August 3, 2011 ---
http://www.technologyreview.com/energy/38204/?nlid=nldly&nld=2011-08-03


"College-Made Device Helps Visually Impaired Students See and Take Notes," by Rachel Wiseman, Chronicle of Higher Education, August 1, 2011 --- Click Here
http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/college-made-device-helps-visually-impaired-students-see-and-take-notes/32527?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

College students with very poor vision have had to struggle to see a blackboard and take notes—basic tasks that can hold some back. Now a team of four students from Arizona State University has designed a system, called Note-Taker, that couples a tablet PC and a video camera, and could be a major advance over the small eyeglass-mounted telescopes that many students have had to rely on. It recently won second place in Microsoft’s Imagine Cup technology competition.

There are roughly 75,000 students at colleges and trade schools who are visually impaired. The telescopes allow students with low vision to see the blackboard, but they can only focus on one section at a time. Then they have to take off the telescope, write notes, and then go back to the board and try and catch up with the lecture.

David S. Hayden, who graduated from Arizona State in May, understands these challenges—he can only read texts if he gets about two inches away from the material. Mr. Hayden, the lead designer of Note-Taker, says he faced a “morbid tradeoff” in class. Using the assistive technology that was available to him, he could either take notes or listen and absorb the information, but never both. After he had to withdraw from three senior-level math classes, he says, “I realized the existing technologies weren’t going to assist my needs, so I had a project on my hands.”

The result was Note-Taker, which connects a tablet PC (a laptop with a screen you can write on) to a high-resolution video camera. Screen commands get the camera to pan and zoom. The video footage, along with audio, can be played in real time on the tablet and are also saved for later reference. Alongside the video is a space for typed or handwritten notes, which students can jot down using a stylus. That should be helpful in math and science courses, says Mr. Hayden, where students need to copy down graphs, charts, and symbols not readily available on a keyboard.

Continued in article

Bob Jensen's threads on learning helpers for disabled persons ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/thetools.htm#Handicapped


 Required:  Go Easy of Students at LSU
"AAUP Faults Louisiana State for Its Treatment of 2 Scholars," by Peter Schmidt, Chronicle of Higher Education, August 1, 2011 ---
http://chronicle.com/article/AAUP-Faults-Louisiana-State/128442/?sid=wb&utm_source=wb&utm_medium=en


August 5, 2011 message from Richard Campbell About the Disastrous Version 9.1 of Blackboard

I am amazed at the significant retrogression from prior versions. Tasks that were previously very simple to do, are now very difficult. Even the Help utility is bizarre - in doing a key word search, you get solutions for multiple prior versions.

Instead of suing and buying their competition, they should have more closely kept their eyes on the home turf.

Bob Jensen's threads on Blackboard are at
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Blackboard.htm


Question
How do GMAT scores in your MBA program stack up against the competition from the most prestigious MBA Programs?

"GMAT::  How Low is Too Low for Top B-Schools?" by: Louis Lavelle, Business Week, August 3, 2011 ---
http://www.businessweek.com/bschools/blogs/mba_admissions/archives/2011/08/gmat_how_low_is_too_low_for_top_b-schools.html

Below is a list of publicly available information (or information obtained by Bloomberg Businessweek) on the most recent lowest score or lowest range of scores for our top ten schools. All information is for the Class of 2012. Where available, we’ve provided links to current class profiles.
 

1. Booth School of Business
Median score: 720
Lowest 10 percent: 660 or below
Source: Booth spokesperson

2. Harvard Business School
Median score: 730
Lowest score: 550
Class Profile

3. Wharton School
Median score: 720
Lowest 10 percent: 540
Class Profile

4. Kellogg School of Management
Median score: 720
Lowest 10 percent: 670 or below
Source: Bloomberg Businessweek survey

5. Stanford Graduate School of Business
Median score: 730
Lowest score: 580
Source: Stanford GSB spokesperson

6. Fuqua School of Business
Median Score: 700
Lowest 10 percent: 640 or below
Class Profile

7. Ross School of Business
Average score: 704
Lowest 10 percent: 650 or below
Class Profile

8. Haas School of Business
Average score: 718
Lowest 10 percent: 680 or below
Class Profile

9. Columbia Business School
Median score: NA
Lowest 10 percent: 680 or below
Class Profile

10. Sloan School of Management
Average score: 717
Lowest 10 percent: 680 or below
Class Profile

 

 


From the Scout Report on July 29, 2011

Cammster --- http://cammster.com/ 

Home security monitoring devices can be pricey, so it's nice to learn about a low-cost alternative. The Cammster program operates a type of motion detector, and users can set up their web camera to keep tabs on a certain area of their residence while they are away. Visitors just need to install the Cammster program and they will be sent "alert" emails at no cost if the program detects any motion. Also, the program has customized settings for those users who might have pets. This version of Cammster works with operating systems running Windows 2000 and newer or Mac OSX 10.3.1 and newer.


