Advanced Logic (PHIL)

PHIL-3340 Symbolic Logic II
Description
PHIL 3340, Symbolic Logic II, Topics include: Review of first-order logic from a more abstract perspective than that taken in PHIL 2340; introduction to set theory; basic metalogical results including soundness, completeness, compactness, the Lowenheim-Skolem theorem, and Godel's incompleteness theorems; connections with issues in computability theory and the foundations of mathematics. Prerequisite: PHIL 2340 or consent of instructor, or CSCI 1323.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
Approaches to Creation and Analysis
PHIL-3343 Nonclassical Logics
Description
Extensions of, and alternatives to, classical logic. Possible topics include modal logic, intuitionistic logic, many-valued logic, and fuzzy logic. Some attention is paid to connections between these logics and topics in philosophy, computer science, and linguistics. Prerequisite: PHIL 2340 or consent of instructor
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division

History of Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL-3410 Classical Greek Philosophy
Description
A study of the major figures in ancient Greek philosophy from Thales to Aristotle, with a special focus on thinkers of the high classical period: Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. Prerequisite: Any 3 or 4 credit course in Philosophy or consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Interdisciplinary Clusters, The Core Capacities
PHIL-3422 Early Modern Philosophy
Description
A study of the classical modern philosophers, including the Rationalists: Descartes, Leibniz, and Spinoza; the Empiricists: Locke, Berkeley, and Hume; and the attempted synthesis of Kant. (Offered every year). Prerequisite: Any course in Philosophy or consent of instructor
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Interdisciplinary Clusters, The Core Capacities, The Core Capacities
PHIL-3423 German Idealism
Description
A study of important thinkers and movements at the beginning of the 19th century. We will focus initially on Kant, and investigate how German Idealism and Romanticism developed in the aftermath of Kant's critical philosophy. After an extended treatment of Hegel, we will look at the young Hegelians and Marx. The course will focus on issues in metaphysics, epistemology, the philosophy of history and the problem of subjectivity. (Also listed as GRST 3460.)(Offered every other year). Prerequisite: Any course in philosophy or consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Interdisciplinary Clusters, The Core Capacities

Metaphysics and Epistemology (PHIL)

PHIL-3430 Metaphysics
Description
A survey of traditional and contemporary philosophical issues about the nature of reality. Typical topics covered include some of the following: the mind-body problem, personal identity, free will and determinism, causation, time, fatalism, universals and particulars, essentialism, possible worlds. (Offered every other year). Prerequisites: Any course in Philosophy or Consent of Instructor
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
PHIL-3431 Philosophy of Mind
Description
A critical study of contemporary approaches to the mind-body problem, including dualism, behaviorism, the identity theory, and functionalism. Also addressed will be such other issues as the nature of mental representation, the possibility of artificial intelligence, and the sources of intentionality. (Offered every other year). Prerequisite: Any 3 or 4 credit course in Philosophy or consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
PHIL-3439 Epistemology
Description
A critical study of problems in the theory of knowledge, such as: the difference between knowledge and belief; the possibility of knowledge; the conditions under which a belief is rational. Prerequisite: Any 3 or 4 credit course in Philosophy or consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities

Seminars and Special Courses (PHIL)

PHIL-3180 Philosophy for Children
Description
This is a service learning class in which students learn the theory and practice of teaching philosophy to children. Students will attend a weekly class at Trinity in which they study and discuss educational theory, and learn about methods for teaching children philosophy. They also create and discuss various lesson plans. They then visit a public school where they meet with small groups of children and lead discussions of philosophy. May be repeated for credit. 1 to 3 semester hours. Prerequisites: One course in Philosophy or Education or consent of instructor.
