East Asian Studies at Trinity (EAST) is an interdisciplinary undergraduate degree program that combines the intensive study of East Asian languages and cultures with the study of the social sciences and business in an East Asian context. For each student, the study of the language will be fully integrated with the study of other disciplines through each year of the college career, ensuring that the graduate will not only be proficient in the language, but that he or she will have achieved an advanced level of understanding across the curriculum. 

East Asian Studies (EAST)

EAST-2315 East Asian Heroes
Description
This course Introduces literary works that have contributed to discourses about heroes in contemporary East Asia. We will study how the portrayals of heroes reflect historical, social, and cultural changes. Classical and early modern literary texts are analyzed in the contexts of contemporary cultural products. Discussions focus on how narratives of heroes have been one of the most indispensable sources for the construction of political and cultural identities. We also examine how narratives about heroes have evolved to express historically and culturally specific experience and agendas. (Offered every year).
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
Approaches to Creation and Analysis, The Interdisciplinary Clusters, The Core Capacities, The Interdisciplinary Clusters
EAST-2316 The Folk Ecology of Fengshui
Description
This course will survey the environmental history of China, then will delve into the theory and practice of both Form School and Compass School fengshui, and finally will analyze the proposition that fengshui is a type of "folk" ecology. (Offered every other year)
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Interdisciplinary Clusters, The Interdisciplinary Clusters
EAST-2321 Asian Americans &translingual Identities
Description
As a panethnicty, Asian Americans are brought together by a linguistic diversity that defies mainstream monolingual paradigms. To many Asian Americans, various degrees of exposures to two or more languages create a translingual dimension in identity formation. By problematizing monolingual paradigms and adopting multi-/translingual conceptual frameworks, this course explores how crossings between languages shape Asian American identities and representations. (Offered occasionally.)
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Core Capacities
Stephen Lee Field
Stephen Lee Field, Ph.D.
Co-Director
J.K. and Ingrid Lee Endowed Professor of Chinese Language & Literature, Modern Languages and Literatures
Jie Zhang
Jie Zhang, Ph.D.
Co-Director
Associate Professor, Modern Languages and Literatures
Headshot of faculty member Daniel Lehrmann
Daniel Lehrmann, Ph.D.
Gertrude and Walter Pyron Professor of Geosciences, Geosciences
Zhaoxi Liu
Zhaoxi Liu, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Communication
Randall Nadeau
Randall Nadeau, Ph.D.
Professor, Religion
Hyon Joo Yoo
Hyon Joo Yoo, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Political Science
Shage Zhang
Shage Zhang, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Finance and Decision Sciences

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