ClustrMaps --- http://www.clustrmaps.com/ 

Who visits your website? And perhaps more importantly, where are they from? ClustrMaps can provide answers to such questions, and users might even be entertained along the way. Visitors can use the link here to create a counter on their website that will list where visitors are located (using their IP address), along with showing an interactive world map of their respective locations. It's quite useful, and it is completely free for those users who receive fewer than 2500 visitors daily. This version is compatible with all operating systems.


States look to collect taxes from online retailers Amazon tax battle: However we vote, Amazon loses
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-cap-amazon-tax-20110725,0,114958.column 

Sales-tax issues make Indiana attractive to Amazon, but at what cost?
http://www.indystar.com/article/20110724/BUSINESS04/307240001/Sales-tax-issues-make-Indiana-attractive-Amazon-what-cost-  

Amazon.com makes a taxing argument http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/jontalton/2015689390_biztaltoncol24.html 

Wal-Mart vs. Amazon in California tax law battle: Booksellers in the crossfire
http://www.zdnet.com/blog/violetblue/wal-mart-vs-amazon-in-california-tax-law-battle-booksellers-in-the-crossfire/552 

Book lovers mourn Borders closure http://www.dailymail.com/News/Kanawha/201107241299 

Amazon.com Help: Sales Tax http://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=468512

 


From the Scout Report on August 5, 2011

Aardvark --- http://vark.com/ 

Recently purchased by Google, the Aardvark site is a great way to get quick answers to questions large and small. Visitors can type in their question into the text box on the Aardvark site, and the site will find just the right person to answer the question. Users are encouraged to send questions via Twitter or email as well, and it will generally take just a few minutes to get an answer. Essentially, Aardvark sends out these questions to people in a users' network who are available via IM or email in order to find a suitable response. The site also includes sample questions and contact information. This version is compatible with all operating systems.


DuckDuckGo --- http://duckduckgo.com/ 

You may have played "duck duck goose" growing up, but have you used "DuckDuckGo" yet? It's a new search engine that is geared towards those folks browsing the web who are looking for a general, all-purpose way to search for materials online. DuckDuckGo doesn't track users like some search engines, and there's even a "Goodies" section. In this section, users can personalize their search homepage, learn about their syntax commands, and also find out information about their keyboard shortcuts. This version is compatible with all operating systems.


After an official declaration of famine in Somalia, supplies begin toarrive
The Horn of Africa: Chronicle of a famine foretold
http://www.economist.com/node/21524864

Somali-Americans Join Fight Against Drought
http://www.voanews.com/english/news/africa/Somali-Americans-Join-Fight-
Against-Drought-in-the-Horn-of-Africa-126392493.html


With famine in Somalia, a case of leadership (not compassion) fatigue
http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/on-leadership/with-famine-in-somalia-
a-case-of-leadership-not-compassion-fatigue/2011/08/03/gIQAulkerI_story.html


Video: Africa famine: Thousands of Somalis continue to flood to Kenyan
refugee camps
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/kenya/8678815/Africa-
famine-thousands-of-Somalis-continue-to-flock-to-Kenyan-refugee-camp.html


United Nations World Food Programme: Somalia
http://www.wfp.org/countries/somalia

BBC News: Somalia country profile
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/country_profiles/1072592.stm


Free online textbooks, cases, and tutorials in accounting, finance, economics, and statistics --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/ElectronicLiterature.htm#Textbooks


Education Tutorials

Teacher Institute: Exploratorium [iTunes] --- http://www.exploratorium.edu/teacher_institute/

Center for Research and Learning: Multicultural Teaching Strategies --- http://www.crlt.umich.edu/tstrategies/tsmdt.php

The Higher Education Academy: Case studies: Bioscience learning and teaching --- http://www.bioscience.heacademy.ac.uk/resources/cslandt.aspx

National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science --- http://sciencecases.lib.buffalo.edu/cs/

The Center for Digital Initiatives: Arkansas State University (cross-discipline teaching) --- http://www.astate.edu/cdi/

Bob Jensen's threads on general education tutorials are at http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Bookbob2.htm#EducationResearch