Credits
1 credit
Level
Upper Division
PHIL-3190 Directed Studies
Description
Individual work under faculty supervision. 1 to 4 semester hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
Credits
1 credit
Level
Upper Division
PHIL-3191 Internship in Law and Philosophy
Description
Students taking this class will work for various law of government offices as interns whose responsibilities will be determined by those offices and by supervising faculty. They will then complete a writing assignment in which they relate their experience in the internship to issues in ethics, social and political philosophy, and/or the philosophy of law. Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor
Credits
1 credit
Level
Upper Division
PHIL-3280 Philosophy for Children
Description
This is a service learning class in which students learn the theory and practice of teaching philosophy to children. Students will attend a weekly class at Trinity in which they study and discuss educational theory, and learn about methods for teaching children philosophy. They also create and discuss various lesson plans. They then visit a public school where they meet with small groups of children and lead discussions of philosophy. May be repeated for credit. 1 to 3 semester hours. Prerequisites: One course in Philosophy or Education or consent of instructor.
Credits
2 credits
Level
Upper Division
PHIL-3290 Directed Studies
Description
Individual work under faculty supervision. 1 to 4 semester hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
Credits
2 credits
Level
Upper Division
PHIL-3291 Internship in Law and Philosophy
Description
Students taking this class will work for various law of government offices as interns whose responsibilities will be determined by those offices and by supervising faculty. They will then complete a writing assignment in which they relate their experience in the internship to issues in ethics, social and political philosophy, and/or the philosophy of law. Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor
Credits
2 credits
Level
Upper Division
PHIL-3380 Philosophy for Children
Description
This is a service learning class in which students learn the theory and practice of teaching philosophy to children. Students will attend a weekly class at Trinity in which they study and discuss educational theory, and learn about methods for teaching children philosophy. They also create and discuss various lesson plans. They then visit a public school where they meet with small groups of children and lead discussions of philosophy. May be repeated for credit. 1 to 3 semester hours. Prerequisites: One course in Philosophy or Education or consent of instructor.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Interdisciplinary Clusters
PHIL-3390 Directed Studies
Description
Individual work under faculty supervision. 1 to 4 semester hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
PHIL-3391 Internship in Law and Philosophy
Description
Students taking this class will work for various law of government offices as interns whose responsibilities will be determined by those offices and by supervising faculty. They will then complete a writing assignment in which they relate their experience in the internship to issues in ethics, social and political philosophy, and/or the philosophy of law. Pass/Fail only. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
PHIL-3490 Directed Studies
Description
Individual work under faculty supervision. 1 to 4 semester hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
PHIL-4180 Readings in Philosophy
Description
A close reading of a seminal philosophical text. Pass / Fail only. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: one class in philosophy and consent of instructor
Credits
1 credit
Level
Upper Division
PHIL-4190 Directed Studies
Description
Individual work under faculty supervision. 1 to 4 semester hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Credits
1 credit
Level
Upper Division
PHIL-4290 Directed Studies
Description
Individual work under faculty supervision. 1 to 4 semester hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Credits
2 credits
Level
Upper Division
PHIL-4390 Directed Studies
Description
Individual work under faculty supervision. 1 to 4 semester hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
PHIL-4395 Senior Thesis
Description
Research and classroom discussion culminating, for each student, in a thesis to be defended before Philosophy Department faculty. Supervision for thesis provided by course instructor and a second faculty member with expertise in student's area of research. Prerequisites: Senior Standing and consent of the department chair.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
PHIL-4396 Thesis I
Description
Taken during the Spring semester of the Junior year. Students draft a thesis under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed draft will be defended before the members of the department, who will decide whether it should be developed further. Students who do outstanding work in Thesis I will be invited to enroll in Thesis II. Students who take Thesis II are not eligible to enroll in PHIL 4395 (Senior Thesis). Requires consent of chair and Instructor.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
PHIL-4397 Thesis II
Description
Taken during the Fall semester of the Senior Year. In thesis II students will complete the theses that they drafted in Thesis I. The completed essay will be defended before the members of the department, who will decide whether to confer Departmental Honors. Requires Consent of Department chair and Instructor, and completion of PHIL 4396.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
