History(B.A.)
History(Minor)

African History (HIST)

HIST-1300 The African Experience
Description
This course introduces students to aspects of African history and their relation to contemporary issues. The approach is interdisciplinary and incorporates visual and literary documents. Topics may include the politics of antiquity, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, the historical development of Islam, Christianization, colonization and decolonization, with particular attention to West Africa and the Ethiopian region.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
HIST-1301 The African Experience 2
Description
This is an introduction to Africa since 1800. The course will use a mix of lectures and classroom discussions to study African history, focusing on Africa's connections with other parts of the world, including the Americas; topics will include the trans-Atlantic slave trade and European imperialism and the African diaspora. Reading assignments will include primary sources. (Offered every Spring.)
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
Approaches to Creation and Analysis, The Core Capacities
HIST-3304 Religion in African History
Description
Focuses on the role of religious identity in African history. Topics may include the histories of specific religious movements, the ways in which gender and leadership have intersected in new religious movements, the spread of Islam, Sufi orders, European missionary activities, African responses to non-African Christian missionizing, African missionary activities, and the interactions of different religious traditions and communities. Focus is on the period since 1800. Prerequisite: HIST 1300 or consent of instructor.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
HIST-3400 Gender Matters in African History
Description
Focuses on the history of women in Africa from 1800 to the present. Topics may include the family, marriage, childhood, education, sports, and recreation, work and the workplace, politics and political life, labor movements, and women's movements.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities

Ancient Greece and Rome (HIST)

HIST-1310 Ancient Greece and Rome
Description
A historical introduction to selected aspects of the political, cultural, and intellectual life of the Greek and Roman world, with particular attention to the Greek and Roman contribution to western civilization.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
HIST-1311 Gender and Identity in the Ancient World
Description
An examination of the roles of women and men in society, religion, and culture of the ancient world. Readings will include historical, religious, medical, legal, philosophical, and literary texts. Representations of men and women in the visual arts will also be considered.(Also listed as CLAS 1307.)
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Interdisciplinary Clusters
HIST-1312 Greeks, Romans, and Barbarians
Description
This course gives students an opportunity to examine the cultures and achievements of peoples labeled "barbarians" by the ancient Greeks and Romans. Students will use a broad selection of historical documents originating from the Near East, Egypt, Greece and Rome, as well as the results of archaeological research, for investigating the social structures and values of these cultures. Critical methods for interpreting ancient and modern evidence about these societies will also be discussed. (Also listed as CLAS 1312.)
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
HIST-3310 Archaic and Classical Greece
Description
A study of Greek history from the age of colonization to the death of Alexander the Great (c. 750-323 B.C.), with emphasis on the social and political institutions of Athens and Sparta, relations between Persia and the Greeks, the period of the Peloponnesian War, and the rise of Macedon.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-3314 The Mediterranean World in the Hellenistic Age
Description
A study of the Hellenistic world, including Rome and Carthage, Ptolemaic Egypt, and other Hellenistic kingdoms, with emphasis on the range of Hellenistic culture and the growing power of Rome, from the death of Alexander to the battle of Actium (323-31 B.C.).
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-3318 Ancient Rome: Late Republic and Early Empire
Description
A study of the political, social, and cultural history of ancient Rome, with particular emphasis on the late Republic and early Empire (ca. 150 B.C.E. to 150 C.E.). (Offered every other year.)
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
Approaches to Creation and Analysis
HIST-3319 The World of Late Antiquity
Description
A study of the political, cultural, and religious life of the Roman Empire from the second to the fifth centuries CE-a vital transitional period between the classical and medieval worlds. Beginning with the "golden age" of the Antonine emperors, this course examines the military and political "crisis" of the third century, the Christianization of the empire in the fourth, and the religious and cultural conflicts that accompanied the fragmentation of power in the fifth. (Also listed as CLAS 3319.) Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or Consent of Instructor
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Interdisciplinary Clusters

Asian History (HIST)