Engineering, Science, and Medicine Tutorials

125 Great Science Videos: From Astronomy to Physics & Psychology ---
http://www.openculture.com/science_videos

Society for Neuroscience: Neuroscience Education Resources Virtual Encycloportal [pdf, Flash Player]
http://www.ndgo.net/sfn/nerve/

Neuroscience for Kids (Science, Medicine, Children) ---  http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/neurok.html 
Other resources for neuroscience can be found at http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/ehc.html 

Neuroscience Information Framework --- http://neuinfo.org/

Exploring Life's Origins: A Virtual Exhibition --- http://exploringorigins.org

Video
Astonish Me: A Magical Mystery Through Nature’s Hidden Secrets --- Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/08/astonish_me_the_mysteries_nature_holds.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

BioEd Online: Spider in Space Mission Page --- http://www.bioedonline.org/space/STS_Mission_134S.cfm

Video
The Moon Up Close in High Definition --- Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/08/the_moon_up_close_in_hd.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

Related Content:

Touring the Earth from Space (in HD)

The Best of NASA Space Shuttle Videos (1981-2010)

 

The Higher Education Academy: Case studies: Bioscience learning and teaching --- http://www.bioscience.heacademy.ac.uk/resources/cslandt.aspx

National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science --- http://sciencecases.lib.buffalo.edu/cs/

STEM - Minnesota State Colleges and Universities --- http://www.stem.project.mnscu.edu/

MESSENGER (NASA investigation of the planet Mercury) ---  http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/index.php

Going Supernova | Amazing Space Photos --- http://xfinity.comcast.net/slideshow/news-spacepictures/39/#

American Association of Physicists in Medicine Medical Physics Resource Page --- http://www.aapm.org/links/medphys/

The Animal Communication Project --- https://mail.google.com/mail/?shva=1#inbox/1317670940060d22

Natural History Museum - Other Invertebrates --- http://www.nhm.ac.uk/nature-online/life/other-invertebrates/index.html

Tufts University Center for Engineering Education and Outreach --- http://www.ceeo.tufts.edu/

Woods Institute for the Environment --- http://woods.stanford.edu/cgi-bin

August 8, 2011 message from biology professor Bob Blystone

I wish I had discovered this before the end of summer.  Baylor College of Medicine has an interesting education project known as BioEd Online.  One of their projects might interest middle school aged kids...  Spiders in Space.  A variety of activities and a possible science fair project, all done digitally.

http://www.bioedonline.org/space/STS_Mission_134S.cfm

Have a look before we are all back to school.

Bob Blystone

 

Bob Jensen's threads on free online science, engineering, and medicine tutorials are at --- http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Bookbob2.htm#Science


Social Science and Economics Tutorials

125 Great Science Videos: From Astronomy to Physics & Psychology ---
http://www.openculture.com/science_videos

Video Lectures in Finance from Yale
Financial Markets Course with Yale
Finance and Economics Professor Robert Shiller
Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/08/robert_shiller_course.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

Bob Jensen's threads on free video lectures and courses from prestigious universities
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI

National Security Archive: Eleven Possibilities for Pentagon Papers' 11 Words --- http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB350/

TED Video Featuring a Brilliant Physicist:  You Will Be Mesmerized
Geoffrey West: The surprising math of cities and corporations --- Click Here
http://www.ted.com/talks/geoffrey_west_the_surprising_math_of_cities_and_corporations.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TEDTalks_video+%28TEDTalks+%28video%29%29

"Stanford U. Offers Free Online Course in Artificial Intelligence," Jie Jenny Zou, Chronicle of Higher Education, August 2, 2011 ---
http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/stanford-u-offers-free-online-course-in-artificial-intelligence/32622

Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco: Center for Pacific Basin Studies --- http://www.frbsf.org/economics/pbc/

Educational Resources from the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco --- http://www.frbsf.org/education/

Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM) --- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CAPM

This is a Must Read
Dartmouth Professor Ken French comes in for the rescue of CAPM!
"How to use the Fama French Model," Empirical Finance Blog, August 1, 2011 ---
http://blog.empiricalfinancellc.com/2011/08/how-to-use-the-fama-french-model/

The CAPM is prolific, but doesn’t appear to work!

For example, in the figures below I’ve plotted the Fama-French 25 (portfolios ranked on size and book-to-market) against beta.

In the first figure, I plot the average excess return to the FF 25 against the average excess return one would expect, given beta.

If you’d like to see how I calculated the charts above, please reference the excel file here.