PHIL-4490 Directed Studies
Description
Individual work under faculty supervision. 1 to 4 semester hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
PHIL-4491 Seminar on a Philosophical Problem
Description
An in-depth study of a contemporary problem in philosophy. Prerequisite: 8 upper-division hours or consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
PHIL-4492 Seminar on a Philosopher
Description
A careful analysis of the work of a particular philosopher. Topics may vary but include: A. Aristotle; B. Austin; D. Descartes; E. Hegel F. Locke; K. Kant; M. Marx; P. Plato; W. Wittgenstein; Z. other figures. Prerequisite: 8 upper-division hours in Philosophy of consent of instructor
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
PHIL-4493 Seminar on a Philosophical Movement
Description
An intensive study of works of the philosophers in a particular philosophical school or movement. The seminar may take a chronological approach or it may be topical in structure. Prerequisite: 8 upper-division hours in philosophy.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division

Value Theory (PHIL)

PHIL-3361 Theorizing Myth
Description
A survey of theoretical approaches to myth from the eighteenth century to the present. This survey begins with the transition from renaissance belief that myth is a form of moral instruction conveyed by allegory to the romantic belief that myth is a symbolic mode of discourse offering insight into transcendental reality. We will then chart the evolution of this approach, beginning with its inspiration in Kantian metaphysics and earliest formulations by German romantics such as Schiller and proceeding on to Freud and Ricoeur. A second strand begins with Hegel's theories of "false consciousness" that would in time develop into interpretations of myth as ideology , under the influence of Marx, Adorno, and Althusser. A final strand begins with the early folklorists, the brothers Grimm, and would in time develop into functionalist approaches to myth by anthropologists such as Malinowski, Boas, and Levi-Strauss. The resulting big picture is as much an intellectual history of modernity as a history of theorizing myth.(Also listed as CLAS 3350.) Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Interdisciplinary Clusters
PHIL-3454 Philosophy of Sex, Gender, & Sexuality
Description
A study of issues in the philosophy of gender, through reading the work of historical and contemporary theorists. Topics may include the ontology of sex, gender, and sexuality; the nature and goals of feminism; gendered language; same-sex marriage; the ethics of consent; pornography; and prostitution. (Offered every other year). Prerequisite: Any 3 or 4 credit course in Philosophy or WAGS 2310, 2350, 2351, or 2352, or consent of instructor
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Interdisciplinary Clusters
PHIL-3457 Philosophy of Film & Videogames
Description
A study of issues in the philosophy of film, through reading the work of historical and contemporary philosophers and critics, and studying films. Topics may include: the nature of film, its status amongst the arts, issues of authorship and narrativity, issues of interpretation, and the nature and ethics of documentary. (offered every other year). Prerequisite: Any course in Philosophy, or Introduction to Film Studies (COMM 1302 or FILM 1301), or International Cinema (COMM 3320 or FILM 3320), or consent of Instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Interdisciplinary Clusters, The Core Capacities
PHIL-3459 Biomedical Ethics
Description
A study of ethical issues associated with the practice of medicine and the pursuit of biomedical research. Topics may include: physicians' obligations and patients' rights; experimentation on humans and animals; assisted suicide; euthanasia; abortion and parental rights; genetic engineering; and social justice and the right to health care.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Interdisciplinary Clusters

Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL-1301 Knowledge, Reality, and the Good Life
Description
An introduction to philosophy, emphasizing central issues in epistemology, metaphysics, and ethics. Typical topics include: the problem of evil, the mind-body problem, the possibility of knowledge, the existence of God, personal identity, freedom and determinism, the good life, and what makes actions right or wrong.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
Approaches to Creation and Analysis
PHIL-1341 Tools for Reasoning
Description
Reasoning is the process of using the evidence available to us in order to make informed decisions about what to believe and do. Good reasoning requires the ability to identify and assess deductive arguments; to formulate hypotheses, test them, and choose those that are best supported by the evidence; and to assess which courses of action are most reasonable given our beliefs and values. This class will introduce a number of tools that are useful for reasoning, including deductive logic, probability and statistics, and decision theory. The course will also consider problem-solving techniques and ways of evaluating the credibility of sources.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
PHIL-1350 Environmental Ethics
Description
A study of the moral status of the things and creatures that make up the environment, and their moral relationship to people. Particular attention will be given to the responsibilities of people to protect and preserve the environment, and to conserve resources for future generations. (Offered every year).