HIST-1320 History of China
Description
China from the bronze age through the communist revolution, with special emphasis on institutions, social and family life, philosophy and religion, and the effects of revolution and modernization. Survey readings supplemented by primary sources and a research component.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Interdisciplinary Clusters, The Interdisciplinary Clusters, The Core Capacities
HIST-1324 Modern East Asia
Description
A survey of the East Asian region since 1800 that addresses the modern histories of China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. The course begins with late traditional patterns and covers the stresses of imperialism and colonialism, the emergence of revolutionary independence movements, Communism, and the ordeals of war and economic modernization.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Interdisciplinary Clusters, The Core Capacities
HIST-3320 The Rise of Modern China
Description
Studies of modern Chinese history since 1800, with emphasis on the processes of modernization, the major phases of the Chinese revolution from the experience with Western imperialism through the Republican period and the emergence of the People's Republic of China. Class methods emphasize reading primary sources in translation and research and writing. Course taught in English. (Also listed as CHIN 3320.) Prerequisite: HIST 1320 or consent of instructor.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-3420 Masculinity and Femininity in China, 1500-Present
Description
This class will critically examine changing notions of masculinity and femininity in China from the Ming dynasty to the present. In it, students will grapple with the following questions: How have culture and history shaped the categories of "woman" and "man"? What are the lines we draw between these categories, have the relationships among them changed over time ? How have class, status, and divisions of labor influenced the shaping of normative gender roles and sexualities, as well as actual patterns of behavior? How has gender performance interacted with the body? Who has the power to define masculine and feminine traits? (Offered every other year.)
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Interdisciplinary Clusters
HIST-3426 Race and Ethnicity in East Asia
Description
This class applies an historical lens to the categories of race and ethnicity as they developed in China, Japan, and Korea from 1800 to the present, drawing as well upon the experience of Southeast Asia for comparison. At its core, this class will approach race and ethnicity not as a priori concepts, but as historically contingent categories that emerge, evolve, and, most importantly, have the capacity to transform reality. We will investigate ethnicity and race from multiple perspectives-from the local and regional, to the national and global-as well as how they intersected with other subjectivities, such as gender, class, and national identities. (Offered every other year).
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Core Capacities

European History (HIST)

HIST-1332 Medieval Europe
Description
Europe from fall of Roman Empire through the 14th century; rise of Christianity; barbarian invasions; development of feudalism; rebirth of urban civilization and achievements of medieval culture. Attention to social and political developments and major thinkers of the period. Lecture and discussion format.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
Approaches to Creation and Analysis, The Interdisciplinary Clusters, The Core Capacities, The Core Capacities
HIST-1333 Medieval Christianity: Tradition and Transformation, 200-1200
Description
This course will focus on the emergence, spread, and development of Christian religion and culture in western Europe between 200 and 1200. Topics may include: Christianity in the Roman Empire; missionary activity in the early Middle ages; biblical and theological writings; growth of the western Church and papacy; traditions of worship and belief, including saints' cults and monasticism; Christian kingship and holy war; and interactions with non-Christians and heretics.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
Approaches to Creation and Analysis, The Interdisciplinary Clusters, The Core Capacities
HIST-1334 Early Modern Europe (1500-1815)
Description
Chief cultural and political developments from the Renaissance through the Napoleonic Empire, including the Reformation, Counter Reformation, Thirty-Years War, Puritan Revolution, rise of absolute monarchy, the Enlightenment, and the French Revolution. Special emphasis on religion and social change, church-state relations, ideals of religious reform, and critiques of religion itself.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
HIST-1335 Modern Europe
Description
Chief economic, political and social developments in European society since 1815, including the Industrial Revolution, Marxism, the Russian Revolution, political and economic imperialism, World Wars I and II, the Great Depression and the rise of totalitarian states.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
Approaches to Creation and Analysis, The Core Capacities
HIST-2430 Medieval Kingship: Power, Patronage, and Propaganda, 750 - 1035
Description