Given such a poor track record, is anyone still using the CAPM?

Lot’s of people, apparently…

Welch (2008) finds that ~75% of professors recommend the use of the model when estimating the cost of capital, and Graham and Harvey (2001) find that ~74% of CFOs use the CAPM in their work.

A few quotes from Graham and Harvey 2001 sum up common sentiment regarding the CAPM:

“While the CAPM is popular, we show later that it is not clear that the model is applied properly in practice. Of course, even if it is applied properly, it is not clear that the CAPM is a very good model [see Fama and French (1992)].

“…practitioners might not apply the CAPM or NPV rule correctly. It is also interesting that CFOs pay very little attentionto risk factors based on momentum and book-to-market-value.”

Of course, there are lots of arguments to consider before throwing out the CAPM. Here are a few:

Regardless, being that this blog is dedicated to empirical data and evidence, and not about ‘mentally masturbating about theoretical finance models,’ we’ll operate under the assumption that the CAPM is dead until new data comes available.

The Fama French Alternative?

Given the CAPM doesn’t work that well in practice, perhaps we should look into the Fama French model (which isn’t perfect or cutting edge, but a solid workhorse nonetheless). And while the FF model inputs are highly controversial, one thing is clear: the FF 3-factor model does a great job explaining the variability of returns. For example, according to Fama French 1993, the 3-factor model explains over 90% of the variability in returns, whereas the CAPM can only explain ~70%!

The 3-factor model is great, but how the heck does one estimate the FF factors?

Dartmouth Professor Ken French comes in for the rescue!

Continued in article

Bob Jensen's criticisms of accounting studies based on misuse of the CAPM
Slow Loading ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/theory01.htm#AccentuateTheObvious

The Demise of Guys
Questions
Why do guys prefer male bonding over female mating?
Why are guys 30% more likely to drop out of college?
Why do guys underperform relative to women at all levels of schooling?
Why are males 2/3 more likely to need special education?
Why are men much more likely to become addicted to drugs and porn?
Why do accounting firms hire more women than men?

Phil Zimbardo is one of the most successful psychology professors in the world and one of this discipline's most well-known authors ---
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phil_zimbardo

TED Video
"The Demise of Guys," by Phil Zimbardo, TED --- Click Here
http://www.ted.com/talks/zimchallenge.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TEDTalks_video+%28TEDTalks+%28video%29%29

Association of Farmworker Opportunity Programs --- http://afop.org/

Bob Jensen's threads on open sharing courses, course materials, and videos ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/updateee.htm#OKI 

 

Bob Jensen's threads on Economics, Anthropology, Social Sciences, and Philosophy tutorials are at http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Bookbob2.htm#Social


Law and Legal Studies

Plat Books of Missouri --- http://digital.library.umsystem.edu/cgi/i/image/image-idx?c=platic

Fair Use Section 107 of the DMCA --- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fair_Use
Note that many nations such as Canada do not have Fair Use safe harbors for educators

"Last Round of Filings Made in Georgia State U. Fair-Use Lawsuit," Chronicle of Higher Education, August 4, 2011 ---
http://chronicle.com/blogs/ticker/last-round-of-filings-made-in-georgia-state-u-fair-use-lawsuit/35088?sid=wc&utm_source=wc&utm_medium=en

The plaintiffs and the defendants in the fair-use lawsuit that has pitted three academic publishers against Georgia State University have now filed their final post-trial briefs. That was the last opportunity for each side to make its case before the federal judge overseeing the case in Atlanta delivers a ruling. No date has been set for a decision in the closely watched case, but observers say one is likely by early fall. Cambridge U. Press, Oxford U. Press, and SAGE Publications have alleged that the use of copyrighted material in e-reserves and on faculty Web sites has exceeded the bounds of fair use. (See here for different opinions on what’s at stake for higher education.)

