The Department of Biology engages and supports students in a dynamic learning environment that promotes a broad, integrated, and interdisciplinary understanding of biological systems. The introductory biology curriculum emphasizes the core concepts and competencies described by the National Science Foundation in Vision and Change, and upper-division courses provide an opportunity to develop greater depth in select areas. The department supports a variety of interdisciplinary programs and encourages joint student-faculty research projects.

Area A: The Core (BIOL)

BIOL-1111 Introductory Biology Lab
Description
This is an introductory course that provides an understanding of the scientific methods used to investigate biological questions and how the results of these studies are communicated. The semester is divided into investigative modules in which student groups learn a technique, conduct an experiment or study, and write their results in the form of a scientific paper. (Offered every Spring.) BIOL 1311 must be taken concurrently.
Credits
1 credit
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
Approaches to Creation and Analysis
BIOL-1311 Integrative Biology
Description
This course is designed to introduce students to the wide range of knowledge in the biological sciences and to the methods that have built this knowledge base. The course is organized around a series of topic-based modules, each of which will integrate modern biological approaches at the cellular, organismal, and population levels. Modules for this first semester course include global change, the evolution of sexual reproduction, or other contemporary topics. (Offered every Spring) Corequisite: BIOL 1111
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
Approaches to Creation and Analysis
BIOL-2112 Cells and Cell Systems Lab
Description
Laboratory experiences that support the Cells and Cell Systems course. Emphasis on development of laboratory abilities including the design, execution and analysis of a biological investigations. Students will also be expected to demonstrate competency in techniques such as liquid handling, microscopy, data acquisition, and data analysis. (Offered every Fall). Prerequisites: BIOL 1311/1111 and CHEM 1318 or 1300 Corequisites: BIOL 2312
Credits
1 credit
Level
Lower Division
BIOL-2312 Cells and Cell Systems
Description
This course addresses structure and function of cells using selected examples from biological systems to illustrate core biological concepts and motivate development of science competencies. Students will be expected to learn how cells regulate processes; how these processes relate to system function; how the physical world influences cell behavior; how to analyze and interpret experimental findings from both primary data and research literature; and how to predict cell and cell system behavior. (Offered every Fall.) Prerequisites: BIOL 1311/1111 and CHEM 1318 or 1300 Corequisites: BIOL 2112
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division

Area B: Courses (BIOL)

BIOL-3301 Experiential Learning in Ecology and Evolution
Description
This is a field-based, inquiry-driven course that emphasizes hypothesis-testing in the natural world. In close collaboration with biology faculty in an ecological field setting, students will design and conduct field experiments on a variety of topics in ecology and evolution. The objectives of the course are for students to gain hands-on experiences with organisms in the field; develop the skills, techniques, and methods of analysis required to conduct biological field studies; communicate the results of scientific studies; and gain an appreciation for natural history. This course will enhance students' ability in critical thinking in the context of their upper division courses in ecology and evolution. Class time will be used to learn important techniques and means of analysis for field studies. Students will be required to participate in two overnight field trips and one four-day field excursion in mid- to late-March. (Offered every Spring). Prerequisites: Biol 3413, Chem 1318, 1118, and one upper division biology course in the ecology and evolution area (3420 through 3435) or Microbiology (Biology 3458). A statistics course is highly recommended. This course may not be taken simultaneously with BIOL 4201.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
BIOL-3302 Experiential Learning in Cell and Molecular Biology
Description
The course focuses on modern laboratory techniques in cell and molecular biology. Research skills are developed through hypothesis generation, experimental design, implementation, data analysis, and scientific communication. Students will conduct guided-¬-inquiry projects utilizing technologies such as flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, gene expression analysis, and quantitative modeling. Students will be required to complete 3 hours/week in lab and 1 hour weekly in recitation. Students will be expected to maintain projects outside scheduled laboratory sections. (Offered every Spring). Prerequisites: one upper-¬-level Area B Biology course in the cell and molecular area (BIOL 3450-¬-3474). This course may not be taken simultaneously with BIOL 4201.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
BIOL-3413 Genes, Phenotypes, and Evolutionary Dynamics
Description
This course uses a single biological theme, for example human-viral interactions, to illustrate core biological concepts and motivate development of science competencies. Students are expected to learn how the structures of biological molecules relate to their functions; how biological information is stored and retrieved in diverse organisms; how mutation and selection have led to genetic changes and what molecular evidence supports evolution through time; how biological systems interact; and how to construct mathematical models that lead to testable predictions. Prerequisite: BIOL 2312/2112