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Interdisciplinary Clusters, The Interdisciplinary Clusters
PHIL-1354 Ethics
Description
An introduction to traditional and contemporary problems and theories in ethics.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
Approaches to Creation and Analysis, The Interdisciplinary Clusters
PHIL-1359 Professional Ethics
Description
A critical Examination of ethics and ethical issues involved in professional life. Typical topics will include the following: ethical theory, theory of justice, professional codes of conduct, corporate responsibility, harassment policy, affirmative action, the moral status of animals, experimentation using animal and human subjects, the physician-patient relationship, reproductive ethics, and health care policy. (Also listed as BUSN 1359.) PHIL 1354 and PHIL 1359 may not both be taken for credit.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
Approaches to Creation and Analysis
PHIL-2310 Philosophy of the Americas
Description
This class is an introduction to a variety of philosophies originating in the Americas. In particular, this class will focus on traditional Mesoamerican, contemporary indigenous, and Latin American philosophies. We will look at metaphysical, ethical, and political problems, and the variety of perspectives offered by this wide array of philosophical theories. We will also focus on the distinctive analysis of colonialism and decolonization offered in the American context.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
Approaches to Creation and Analysis, The Core Capacities
PHIL-2340 Symbolic Logic I
Description
An introduction to formal deductive logic, covering propositional logic (truth-functional logic) and first-order predicate logic (quantification theory). Typical topics covered include: techniques of symbolization, truth tables, validity and soundness, and techniques of natural deduction. Symbolic notation is used extensively. Does not require 1341 as a prerequisite.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
Approaches to Creation and Analysis
PHIL-2425 Existentialism
Description
A study of existentialism and its application to social justice. Readings in the class will include existentialist perspectives on racism, sexism, colonialism, and antisemitism.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
Approaches to Creation and Analysis, The Core Capacities, The Interdisciplinary Clusters, The Core Capacities
PHIL-2438 Philosophy of Religion
Description
A critical discussion of philosophical issues arising in religion and theology. Typical topics covered include: religious language, arguments for God's existence, religious experience, miracles and revelation, the relationship of faith and reason, the nature of God, the problem of evil, death and immortality. (Also listed as RELI 2460.)
Credits
4 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
Approaches to Creation and Analysis, The Core Capacities, The Interdisciplinary Clusters
PHIL-2455 Aesthetics
Description
A study of issues in the philosophy of the arts, through the examination of works of art and the reading of historical and contemporary philosophers and critics. Topics to be discussed include: what makes something a work of art, the nature of artistic representation, the evaluation of works of art, and problems peculiar to such specific art forms as literature, painting, music, and film.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
Approaches to Creation and Analysis, The Core Capacities
PHIL-2456 Applied Ethics
Description
An application of ethical theory to a particular moral issue. Each offering will focus on a specific issue or a set of closely related issues; topics will vary from one offering to the next. Examples of topics which may be covered include: abortion; genetic engineering; environmental justice; urban issues such as group discrimination, housing restrictions, regulation of vice, and city planning; and truth in advertising and whistle blowing.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
Approaches to Creation and Analysis, The Core Capacities, The Interdisciplinary Clusters
PHIL-2457 The Meaning of Life
Description
A critical examination of a wide range of approaches to the question, "Does life have meaning?" Among the philosophers to be covered are Aristotle, Tolstoy, Kant, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Camus, Miguel de Unamuno, and Thomas Nagel.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
Approaches to Creation and Analysis, The Core Capacities, The Interdisciplinary Clusters
PHIL-2460 Ancient Science and Medicine
Description
An overview of science and medicine in antiquity, with an emphasis on its relation to ancient philosophy. Topics typically include: astronomy, cosmology, physics, biology, and medicine. The course will focus on such figures as Anaximander, Hippocrates, Plato, Aristotle, Eudoxus, Hierophilus, Ptolemy, and Galen. (Offered every other year.)