Bob Jensen's threads on Section 107 of the dreaded DMCA ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/000aaa/theworry.htm#Copyright

Bob Jensen's threads on law and legal studies are at http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Bookbob2.htm#Law


Math Tutorials

"Spotting a hoax using statistics," Understanding Uncertainty, August 3, 2011 --- Click Here
http://understandinguncertainty.org/spotting-hoax-using-statistics?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+UnderstandingUncertainty+%28Understanding+Uncertainty%29

The Math Guy Radio Archive
Keith Devlin, a Stanford math professor's 78 Tutorials on NPR --- Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/08/the_math_guy_radio_archive.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29 

Bob Jensen's threads on free online mathematics tutorials are at http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Bookbob2.htm#050421Mathematics


History Tutorials

Video:  Richard Dawkins’ Uncut Interviews with Peter Singer & Big Thinkers --- Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/07/richard_dawkins_uncut_interviews_with_peter_singer_big_thinkers.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

Bob Jensen's threads on history tutorials are at http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Bookbob2.htm#History
Also see http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/ElectronicLiterature.htm  

Pakistan during border disputes with India in 1935
Video: Wings over Waziristan http://airminded.org/2010/04/20/wings-over-waziristan/

25Great Culture Links --- Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/08/open_culture_beat_no_8_.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

Vladimir Nabokov & Lionel Trilling on Lolita: Another Great Love Story? --- Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/08/vladimir_nabokov_lionel_trilling_on_lolita.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

Shelburne Museum (paintings, American History) --- http://shelburnemuseum.org/

Name That Painting! --- Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/07/name_that_painting.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

The Louisville Herald-Post Collection --- http://digital.library.louisville.edu/collections/heraldpost/

Colorado State University: Great Western Sugar Digital Collection --- http://lib.colostate.edu/archives/greatwestern/

National Security Archive: Eleven Possibilities for Pentagon Papers' 11 Words --- http://www.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB350/

The Food Museum --- http://www.foodmuseum.com/

Colorado State University: Great Western Sugar Digital Collection (note Film Collection)---
http://lib.colostate.edu/archives/greatwestern/

Video:  VJ Day, Honolulu Hawaii, August 14, 1945 --- http://vimeo.com/5645171

50 Famous Scientists & Academics Speak About God: Part II --- Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/08/50_famous_scientists_academics_speak_about_god_part_ii.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

Hiroshima After the Atomic Bomb in 360 Degrees --- Click Here
http://www.openculture.com/2011/08/hiroshima_after_the_atomic_bomb_in_360.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+OpenCulture+%28Open+Culture%29

Nevada Division of State Parks --- http://parks.nv.gov/

Online Nevada Encyclopedia --- http://www.onlinenevada.org/

From Auburn University
Eugene B. Sledge Collection (Historical Photographs) --- http://diglib.auburn.edu/collections/ebsledge/

Plat Books of Missouri
http://digital.library.umsystem.edu/cgi/i/image/image-idx?c=platic;

University of Idaho Historical Photograph Collection --- http://contentdm.lib.uidaho.edu/cdm4/browse.php?CISOROOT=/spec_uihp