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
BIOL-3420 Animal Behavior
Description
This course will investigate both evolutionary and proximate aspects of animal behavior. Using the logical framework of the four levels of analysis, we will cover: 1) the adaptive value of specific behaviors and the role of natural selection in maintaining behaviors; 2) how behaviors have evolved over time; 3) how behaviors develop within an individual; and 4)the neural, hormonal, and physiological mechanisms underlying behaviors. Lectures will cover a variety of topics, including: natural selection and evolution; genes and the environment; animal learning and cognition; hormones and their role in mediating behavior; neural mechanisms; foraging behavior; predator-prey interactions; sexual selection; animal communication; courtship and mate choice; and social behavior. In addition to lectures, we will develop skills to understand and interpret primary literature, which will be facilitated through group-discussions of journal articles. The laboratory will focus on developing skills of hypo-deductive inquiry, and on the design, implementation, and analysis of experiments that will be carried out in the laboratory and field. As part of the laboratory, students will develop a sophisticated and in-depth review of the literature focusing on a specific topic of animal behavior, culminating in a final paper and a presentation to the class. Prerequisite: BIOL 3413, CHEM 2319, 2119
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Interdisciplinary Clusters
BIOL-3426 Vertebrate Biology
Description
This course is an evolutionary survey of vertebrates that will focus on major evolutionary innovations and systematic relationships, and major features of the anatomy, physiology, life history, and behavior of vertebrate taxa. The laboratory includes studies of evolutionary adaptations, surveys of taxa, field trips, and identification of local vertebrates. Grades for the course will be determined from lecture exams, laboratory practicals, one comprehensive final exam, and a series of presentations in lecture and lab sessions. One weekend field trip is required. (Offered every other year.) Prerequisites: BIOL 3413, CHEM 2319, 2119.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
BIOL-3434 Ecology
Description
This course is designed to facilitate students' understanding of how biotic and abiotic factors determine abundance and distribution of organisms in natural communities and how scientists study these phenomena. Principal ecological theory serves as a framework for the course. This course is also designed to facilitate student learning of laboratory and field techniques to make observations; design experiments; and measure and analyze information about the biotic and abiotic world. Exams and assignments are designed to assess if students have learned how to 1) analyze information across levels of ecological organization and apply what they learn to new situations, 2) critically evaluate published research, 3) develop sound ecological questions and hypotheses, 4) design and implement experiments to test hypotheses, 5) analyze and interpret data, and 6) communicate findings in written and oral format to the class and in a manner that would translate to the scientific community. The course is constructed as a combination of interactive discussions and activities designed to reinforce student engagement with an electronic textbook and field-based laboratory. Students will be outside for most laboratory sessions and are required to attend a weekend field trip. (Offered every year). Prerequisites: Biol 3413, Chem 2319, 2119. Strongly recommended: PSYC 2401 or MATH 1320.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
BIOL-3435 Evolution
Description
This course will survey the history of evolutionary thought, the mechanisms and patterns of evolutionary change, and the methods scientists use to study evolution. Topics to be explored include evolution by natural and sexual selection, neutral drift, fitness and adaptation, modes of speciation, phylogenetics, extinction, and applications of evolution in modern medicine. The laboratory portion of the course will include methods to describe and measure diversity, to experimentally create diversity, and to use evolutionary statistics to address broad biological questions. Some experiments will require time outside of scheduled lab. (Offered every Year). Prerequisites: BIOL 3413, CHEM 2319, 2119. Strongly Recommended: MATH 1320 or PSYC 2401
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
BIOL-3440 Costa Rican Ecology
Description
Middle America, the region extending from central Mexico to Colombia, is one of the most biologically diverse regions of the world with a high degree of endemism (species found nowhere else). This diversity and endemism have resulted from a complex tectonic and climatic history that has promoted the evolution of different species. The objective of this course is to explore this diversity across different ecoregions of Costa Rica, focusing on the diversity and abundance of small to medium-sized mammals at elevations ranging from sea-level rainforests and dry forests to high-elevation cloud forests. The course will begin by studying rainforest ecology at the Osa Peninsula and then transitioning up the coast of Costa Rica to sea-level dry forests and the highlands of the Monteverde area to study the biodiversity on both the Pacific and Caribbean sides of the Tilaran mountains. While the focus will be surveying and sampling mammals, students will also study the flora, fauna, and cultural elements in these different regions. Additionally, we will explore the unique Costa Rican cultural character and some of the reasons for this uniqueness and engage in a service project in the Monteverde area. (Offered every other year). Prerequisites: BIOL 3413, CHEM 1318, 1118 .