This writing-intensive seminar-style course will introduce historical methods and skills through the study of three medieval kings: Charlemagne, Emperor of the Franks; Otto I, Emperor of Germany; and Cnut the great, King of England, Norway, and Denmark. We will examine primary sources, conduct secondary research, and develop our own historical hypothesis about the significance of these kings and their reigns. Writing assignments will include source analyses, secondary critiques, and a final research project.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Interdisciplinary Clusters, The Core Capacities
HIST-2432 European Frontiers 1848 - Present
Description
Analyzes the shifting borders of Modern Europe, ones often accompanied by deadly consequences in the eastern two-thirds of the continent. In particular, this course will examine how physical and societal borders have been redrawn to create categories of inclusion and exclusion in Modern Europe. (Also listed as GRST 2432.) (Offered every other year).
Credits
4 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
HIST-3334 Modern Germany
Description
History of Modern Germany, including the Second Empire, Weimar Republic, National Socialism, two post-World War II German states, and the unified Federal Republic. (Also listed as GRST 3334.)
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
HIST-3337 The French Revolution
Description
History of France from the middle of the eighteenth century to the coup of Napoleon in 1799. The course will focus on the political, fiscal, and intellectual origins of the French Revolution (1789-1799), the unfolding of the Revolution in Paris and in the provinces from the calling of the Estates-General to the Reign of Terror, international war between France and Europe, and the Revolution's long-term consequences for French and European history. (Offered every other year.)
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
HIST-3431 Early Medieval England: 500-1100
Description
This course explores the history and culture of early medieval England, from c.500 through the eleventh century-an era traditionally known as the Anglo-Saxon period. Themes may include invasion and conquest; kingship and government; art, archaeology, and manuscript production; Old English language and literature; and religious history, notably the development of Christian practices and institutions in the British Isles. The course will be structured around student discussion, research, and writing. (Offered every other year.)
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Core Capacities
HIST-3432 Vikings, Saxons, and Franks: the Barbarian North, 500-1300
Description
This discussion-driven course examines concepts of barbarism and civilization among three medieval populations: the Vikings, Saxons, and Franks. Students may analyze medieval histories and chronicles, pagan myths and saints' lives, epic poetry and sagas, and modern historical scholarship. Classroom discussions and student research will focus on how these three societies constructed their own identities by recording and narrating their past.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Core Capacities
HIST-3433 The Middle Ages in Film
Description
This discussion-driven course examines how medieval history has been portrayed on the big screen. Our classroom discussions will focus on the historical foundations of three films and consider how the events they depict were understood by people living in the Middle Ages. Readings assignments will consist of medieval primary sources and secondary scholarship by modern authors; additional requirements include three research projects and an in-class research presentation. (Offered occasionally).
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
HIST-3434 History of Paris
Description
This course progresses chronologically from Gallo-Roman Paris to present, and explores the continuation and changes in these 2000 years of Parisian history. Students will be introduced to social movements, revolutions, wars, painting, sculpture, architecture, graphic art, music and literature as well as the geography and history of the city. Students will read representative texts from every period. (Offered every other year.)
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
HIST-3435 The Enlightenment
Description
This course examines the Enlightenment as both an intellectual and cultural watershed moment in the eighteenth century life in the West. Students will explore the social and political thought of the period, looking at a variety of topics such as natural law theory, religious toleration, and the critique of absolute monarchy. Time will also be devoted to examining the emerging cultural institutions in which such ideas took form and circulated from the second half of the seventeenth century to the French Revolution.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
HIST-3436 French Empire in the Americas, 1500-1800
Description
Examination of French exploration and settlement in the Americas from the fifteenth century to the reign of Napoleon. Topics may include political, economic, and cultural explanations for exploration, interaction with indigenes and slaves, daily life in the colonial era, and the growing tensions between France and other imperial powers.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
HIST-3439 The World War II Era
Description
Rise of the dictators and the road to war, 1919-1939; World War II in Europe, Africa and Asia; major Cold War events from 1945 to the death of Stalin.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities

Historiography, Thematic, and Comparative History (HIST)

HIST-3382 The City in History
Description
Cross-cultural examination of urban life in the pre-industrial, industrial, and contemporary cities of Asia, Europe, and the Americas with special emphasis on the U.S. urban experience. Interdisciplinary perspective drawing upon history, political science, sociology, and urban planning for an understanding of the complexity of urbanization. (Also listed as URBS 3305.)
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-3468 Public History, Memory, and Interpretation
Description
This course will provide students with practical experience in public history, material and visual culture, and oral history methods. It will familiarize students with the work historians do to interpret the past and share their interpretations with the public in museums, historic homes, archives, government agencies, private corporations, and the media. Requirements include regular in-class presentations, an exhibition critique, and a proposal for a historical exhibition on a topic of the student's choosing. (Offered every other year).
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities

Latin American History (HIST)

HIST-1340 Latin American Cultural Tradition
Description
Beginning with the first Americans and ending with contemporary Latin America, this course provides a synthetic overview of the emergence of distinctive cultural traditions in Latin America. The "old" worlds of Pre-Columbian American, Iberia, and Africa are studied as are the historical processes that created "new" world cultural traditions in Latin America.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
Approaches to Creation and Analysis, The Core Capacities
HIST-3340 Latin American Perspectives
Description
An examination of Latin American history through a study of 19th and 20th century texts from different social and ethnic groups; special attention to interpretations by Native Americans and African Americans. Prerequisite: HIST 1340 or consent of instructor.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-3344 Modern Brazil
Description
The history of Brazil form 1500 to present. Topics include: slavery and race relations; family life; Indians and the Amazon; the changing Catholic Church.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
Approaches to Creation and Analysis, The Core Capacities
HIST-3346 Modern Mexico
Description
Mexico since independence with emphasis on Juarez and the Reform, the Diaz regime, the Revolution, relations with the United States, and major developments since 1920.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
Approaches to Creation and Analysis, The Core Capacities
HIST-3348 Latin American Economic History
Description
A selective survey of the principal currents of economic growth and change in Latin America since the sixteenth century. Special attention given to the uneven formation of market economies, and to problems associated with colonialism and neo-colonialism; with international financial crises and adjustment; and with ideologically diverse models of development. (Also listed as ECON 3342.) Prerequisite: ECON 1311 and 1312
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division