Credits
4 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Interdisciplinary Clusters
PHIL-3411 Hellenistic Philosophy
Description
A study of the dominant philosophical schools after the death of Aristotle - Stoics, Epicureans,and Skeptics - with a particular emphasis on ethics (virtue ethics, hedonism) and epistemology. Prerequisite: Any 3 or 4 credit course in Philosophy or consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Interdisciplinary Clusters, The Core Capacities
PHIL-3412 Late Ancient and Medieval Philosophy
Description
A study of philosophical problems that arose in the historical and intellectual context of Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages. The course will include topics in metaphysics, philosophy of religion, ethics, and mysticism. It will emphasize the ancient origins of Medieval thought, and clarify the intellectual roots of Christianity by discussion of the key notions, ideas and figures that crucially contributed to shaping Western culture. (Offered every other year). Prerequisite: Any 3 or 4 credit course in Philosophy or consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Interdisciplinary Clusters
PHIL-3422 Modern European Philosophy
Description
A study of the European philosophers of the 17th and 18th centuries, including Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza, Cavendish, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Hume, and Kant. (Offered every year). Prerequisite: Any course in Philosophy or consent of instructor
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Interdisciplinary Clusters, The Core Capacities, The Core Capacities
PHIL-3423 German Idealism
Description
A study of important thinkers and movements at the beginning of the 19th century. We will focus initially on Kant, and investigate how German Idealism and Romanticism developed in the aftermath of Kant's critical philosophy. After an extended treatment of Hegel, we will look at the young Hegelians and Marx. The course will focus on issues in metaphysics, epistemology, the philosophy of history and the problem of subjectivity. (Also listed as GRST 3460.)(Offered every other year). Prerequisite: Any 3 or 4 credit course in Philosophy or consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Interdisciplinary Clusters, The Core Capacities
PHIL-3426 Nietzsche and German Philosophy
Description
A study of the important thinkers and movements at the end of the 19th century. We will focus initially on Kant before seeing how Schopenhauer and finally Nietzsche developed on the basis of the Kantian philosophy. After an extended treatment of Nietzsche, we will look at how Freud and psychoanalysis grew out of this tradition. The course will focus on issues in epistemology, the philosophy of art, the philosophy of nature, and the development of the notion of the unconscious. (Also listed as GRST 3461.) (Offered every other year). Prerequisite: Any 3 or 4 credit course in Philosophy or consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Interdisciplinary Clusters, The Core Capacities, The Core Capacities
PHIL-3428 The Philosophies of China
Description
A study of the three major indigenous philosophical movements in China: Confucianism, Taoism, and Neo-Confucianism. Special attention will be paid to themes and problems common to all three movements, including: the metaphysics of harmony and conflict, the individual and society the cultivation of human virtues and human perfectibility, and humankind's relation to nature. Course taught in English. (Also listed as CHIN 3428.)(Offered occasionally). Prerequisite: Any 3 or 4 credit course in Philosophy or consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Interdisciplinary Clusters
PHIL-3429 Continental Philosophy
Description
A close reading of some of the major texts of twentieth-century French and German philosophy, with some attention to their roots in nineteenth- century philosophy. Prerequisites: Any 3 or 4 credit course in Philosophy or consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
PHIL-3430 Metaphysics
Description
A survey of traditional and contemporary philosophical issues about the nature of reality. Typical topics covered include some of the following: the mind-body problem, personal identity, free will and determinism, causation, time, fatalism, universals and particulars, essentialism, possible worlds. (Offered every other year). Prerequisites: Any 3 or 4 credit course in Philosophy or consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
PHIL-3432 Philosophy of Science
Description