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
BIOL-3450 Genetics
Description
An understanding of genetics is fundamental to most studies in biology because of the central role of heredity in life and evolution. This course will use a text and primary literature to study the following subjects and principles: Mendelian inheritance of qualitative and quantitative characters and probabilistic analysis of heredity; the molecular nature of genes, including the basic classes and functions of genes and regulation of transcription in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems; and the behavior of genes in populations, including mathematical treatments of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and the five evolutionary forces (mutation, migration, selection, drift, and non-random mating). The laboratory will use model systems to investigate these basic principles. Some experiments will require time outside of schedule lab hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 3413, CHEM 2319, 2119
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
BIOL-3457 Neurobiology
Description
Neurobiology focuses on the organization and function of nervous tissues and systems. The course begins with an anatomical overview, followed by an examination of neural system function at the level of signaling and synaptic transmission, sensory systems, and central system integration and control. With this foundation, the course explores brain development and plasticity. Additional hours are required to monitor experiments. (also listed as NEUR 3447.) (Offered every year). Additional Prerequisites: BIOL 3413, NEUR 2310, and CHEM 2319, 2119
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
BIOL-3458 Microbiology
Description
The study of microbial organisms is of tremendous importance in our world today. This course emphasizes the basic biology of bacteria, including their varied morphology, growth and nutritional requirements, cell motility, gene regulation, mechanisms of antibiotic resistance, and bacterial interactions as populations and with other organisms. Other topics covered include viruses and the Archaea. The impact of microbes on medicine, public health, agriculture and biotechnology are discussed. In addition to exams, a research paper on a recent topic from the primary research literature in microbiology is required. The laboratory covers diverse techniques on manipulation and growth of bacterial cultures, microscopy, testing of environmental samples, bacterial genetics and molecular biology, and identification of unknown organisms. Multiple experiments are run concurrently. Students are expected to visit the lab on days other than the assigned period to monitor experiments. (Offered every Spring) Prerequisites: BIOL 3413 and CHEM 2319, 2119.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
BIOL-3462 Animal Physiology
Description
This course is a study of the principles of homeostasis with emphasis on major vertebrate organ systems. This course begins with a detailed molecular investigation of excitable membrane physiology (nerve and muscle) followed by a systematic investigation of endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal and gastrointestinal physiology. Integrative problem sets are assigned to address the complex interactions between organ systems. Laboratory experience involves experimentation with sophisticated physiological equipment and computerized data acquisition systems to reinforce concepts presented in lecture. Lecture examinations, laboratory reports, homework problem sets, and a research paper with presentation will be used to assess student understanding in this course. Prerequisites: Biol 3413, Chem 2319, 2119.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
BIOL-3463 Developmental Biology
Description
Through integration of information from various biology subdisciplines, course topics include the following: vertebrate body plan pattering, genetic control of the Drosophila body plan, early morphogenesis, cell differentiation, organogenesis, gamete formation, and fertilization. The laboratory follows development using microscopy and through special projects involving several animal systems, including avian. Course assessment includes in-class examinations, oral presentations, and group projects. Additional laboratory hours are required to monitor experiments. Prerequisites: Biol 3413, Chem 2319, 2119.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
BIOL-3466 Cell Biology
Description
Cells form the basic working units of organs and the systems that organs comprise. This course is designed to build an understanding of the fundamental processes that govern the operations of cells. Cells face challenges of maintaining boundaries, communicating with neighboring cells, transporting essential components across barrier membranes, generating chemical energy, regulating cell phenotype, and maintaining cell structure. In order to function as part of a specialized tissue or organ, cells elaborate specific subsets of organelles to dedicate themselves to performing specific functions. The course will provide the background to understand the cellular mechanisms of specialized cells, and allow one to predict the underlying cellular physiology of most tissue systems. The laboratory takes an investigative approach, introducing microscopic, molecular, and biochemical tools for studying cells. Grades for the course are to be determined by in-class examinations and laboratory reports. Additional Prerequisite: BIOL 3413, CHEM 2319, 2119; at least one Area B course or CHEM 3330
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
BIOL-3474 Molecular Biology
Description
This course investigates the structure-function relationships of cellular machinery involved in gene expression and its roles in regulation across multiple levels of biological organization in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Topics include structure and properties of nucleic acids/genomes and amino acids/proteins, nucleic acid polymerases, ribosomes and the variety of regulatory mechanisms governing the expression of genetic information. The course emphasizes an examination of experimental evidence that shapes our understanding of molecular biological phenomena. Laboratory experiments and projects illustrate key concepts and principles. Prequisite: BIOL 3450, 3458, 3466, or CHEM 3330
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division

Area C: Technique and Research Concentration (BIOL)

BIOL-1191 Selected Topics
Description
Study of a topic or field not covered by other courses. Lower division offerings will provide an introductory approach to a topic. Upper division courses will involve in-depth analysis of a specific area and will usually require prerequisite courses, at the discretion of the instructor. May be repeated for credit on different topics.