Middle East History (HIST)

HIST-1350 Medieval Islamic History, 570 - 1517
Description
Historical developments in the Middle East from the life of the Prophet Muhammad to the establishment of the Ottoman Empire: the initial expansion of Islam, the Umayyad and Abbasid empires, Islamic Spain, the Crusades, Fatimid and Mamluk Egypt, and the Turco-Mongolian migrations and conquests.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Interdisciplinary Clusters, The Core Capacities
HIST-1351 The Modern Middle East
Description
Historical developments in the Middle East from the Ottoman conquest of Cairo in 1517 to the present: the Ottoman empire during the age of Sulayman the Magnificent, European imperialism in the Middle East and Ottoman reform efforts, the rise of Arab nationalism and of Zionism, World War I and the creation of the modern Arab state system, the development of oil, the Cold War in the Middle East, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and the Persian-Arabian Gulf arena.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
HIST-3452 Modern History of Syria
Description
After a brief survey of Syrian history going back to the Assyrians, Romans, Umayyads, Fatimids, Crusades, and Mamluks, this course will focus on a political, cultural and social examination of the modern history of Syria from the Ottoman period through the present, including Syria's vital role in the disposition of the Middle East during and after World War One, the French Mandate, the post-World War Two rise of Arab nationalism intertwined with the Arab and superpower cold wars, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and post-cold war peace efforts and political transitions in Syria itself under the Asad family.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
HIST-3454 The Modern History of the Persian Gulf Region Since 1500
Description
Examination of the history of the Persian-Arabian Gulf region from the rise of the Safavid Empire to the present; focus on political developments in Iran, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, and the Gulf Sheikdoms. Prerequisite: HIST 1350, 1351 or consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division

Seminars (HIST)

HIST-4400 Seminar in African History
Description
Seminars require advanced work both in the classroom and in the library. Classes are devoted to common readings and are designed to help the student master the major secondary works and the research methods appropriate to the topic; work in the library is to be devoted to the development of individual topics, research, and writing. The outcome of a seminar is a major research paper that represents the student's contribution to the broader historical debates within the particular field. Students may take a second seminar with the same course number if the topic offered under that number is different. Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-4420 Seminar in Asian History
Description
Seminars require advanced work both in the classroom and in the library. Classes are devoted to common readings and are designed to help the student master the major secondary works and the research methods appropriate to the topic; work in the library is to be devoted to the development of individual topics, research, and writing. The outcome of a seminar is a major research paper that represents the student's contribution to the broader historical debates within the particular field. Students may take a second seminar with the same course number if the topic offered under that number is different. Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-4430 Seminar in European History
Description
Seminars require advanced work both in the classroom and in the library. Classes are devoted to common readings and are designed to help the student master the major secondary works and the research methods appropriate to the topic; work in the library is to be devoted to the development of individual topics, research, and writing. The outcome of a seminar is a major research paper that represents the student's contribution to the broader historical debates within the particular field. Students may take a second seminar with the same course number if the topic offered under that number is different. Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-4440 Seminar in Latin American History
Description
Seminars require advanced work both in the classroom and in the library. Classes are devoted to common readings and are designed to help the student master the major secondary works and the research methods appropriate to the topic; work in the library is to be devoted to the development of individual topics, research, and writing. The outcome of a seminar is a major research paper that represents the student's contribution to the broader historical debates within the particular field. Students may take a second seminar with the same course number if the topic offered under that number is different. Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-4450 Seminar in Middle East History
Description
Seminars require advanced work both in the classroom and in the library. Classes are devoted to common readings and are designed to help the student master the major secondary works and the research methods appropriate to the topic; work in the library is to be devoted to the development of individual topics, research, and writing. The outcome of a seminar is a major research paper that represents the student's contribution to the broader historical debates within the particular field. Students may take a second seminar with the same course number if the topic offered under that number is different. Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-4460 Seminar in United States History A
Description
Seminars require advanced work both in the classroom and in the library. Classes are devoted to common readings and are designed to help the student master the major secondary works and the research methods appropriate to the topic; work in the library is to be devoted to the development of individual topics, research, and writing. The outcome of a seminar is a major research paper that represents the student's contribution to the broader historical debates within the particular field. Students may take a second seminar with the same course number if the topic offered under that number is different. Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-4470 Seminar in United States History B
Description
Seminars require advanced work both in the classroom and in the library. Classes are devoted to common readings and are designed to help the student master the major secondary works and the research methods appropriate to the topic; work in the library is to be devoted to the development of individual topics, research, and writing. The outcome of a seminar is a major research paper that represents the student's contribution to the broader historical debates within the particular field. Students may take a second seminar with the same course number if the topic offered under that number is different. Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division