A study of philosophical views about the sciences. Topics may include: explanation, confirmation, the historical development of science, realism vs. anti-realism, the relation between the natural and social sciences, and the difference between science and pseudo-science. (Offered every other year). Prerequisites: Both PHIL 2340 and an additional 3 or 4 credit course in Philosophy.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Interdisciplinary Clusters
PHIL-3433 Philosophy of Language
Description
A critical study of contemporary issues about language, meaning, reference, translation, and interpretation. (Offered every other year). Prerequisites: Both PHIL 2340 and an additional 3 or 4 credit course in Philosophy.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Interdisciplinary Clusters
PHIL-3450 Metaethics
Description
A study of contemporary attempts to answer the question of whether there are moral facts or whether any moral claims are objective. (Offered every other year) Prerequisite: Any 3 or 4 credit course in Philosophy or consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Interdisciplinary Clusters
PHIL-3451 Social and Political Philosophy
Description
A critical study of philosophical views about society and politics, with particular attention to the concepts of sovereignty, obligation, rights, justice, equality, and liberty. Prerequisite: Any 3 or 4 credit course in Philosophy or consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Interdisciplinary Clusters
PHIL-3452 Ethical Theory
Description
A discussion of issues in normative ethics and metaethics. Typical topics covered include some of the following: the meaning of ethical terms, the justification or moral principles and judgments, intrinsic and extrinsic value, consequentialism and deontology, moral relativism, natural rights, theories of justice. Prerequisite: Any 3 or 4 credit course in Philosophy or consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Interdisciplinary Clusters
PHIL-3453 Philosophy of Law
Description
A critical study of legal theory, legal reasoning, and the role of law in contemporary society. Prerequisite: Any 3 or 4 credit course in Philosophy or consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Interdisciplinary Clusters
PHIL-3455 Philosophy of Race
Description
Most people agree that racism is bad (evil, immoral, unjust). Yet beneath this consensus we find deep disagreements about what racism is, what makes it so bad, and what we should do about it. This course offers an opportunity to probe our convictions about some deeply held beliefs on significant issues, including reparations for slavery, racial profiling, immigration, and desegregation. Students will seek out the best arguments that can be marshaled on behalf of their moral and political views, identify the vulnerabilities of these arguments, and seek to understand those who disagree by considering the strongest arguments for the views they reject. Our understanding of our own values will deepen and may shift in the process. We will emerge from this investigation with a clearer grasp of what racism is, why it is wrong, and what a world without racism might look like.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Core Capacities, The Interdisciplinary Clusters
PHIL-3458 Philosophy of Music
Description
In this course we will investigate several philosophical issues raised by music, from the question of what exactly music is, through the nature of various musical objects (works, performances, recordings), to how we should approach music, and what its value is. Throughout we will question how far the theories we discuss can be applied beyond their (typical) application to Western classical music. Students will be expected to bring their experience- as composers, performers, and listeners- to bear on the issues we discuss. (Also listed as MUSC 3458.) (Offered every other year.) Prerequisite: Any 3 or 4 credit course in Philosophy, or 3 credits in Music, or consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
PHIL-3460 Philosophy of Literature
Description
In this course we will investigate several philosophical issues raised by literature, such as what exactly literature is, the nature of literary authorship and interpretation, why it is we respond emotionally to fictional characters, and what the value of engaging with literature is. (Offered every other year). Prerequisite: Any 3 or 4 credit course in Philosophyor six hours of English or consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
Judith Norman
Judith Norman, Ph.D.
Department Chair
Professor
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Joseph B. Bullock, Ph.D.
Visiting Assistant Professor
" "
Shirley Durst
Academic Office Manager
Headshot of Ronni Gura Sadovsky
Ronni Gura Sadovsky, J.D./Ph.D.
Assistant Professor

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