Forwarded by Paula

JUST CLICK ON A DATE AND SIT BACK AND ENJOY

 
1. JACKIE GLEASON ON THE ROCKY MARCIANO SHOW THE MAIN EVENT (1960) 
2.  JAMES DEAN: HIS FINAL TV APPEARANCE 
(1954)  
3.  ELVIS SINGS BLUE SUEDE SHOES 
(1956)  
4.  A TRIBUTE TO ELVIS PRESLEY, THE KING OF ROCK & ROLL 
(1959-62)  
5.  THE EDSEL INTRODUCED ON NBC 
(1957)  
6.  BOBBY DARIN'S "MACK THE KNIFE" 
(1959)  
7.  WESTINGHOUSE DEBUTS HI-TECH "ADVANCED TV" 
(1951) 
8.  WILLIAM BENDIX AS LOVABLE CHESTER A. RILEY 
(1956)  
9.  ICONS I: WHAT MADE 50'S TV GOLDEN 
(COMPILATION, (1952-60)  
10.  THE PATTI PAGE SHOW 
(1958) 
11. BLOOPERS FROM THE HONEYMOONERS 
(1957-58) 
12.  THE CENSORED JERRY LEE LEWIS HERE UNCENSORED! 
(1957-59) 
13.  A TRUE 50's DOO WOP TV CLASSIC 
(1958) 
14.  FAMILY AFFAIR 
(1966) 
15.  ALAN FREED'S BIG BEAT DANCE PARTY DANCERS 
(1959) 
16.  THE STEVE ALLEN SHOW 
(1957) 
17.  The Inventor Of TV Sketch Comedy ERNIE KOVACS 
(1954) 
18.  THE RED SKELTON SHOW 
(1959) 
19.  ICONS: THE DELINQUENCY RAMPAGE! 
(COMPILATION, 1957-60) 
20.  FATHER KNOWS BEST 
(1953) 
21.  PETTICOAT JUNCTION 
(1962) 
22.  OLYMPIC GOLD MEDALIST BOB MATTHIAS 
(1956) 
23.  DANCES OF THE 1950's: THE HAND JIVE 
(1957) 
24.  GROUCHO MARX YOU BET YOUR LIFE 
(1959) 
25.  DRAGNET 
(1959) 
26.  THE IMMORTAL MUSICAL COMEDY OF VICTOR BORGE 
1951 
27.  EDDIE FISHER SINGS A MEDLEY OF HIS BIGGEST HITS 
1953 
28.  ABBOTT & COSTELLO: WHO'S ON FIRST? 
1951 
29.  MORE DANCES OF THE 1950's THE JITTERBUG 
1958 
30. THE HONEYMOONERS ... IN COLOR! 
1969 
31.  THE ORIGINAL FLASH GORDON SERIAL 
theatres-1939; TV-1960's 
32.  THE LONE RANGER 
1955 
33.  THE ENDEARING GRIMACES OF EDDIE CANTOR 
1952 
34.  BOBBY DARIN NERVOUSLY HOSTS A BEAUTY CONTEST 
1957 
35.  MORE DANCES OF THE 1950's: THE LINDY HOP 
1959 
36.  SHAKE, BABY, SHAKE!  IT'S THE KILLER AGAIN! 
1958 
37.  THE DANNY THOMAS SHOW 
1958 
38.  SID CAESAR: YOUR SHOW OF SHOWS 
1957 
39.  HERE COMES TOBOR! 
1954 
40.  THE ADVENTURES OF SUPERMAN 
1954 
41.  THE ADVENTURES OF FLIPPER 
1964 
42.  SPIKE JONES 
1951 
43.  CAPTAIN VIDEO & HIS VIDEO RANGERS 
1950 
44.  THE LIBERACE SHOW 
1952 
45.  MEDIC 
1954 
46.  THE BIG VALLEY 
1965 
47.  THE ROOTS OF TV BASEBALL 
1950-57 
48.  Mc HALE'S NAVY 
1962 
49.  HOPALONG CASSIDY 
1952 
50.  DARK SHADOWS 
1966 
51.  
FADS & FANCIES OF THE 50s & 60s 
52.  I LOVE LUCY 
1952 
53.  THE DICK VAN DYKE SHOW 
1962 
54.  THE BEATLES FIRST TELEVISION APPEARANCE 
1963 
55.  BAT MASTERSON 
1958 
56.  MARTY ROBBINS ON THE JOHNNY CASH SHOW 
1964 
57.  FRANK SINATRA SPEAKS CANDIDLY 
1954 
58.  PASSWORD 
1962 
59.  STAR TREK TV ON DEMAND 
1966-present 
60.  MORE DANCES OF THE 50's: THE SWINGBACK 
1958 
61.  THE LIVE TV FRIDGE COMMERCIAL CATASTROPHE 
1954 
62.  THE ARTHUR GODFREY SHOW 
1957 
63.   BUILDING THE 1958 DODGE 
1957 
64.  FIGHT CLASSIC: ROCKY MARCIANO vs. JERSEY JOE WALCOTT 
1952 
65.  AND MORE GREAT ICONS OF THE 50's VOL III 
1952-59 
66.  ALFRED HITCHCOCK PRESENTS 
1959 
67.  SATURDAY NIGHTLIVE~~ BEFORE SNL 
1954-58 
68.  FELIX THE CAT 
1959 
69.  THE DONNA REED SHOW 
1958 
70.  THE GOLDBERGS 
1952 
71.  LUCILLE BALL & CAROL BURNETT 
1965 
72.  THE LITTLE RASCALS 
1955 
73.  HIGHWAY PATROL 
1956 
74.  LOST IN SPACE 
1966 
75.  BEULAH 
1951 
76.  BEWITCHED 
1966 
77.  I DREAM OF JEANIE 
1966 
78.  SEA HUNT 
1957 
79.  DYNAMITE JOE RINDONE 
1954 
80.  THE MILTON BERLE SHOW 
1957 

 


Language Tutorials

Bob Jensen's links to language tutorials are at http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Bookbob2.htm#Languages


Music Tutorials

 

Bob Jensen's threads on free music tutorials are at
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Bookbob2.htm#050421Music

Bob Jensen's threads on music performances ---
http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/music.htm


Writing Tutorials

Bob Jensen's helpers for writers are at http://www.trinity.edu/rjensen/Bookbob3.htm#Dictionaries


Updates from WebMD --- http://www.webmd.com/

August 2, 2011

August 3, 2011

August 4, 2011

August 5, 2011

August 6, 2011