Special Topics and Honors (HIST)

HIST-1392 Topics in History
Description
From time to time, the department will offer lower division courses not described in the Courses of Study Bulletin. May be repeated on different topics
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
HIST-3094 Public History Internship
Description
The Public History internship is a structured and supervised professional work experience with an accepted historical or cultural institution, non-profit organization, or history-related sector within a private business enterprise. To be recognized, the experience must be preapproved and must include specific learning objectives, weekly and final reflections from the intern, and evaluations from the employer. An internship is typically done by a student who has attained sufficient preparation in the academic field of history. The experience may be paid or unpaid. Variations in credit according to hours performed, from 0 to 6 hours. Must be taken on a Pass/Fail basis. (Offered every semester). Prerequisite: Consent of the internship coordinator and the History Department chair.
Credits
0 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-3190 Independent Study
Description
Independent study in selected areas. 1 to 6 semester hours. Prerequisites: 6 advanced hours in history and consent of instructor.
Credits
1 credit
Level
Upper Division
HIST-3192 Special Topics in History
Description
From time to time the department will offer special topic courses not described in the Courses of Study Bulletin. Announcement of such courses will be by special prospectus. May be repeated on different topics.
Credits
1 credit
Level
Upper Division
HIST-3194 Public History Internship
Description
The Public History internship is a structured and supervised professional work experience with an accepted historical or cultural institution, non-profit organization, or history-related sector within a private business enterprise. To be recognized, the experience must be preapproved and must include specific learning objectives, weekly and final reflections from the intern, and evaluations from the employer. An internship is typically done by a student who has attained sufficient preparation in the academic field of history. The experience may be paid or unpaid. Variations in credit according to hours performed, from 0 to 6 hours. Must be taken on a Pass/Fail basis. (Offered every semester). Prerequisite: Consent of the internship coordinator and the History Department chair.
Credits
1 credit
Level
Upper Division
HIST-3290 Independent Study
Description
Independent study in selected areas. 1 to 6 semester hours. Prerequisites: 6 advanced hours in history and consent of instructor.
Credits
2 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-3292 Special Topics in History
Description
From time to time the department will offer special topic courses not described in the Courses of Study Bulletin. Announcement of such courses will be by special prospectus. May be repeated on different topics.
Credits
2 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-3294 Public History Internship
Description
The Public History internship is a structured and supervised professional work experience with an accepted historical or cultural institution, non-profit organization, or history-related sector within a private business enterprise. To be recognized, the experience must be preapproved and must include specific learning objectives, weekly and final reflections from the intern, and evaluations from the employer. An internship is typically done by a student who has attained sufficient preparation in the academic field of history. The experience may be paid or unpaid. Variations in credit according to hours performed, from 0 to 6 hours. Must be taken on a Pass/Fail basis. (Offered every semester). Prerequisite: Consent of the internship coordinator and the History Department chair.
Credits
2 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-3388 Methods of Instruction History
Description
Examination of various ways to teach history at the elementary, secondary, or college levels with special emphasis on the inquiry process. Students will work with both original and secondary sources and develop an extensive teaching unit as a final project. Topics may include Texas, U.S., or world history.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-3390 Independent Study
Description
Independent study in selected areas. 1 to 6 semester hours. Prerequisites: 6 advanced hours in history and consent of instructor.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-3392 Special Topics in History
Description
From time to time the department will offer special topic courses not described in the Courses of Study Bulletin. Announcement of such courses will be by special prospectus. May be repeated on different topics.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-3394 Public History Internship
Description
The Public History internship is a structured and supervised professional work experience with an accepted historical or cultural institution, non-profit organization, or history-related sector within a private business enterprise. To be recognized, the experience must be preapproved and must include specific learning objectives, weekly and final reflections from the intern, and evaluations from the employer. An internship is typically done by a student who has attained sufficient preparation in the academic field of history. The experience may be paid or unpaid. Variations in credit according to hours performed, from 0 to 6 hours. Must be taken on a Pass/Fail basis. (Offered every semester). Prerequisite: Consent of the internship coordinator and the History Department chair.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-3490 Independent Study
Description
Independent study in selected areas. 1 to 6 semester hours. Prerequisites: 6 advanced hours in history and consent of instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-3494 Public History Internship
Description
The Public History internship is a structured and supervised professional work experience with an accepted historical or cultural institution, non-profit organization, or history-related sector within a private business enterprise. To be recognized, the experience must be preapproved and must include specific learning objectives, weekly and final reflections from the intern, and evaluations from the employer. An internship is typically done by a student who has attained sufficient preparation in the academic field of history. The experience may be paid or unpaid. Variations in credit according to hours performed, from 0 to 6 hours. Must be taken on a Pass/Fail basis. (Offered every semester). Prerequisite: Consent of the internship coordinator and the History Department chair.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-3594 Public History Internship
Description
The Public History internship is a structured and supervised professional work experience with an accepted historical or cultural institution, non-profit organization, or history-related sector within a private business enterprise. To be recognized, the experience must be preapproved and must include specific learning objectives, weekly and final reflections from the intern, and evaluations from the employer. An internship is typically done by a student who has attained sufficient preparation in the academic field of history. The experience may be paid or unpaid. Variations in credit according to hours performed, from 0 to 6 hours. Must be taken on a Pass/Fail basis. (Offered every semester). Prerequisite: Consent of the internship coordinator and the History Department chair.
Credits
5 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-3690 Independent Study
Description
Independent study in selected areas. 1 to 6 semester hours. Prerequisites: 6 advanced hours in history and consent of instructor.
Credits
6 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-3694 Public History Internship
Description
The Public History internship is a structured and supervised professional work experience with an accepted historical or cultural institution, non-profit organization, or history-related sector within a private business enterprise. To be recognized, the experience must be preapproved and must include specific learning objectives, weekly and final reflections from the intern, and evaluations from the employer. An internship is typically done by a student who has attained sufficient preparation in the academic field of history. The experience may be paid or unpaid. Variations in credit according to hours performed, from 0 to 6 hours. Must be taken on a Pass/Fail basis. (Offered every semester). Prerequisite: Consent of the internship coordinator and the History Department chair.
Credits
6 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-4498 Honors Thesis
Description
Individual research and scholarly investigation under faculty supervision leading to the preparation of an Honors Thesis. To be taken only by Senior Honors students in their first semester of their senior year.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-4499 Honors Thesis
Description
Individual research and scholarly investigation under faculty supervision leading to the preparation of an Honors Thesis. To be taken only by Senior Honors students in their second semester of their senior year.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division