Credits
1 credit
Level
Lower Division
BIOL-1391 Selected Topics
Description
Study of a topic or field not covered by other courses. Lower division offerings will provide an introductory approach to a topic. Upper division courses will involve in-depth analysis of a specific area and will usually require prerequisite courses, at the discretion of the instructor. May be repeated for credit on different topics.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
BIOL-2191 Selected Topics
Description
Study of a topic or field not covered by other courses. Lower division offerings will provide an introductory approach to a topic. Upper division courses will involve in-depth analysis of a specific area and will usually require prerequisite courses, at the discretion of the instructor. May be repeated for credit on different topics.
Credits
1 credit
Level
Lower Division
BIOL-2391 Selected Topics
Description
Study of a topic or field not covered by other courses. Lower division offerings will provide an introductory approach to a topic. Upper division courses will involve in-depth analysis of a specific area and will usually require prerequisite courses, at the discretion of the instructor. May be repeated for credit on different topics.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
BIOL-3000 BCMB Seminar
Description
Students must attend a minimum of 10 scientific seminars. Appropriate seminars are those offered by the Department of Biology, the Department of Chemistry, the Department of Physics and Astronomy, the Neuroscience Program, and/or seminars presented as part of the Distinguished Scientist Lecture Series. (Same as CHEM 3000) Pass/Fail.
Credits
0 credits
Level
Upper Division
BIOL-3190 Independent Study
Description
Individual work arranged with a faculty member on research questions in biology, as determined by the student's preparation and interests. Regular attendance at the weekly Biology Seminar (or other seminars related to the student's work) is expected. Credit may range from 1 to 3 hours per semester, and the course may be repeated up to a total of no more than 6 cumulative credit hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Credits
1 credit
Level
Upper Division
BIOL-3191 Selected Topics
Description
Study of a topic or field not covered by other courses. Lower division offerings will provide an introductory approach to a topic. Upper division courses will involve in-depth analysis of a specific area and will usually require prerequisite courses, at the discretion of the instructor. May be repeated for credit on different topics.
Credits
1 credit
Level
Upper Division
BIOL-3192 Research Internship
Description
Off-campus study in a research laboratory arranged by the student. Prior written approval of a faculty member and departmental permission are required. Guidelines are available in the departmental office. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours. Graded only on a pass-fail basis.
Credits
1 credit
Level
Upper Division
BIOL-3193 Practical Internship
Description
Off-campus study in a professional biology setting arranged by the student. Credit will be granted for internships, externships and shadowing limited to those that incorporate academic biology content. Prior written approval of a faculty member and departmental permission are required. Guidelines are available in the departmental office. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours. Graded on a pass/fail basis. Credit for BIOL 3-93 may not be used to satisfy the "three additional hours in biology at the 2000 level or higher" component of the requirements for the Biology major.
Credits
1 credit
Level
Upper Division
BIOL-3290 Independent Study
Description
Individual work arranged with a faculty member on research questions in biology, as determined by the student's preparation and interests. Regular attendance at the weekly Biology Seminar (or other seminars related to the student's work) is expected. Credit may range from 1 to 3 hours per semester, and the course may be repeated up to a total of no more than 6 cumulative credit hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Credits
2 credits
Level
Upper Division
BIOL-3291 Selected Topics
Description
Study of a topic or field not covered by other courses. Lower division offerings will provide an introductory approach to a topic. Upper division courses will involve in-depth analysis of a specific area and will usually require prerequisite courses, at the discretion of the instructor. May be repeated for credit on different topics.
Credits
2 credits
Level
Upper Division
BIOL-3292 Research Internship
Description
Off-campus study in a research laboratory arranged by the student. Prior written approval of a faculty member and departmental permission are required. Guidelines are available in the departmental office. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours. Graded only on a pass-fail basis.
