C-reactive Protein (CRP)


Description

CRP was first identified in 1930 as a substance in the serum of patients with acute inflammation that reacted with the "C" carbohydrate antibody of the capsule of pneumococcus (Tillett and Francis 1930). CRP is a pentameric protein synthesized by the liver and is an acute-phase reactant protein that is primarily induced by the IL-6 action on the gene responsible for transcription of CRP during the acute phase of an inflammatory/infectious process. There are numerous causes of an elevated CRP, including acute and chronic conditions, and these can be infectious or non-infectious in etiology; trauma can also cause elevations in CRP (alarmin response), and more modest elevations tend to be associated with a broader spectrum of etiologies, ranging from sleep disturbances and aging to periodontal disease (Nehring and Patel 2019). There are no available assays for marmoset CRP.


Alignment

Protein alignment for human, rhesus macaque and marmoset CRP:

image of Protein alignment for human, rhesus macaque and marmoset C-reactive Protein (CRP)

 

Protein alignment for marmoset, owl monkey, and squirrel monkey CRP:

Protein alignment for marmoset, owl monkey, and squirrel monkey CRP

 

References

  • Nehring, S. M. and B. C. Patel (2019). C Reactive Protein (CRP). StatPearls. Treasure Island (FL).
  • Tillett, W. S. and T. Francis (1930). "Serological Reactions in Pneumonia with a Non-Protein Somatic Fraction of Pneumococcus." J Exp Med 52(4): 561-571.

 

Status

Several monoclonal antibody pairs have been developed and are being validated.