United States History (HIST)

HIST-1360 The History of the United States Through Reconstruction
Description
An integrative survey of major political, economic and social developments in the history of the United States of America from colonial settlement through the post-Civil War era of Reconstruction.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
Approaches to Creation and Analysis, The Interdisciplinary Clusters, The Core Capacities
HIST-1361 The History of the United States Since Reconstruction
Description
An integrative survey of the political, economic and diplomatic history of the United States of America from Reconstruction to the present, emphasizing those factors most influential in shaping contemporary society.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
Approaches to Creation and Analysis, The Interdisciplinary Clusters
HIST-1370 The African American Experience Through Reconstruction
Description
This course focuses on the social, cultural, and political history of African Americans from approximately 1619 to 1877. Topics may include the genesis and evolution of Black slavery and freedom, the Revolutionary War, Nat Turner's Rebellion, and the Civil War and Reconstruction. Particular emphasis is placed on changing ideals of freedom and how African Americans struggled both to achieve and then redefine ever-evolving conceptions of freedom, whether understood politically, socially, or economically.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
HIST-1371 The African American Experience Since Reconstruction
Description
This course focuses on the social, cultural, and political history of African Americans from approximately 1877 to the present. Topics may include the genesis and evolution of Jim Crow, Black urban migration, the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights Movement, and the Black Power Movements. Particular emphasis is placed on changing ideals of freedom and how African Americans struggled both to achieve and then redefine ever-evolving conceptions of freedom, whether understood politically, socially, or economically.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
HIST-2435 Native American History Through Removal (before 1830)
Description
This course broadens the scope of U.S. history to include the complex societies that predated European colonization and uses interdisciplinary methods to revive the histories of America's diverse Indigenous populations before removal became official U.S. policy and the reservation system restricted Native American mobility and sovereignty. We will consider in depth the ways in which historians and museums have presented pre-Columbian and colonial Indigenous history to the public and the approaches with which we can recover marginalized perspectives. (Offered every other year.)
Credits
4 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Core Capacities
HIST-2436 Native American History Since Removal
Description
From Tonto to Moana, U.S. popular culture is filled with mythological images of Native Americans that scarcely resemble real Indigenous peoples and their complex identities. This course in modern Native American history offers a corrective to such mythologies by emphasizing the historical experiences and perspectives of Indigenous peoples. Together we will examine topics as diverse as: Indigenous slavery, the debate over U.S. citizenship, boarding schools, sovereignty and casinos, forced sterilization, and the complicated relationships with the U.S. environmentalist movement from "Iron Eyes Cody" to Standing Rock. We will explore the historical reasons why tropes like the "noble savage" supplanted the particular histories of Indigenous peoples and the ways in which those myths continue to overshadow our understanding of Native communities today. (Offered every other year.)
Credits
4 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Core Capacities
HIST-2440 U.S. Society and Politics Since 1945
Description
This writing-intensive seminar-style course will introduce historical methods and skills through a study of the United States since 1945. We will explore how politics, foreign policy, and culture interacted to shape American society and the role of the United States in the world. Social movements, hot button political issues, and global conflict will feature prominently in our course readings and discussions. We will examine primary sources, conduct secondary research, and develop our own historical hypotheses about this period. Writing assignments will include primary source analyses, secondary critiques, and a final research project. (Offered every other year.)
Credits
4 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Interdisciplinary Clusters
HIST-3361 Economic and Business History of the United States Since 1865
Description
A study of the development of the American economy from the U.S. Civil War to the present. (Also listed as ECON 3345 and BUSN 3345.) Prerequisites: ECON 1311 and 3 hours of U.S. history or consent of instructor.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Interdisciplinary Clusters
HIST-3363 Early American Social History
Description
Discussion-oriented course focusing on the everyday life of ordinary people from the initial cultural contacts among Europeans, Native Americans, and Africans brought to the New World down through the Revolutionary period. Emphasis on the development and maturation of diverse mainland and island communities in British North America, as well as regional and temporal variations in gender, race, and class relations. Prerequisite: At lease one lower-division course in US History through Reconstruction or Consent of Instructor.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
HIST-3366 U.S. Intellectual History Since the Civil War
Description
This discussion-based course focuses on significant changes in American thought from 1865 to the 1990s. Topics may include changing ideas about religion, science, modernity, democracy, social reform, race, and gender. The course will stress critical analysis of primary texts. Prerequisites: At least one lower-division course in U.S. history since the Civil War, or consent of instructor
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-3370 Free Blacks in America
Description
This course traces the lives of free blacks in America from the early seventeenth century to the Civil War. The course examines free blacks in relation to the origins of American slavery, the Revolutionary War, black radicalism, community development, antebellum slavery, and the American Civil War. Attention will be given to issues of class, gender, and identity. Prerequisite: At lease one lower-division US History course, or Consent of Instructor.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-3372 Black Images in Film
Description
Examines the depictions of blacks in America cinema from 1915 to present. This course introduces students to the history of blacks in film and examines how film has been used as a tool of social and political commentary. Attention will be given to issues of race, color, class, and gender. Prerequisite: At least one lower division U.S. history course or consent of instructor.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Interdisciplinary Clusters
HIST-3374 The Old South
Description
Historical developments in the South from the late sixteenth century through the Civil War. This course will examine the South in relation to such major topics as the Revolutionary War, slavery, and the rise and fall of the Confederacy. Attention will be given to issues of race, class, gender, identity, and political ideology. Prerequisite: At lease one lower-division US History course, or Consent of Instructor.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-3375 The Civil War and Reconstruction
Description
This course focuses on the Civil War and Reconstruction as dramatic and defining episodes in American history. Student will examine the emerging sectional conflicts that led up to the war, the military and social history of the war itself, and Reconstruction, with particular attention given to the construction of "freedom" following the upheaval. The class will focus on race, class, gender, and the shaping of individual and collective identities. Prerequisite: At lease one lower-division US History course, or Consent of Instructor.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-3376 History of Texas
Description
Spanish and Mexican periods; revolution and the Republic; social, political, and economic changes since statehood.
Credits
3 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-3464 Politics and Protest in Early America
Description
This course will examine American political history from the earliest colonial settlements through the antebellum era, emphasizing the informal political speech of those outside formal structures of governance. We will explore the ways in which ordinary people--pirates and mutineers, Indigenous activists, religious reformers, petitioners, vigilantes, pamphleteers, runaway slaves, anonymous newspaper columnists, boycott organizers, and rebels--used their political voices to demand a "redress of grievances" from governing authorities, sometimes turning to violence when words did not achieve their ends. Approaching early American politics from diverse perspectives allows us to consider from many historical angles: why the right to free speech and petition was the first freedom enshrined in the Bill of Rights, how individuals interpreted and attempted to expand the definition of "we the people," and what role a free press played in the founding of the United States. After taking this course, you will have a historical basis for understanding the ethical, social, and political questions raised by the rights enshrined in the First Amendment that continue to shape public discourses today. (Offered every other year.)
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities
HIST-3465 The American Revolution
Description
Historical interpretations of the period 1763-1793 with focus on the Stamp Act crisis, the final break and war with Great Britain, and state and national constitution-making. Prerequisite: At least one lower-division history course in US History through Reconstruction or Consent of Instructor.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
HIST-3469 U.S. Foreign Relations
Description
A survey of key events, policies, personalities, and ideas that shaped American foreign relations between the late nineteenth century and the present. (Offered every year)
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities

History (HIST)

HIST-2424 Global China: a History of Migration
Description
Today, overseas Chinese comprise the fourth-largest diaspora in the world, with millions of Chinese citizens creating communities in nearly every country in the world. The purpose of this class is to explore the history of these overseas communities, taking note of how migration has shaped the identities, cultures, and lived experiences of people who claim some connection to the space that today we call China. Our class will begin in the sixteenth century, which saw the first sustained migrations of peoples from China into Southeast Asia following the Ming dynasty's removal of a ban on maritime trade, and continue to the present day. (Offered every other year.)
Credits
4 credits
Level
Lower Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Core Capacities
HIST-3438 History of the Holocaust
Description
This course explores the origins, implementation, and legacy of the Nazi murder of six million Jews in Europe during World War II. Special attention will be paid to the motivations and actions of the perpetrators, the perspectives of the victims, and historiographical debates concerning the genocide. (Also listed as GRST 3438.)
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Interdisciplinary Clusters, The Core Capacities
HIST-3442 American Migrant Cities
Description
This course interrogates "migrant cities" in the Americas, that is, cities that grew and developed in relationship to the movement of millions of peoples across regions, borders, and oceans. We will consider three broad migrations: 1) European migrations to Atlantic metropoles such as New York, Buenos Aires, and São Paulo between 1870 and 1930; 2) internal migrations of people (including of African and Indigenous descent) from the U.S. South to northern cities; from the Brazilian northeast to its southern industrial cities; and from peasant communities to cities such as Lima and Mexico City; 3) finally, we will study the South-North migration from Mexico and Central America to the U.S. between 1970 and the present. By comparing these migrations in the United States and Latin America, we will explore how the movement of people has shaped cities across the hemisphere and we will interrogate the commonalities and common histories of both regions. In the process, we will challenge several myths about the United States and Latin America: Is the U.S. "melting pot" truly exceptional or has the whole continent been impacted by migrations across regions and borders? Have cities represented spaces of opportunity and liberation for migrants or are they sites where inequality and oppression have simply adopted a different form? How does legal status, race/ethnicity, and economic conditions influence how migrants fare in their new cities? Is the presence of Latinos in U.S. cities a new phenomenon or and an old one? Does this presence represent a threat, an opportunity, or more of the same?
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Pathways Curriculum
The Core Capacities, The Core Capacities
HIST-3492 Special Topics in History
Description
From time to time the department will offer special topic courses not described in the Courses of Study Bulletin. Announcement of such courses will be by special prospectus. May be repeated on different topics.
Credits
4 credits
Level
Upper Division
Anene Ejikeme
Anene Ejikeme, Ph.D.
Department Chair
Associate Professor
" "
Todd Barnett, Ph.D.
Visiting Assistant Professor
" "
Emilio De Antuñano , Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
" "
Paul Donohue
Academic Office Administrator
Jason Johnson
Jason Johnson, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Erin Kramer
Erin Kramer, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Carey Latimore
Carey Latimore, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
David Lesch
David Lesch, Ph.D.
Ewing Halsell Distinguished Professor of History
" "
Kenneth Loiselle, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Nicole Marafioti
Nicole Marafioti, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Gina Anne Tam
Gina Anne Tam, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Lauren Turek
Lauren Turek, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor

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