Credits
2 credits
Level
Upper Division
BIOL-3293 Practical Internship
Description
Off-campus study in a professional biology setting arranged by the student. Credit will be granted for internships, externships and shadowing limited to those that incorporate academic biology content. Prior written approval of a faculty member and departmental permission are required. Guidelines are available in the departmental office. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours. Graded on a pass/fail basis. Credit for BIOL 3-93 may not be used to satisfy the "three additional hours in biology at the 2000 level or higher" component of the requirements for the Biology major.
Credits
2 credits
Level
Upper Division
BIOL-3390 Independent Study
Description
Individual work arranged with a faculty member on research questions in biology, as determined by the student's preparation and interests. Regular attendance at the weekly Biology Seminar (or other seminars related to the student's work) is expected. Credit may range from 1 to 3 hours per semester, and the course may be repeated up to a total of no more than 6 cumulative credit hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
BIOL-3391 Selected Topics
Description
Study of a topic or field not covered by other courses. Lower division offerings will provide an introductory approach to a topic. Upper division courses will involve in-depth analysis of a specific area and will usually require prerequisite courses, at the discretion of the instructor. May be repeated for credit on different topics.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
BIOL-3392 Research Internship
Description
Off-campus study in a research laboratory arranged by the student. Prior written approval of a faculty member and departmental permission are required. Guidelines are available in the departmental office. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours. Graded only on a pass-fail basis.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
BIOL-3393 Practical Internship
Description
Off-campus study in a professional biology setting arranged by the student. Credit will be granted for internships, externships and shadowing limited to those that incorporate academic biology content. Prior written approval of a faculty member and departmental permission are required. Guidelines are available in the departmental office. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours. Graded on a pass/fail basis. Credit for BIOL 3-93 may not be used to satisfy the "three additional hours in biology at the 2000 level or higher" component of the requirements for the Biology major.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
BIOL-3491 Selected Topics
Description
Study of a topic or field not covered by other courses. Lower division offerings will provide an introductory approach to a topic. Upper division courses will involve in-depth analysis of a specific area and will usually require prerequisite courses, at the discretion of the instructor. May be repeated for credit on different topics.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
BIOL-4191 Selected Topics
Description
Study of a topic or field not covered by other courses. Lower division offerings will provide an introductory approach to a topic. Upper division courses will involve in-depth analysis of a specific area and will usually require prerequisite courses, at the discretion of the instructor. May be repeated for credit on different topics.
Credits
1 credit
Level
Upper Division
BIOL-4201 Biology Senior Seminar
Description
Built around the Biology Department's seminar series, students will interact with seminar speakers visiting campus to discuss readings provided by the speaker the week before. Students will maintain a journal that briefly summarizes the readings and logs thoughts about the significance of the work, how it extends what has been learned in biology classes at Trinity, and what major questions the work raises. After the discussion, students will attend the seminar to learn about the broader context of the work. Prerequisite: Senior standing and biology major. This course may not be taken simultaneously with BIOL 3301 or BIOL 3302.
Credits
2 credits
Level
Upper Division
BIOL-4291 Selected Topics
Description
Study of a topic or field not covered by other courses. Lower division offerings will provide an introductory approach to a topic. Upper division courses will involve in-depth analysis of a specific area and will usually require prerequisite courses, at the discretion of the instructor. May be repeated for credit on different topics.
Credits
2 credits
Level
Upper Division
BIOL-4391 Selected Topics
Description
Study of a topic or field not covered by other courses. Lower division offerings will provide an introductory approach to a topic. Upper division courses will involve in-depth analysis of a specific area and will usually require prerequisite courses, at the discretion of the instructor. May be repeated for credit on different topics.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
BIOL-4398 Senior Seminar and Thesis Research I
Description
Individual research and scholarly investigation under faculty supervision leading to the preparation of a thesis. Attendance at the weekly Biology Seminar, which consists of presentations of original research from diverse fields of Biology, is required. A formal research proposal must be submitted to the department chair by the end of the add/drop period during the semester of enrollment in the course. (Offered every semester) Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of the supervising faculty member.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
BIOL-4399 Senior Seminar and Thesis Research II
Description
This course is a continuation of student projects begun in BIOL 4398. Students are required to write a thesis and make an oral presentation of their research project to the students and faculty of the department. Attendance at the weekly Biology Seminar is also required. Prerequisite: BIOL 4398 and approval of the supervising faculty member.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities

Biology (BIOL)

BIOL-1308 The Microbial Mothership
Description
Chemical, geological and fossil data suggest that the earth is about 4.5 billion years old, and that bacterial life was present on earth for at least 3 billion years before any evidence of humans is found. The emergence of complex multicellular organisms such as humans has taken place in intimate association with microbial communities; and the present-day human-microbe association, the "metaorganism", is the product of an expansive and complex coevolutionary process. We have only recently begun to recognize the complexity and importance of the interrelationships that have evolved over millennia between human and animal cells and their associated microbial communities. In this course we will develop a framework to aid our understanding of the species diversity and critical interspecies dependencies (microbe-microbe and microbe-human) that comprise the human microbial mothership. We will explore the tools and technologies used to characterize and analyze complex microbial communities. We will examine how microbial community composition influences such things as autism and diabetes. We will also explore the impact of perturbations to metaorganismal communities on health and well-being, for example the effect of antibiotics and dietary changes. (Offered every other year).
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
Approaches to Creation and Analysis, The Interdisciplinary Clusters
BIOL-1309 The Nature of Cancer
Description
This course is a survey of cancer biology examining the development, progression and treatment of the disease(s). A major emphasis will be on using a scientific framework to understand the disease along with the many myths and misperceptions. The course is designed as a studio course that includes both lectures and laboratory experiments during the class period. Additionally, there will be four required field trips during the semester that will require a total of sixteen hours on weekends. A minimum of one half of the course meeting times will be laboratory activities. (Offered every other year).
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Interdisciplinary Clusters
BIOL-1320 The Darwinian Revolution
Description
Populations change through time, and understanding how and why they change is central to the study of biology. But, this wasn't always the case. In the Nineteenth Century, as Charles Darwin was developing the theory of evolution by natural selection, most scientists and the public alike believed that plants and animals were static, not changing since the time of creation. Thus, the writings of Darwin transformed our understanding of the dynamic natural world. His ideas have further shaped the fields of medicine, agriculture, and social policy, and motivated great works of art and literature. This discussion-based course will explore the development of Darwin's revolutionary ideas through a survey of his life, his major written works, and the influence of his writing on modern thinking. (Offered every year).
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Interdisciplinary Clusters, The Core Capacities
BIOL-1322 The Ecology and Bioconservation of China
Description
The course will focus on the fundamentals of ecology and how these are important in determining the current distribution and abundance of plants and animals in China. The course will also examine the current human impacts on native biodiversity in China and what conservation practices are in place. Through this course students will engage in a collaborative group project in which they will collect data on a particular element of biodiversity near the United International College (UIC), Zhuhai, China. (Offered Occasionally).
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Interdisciplinary Clusters, Approaches to Creation and Analysis, The Core Capacities
BIOL-2301 Advanced Placement Biology
Description
Students earning a 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement Biology exam or a 5, 6, or 7 on the Higher-Level International Baccalaureate Exam will receive credit for this course.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
BIOL-2306 Infectious Diseases
Description
This course will examine the biology of infectious diseases and the role of these diseases in global and public health policy. The lecture will consider disease organisms ranging from viral to helminthic and their associated vectors. The laboratory component of this lab/lecture course could focus on a number of aspects such as: 1) transmission of disease by water, 2) the role of sanitation in disease prevention, and 3) examination of selected life cycles of infectious agents as the contribute to disease. Trips to local public health sites are required and will take place outside of the regular class schedule. (Offered every other year). Prerequisite: BIOL 1311 and 1111
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
" "
James (Jim) Shinkle, Ph.D.
Department Chair
Professor
Gerard M. J. Beaudoin, III
Gerard M. J. Beaudoin, III, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
" "
Jessica Callery
Study Compliance Monitor/Research Associate
dougherty john headshot
Jonathan Dougherty, Ph.D.
Visiting Assistant Professor
Frank Healy
Frank Healy, Ph.D.
Professor
" "
Tomas Hrbek, Ph.D.
Cowles Distinguished Professor
Kevin Livingstone
Kevin Livingstone, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Kelly Lyons
Kelly Lyons, Ph.D.
Professor
Headshot of Troy Murphy
Troy Murphy, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
" "
Brittany Slabach, Ph.D.
Visiting Assistant Professor
Headshot of Bethany Strunk
Bethany Strunk, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
" "
Asha Mary Thomas
Research Assistant

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