Welcome, students!

Trinity welcomes new and transferring international Tigers of all stripes! ISSS assists with application information, records and documents, and preparation for your visa interview.

 International Student Handbook

 Three international women students pose at the international dinner reception.

 

Become a Tiger in 3 Steps

STEP 1

Apply to Trinity

You are an international first-year or transfer applicant if you are not a U.S. citizen or U.S. permanent resident.

Step 1 

STEP 2

Prepare for Arrival

Ease the transition to the United States, San Antonio, and Trinity University, and understand requirements and documents.

Step 2 

STEP 3

Make Campus Your Home

Welcome to Trinity! From housing to dining to employment opportunities, campus amenities can help make it feel like home.

Step 3  

STEP 1

Apply to Trinity

All new and transfer international students are required to submit an application to Trinity University. Students who are granted enrollment must submit a deposit by their required deposit deadline.

Apply to Trinity as an international first-year or transfer student if you are not a U.S. citizen or U.S. permanent resident, regardless of where you went to secondary school.

International Student Application Details

Before submitting your Trinity application, consider how the following may affect you and your family:

STEP 2

Prepare for Arrival

As you prepare to enter the U.S. and become a Trinity student, there are several steps you and your family should take to help ease the transition.

 We're here to help!

During the summer and ISO, your primary contact will be the I-Team member to which you are assigned.

Email isss@trinity.edu to get in touch with ISSS staff.

 Watch your email!

The 2021 International Student Handbook will arrive via email with your I-20. Let this document serve as your guide throughout this process.


Applying for an F-1 Visa

Make an appointment at the local U.S. embassy or consulate and compile the documents they require for the F-1 visa application.

Additional information:

  •  Read in your International Student Handbook:

    • Prior to Your Arrival at Trinity
    • After Entry into the United States

What to Expect Upon Arrival

Welcome to the United States, and to San Antonio! There are a few steps to take before you check-in at Trinity, and the information below will help set expectations.

  •  Read in your International Student Handbook:

    • Arriving in San Antonio
    • Transportation Options

Airport Arrangements

Arriving students are responsible for making their own arrangements from the San Antonio International Airport (SAT) to Trinity’s campus.

  •  If you need airport pick-up, you must complete a Pre-Arrival Form, which will be made available to new students during the summer.


International Student Check-In and Orientation

International Student Orientation (ISO) is mandatory for all new international students on F-1 and other nonimmigrant visas.

 

ISO Dates

ISO takes place August 18-19, 2021. ISO helps you meet immediate needs and prepares you for New Student Orientation (NSO) directly after. Parents and families are welcome to attend all ISO sessions with their students.

 

ISO I-Team

In June, your ISO I-Team member, a current Trinity student, will contact you. Throughout the summer, s/he will be available to answer any questions you have, primarily by email. S/he will be your guide as you prepare to move to Trinity!

  •  Read in your International Student Handbook:

    • Orientation Course
    • Moving In
    • Advising and Registration
    • Information for Families

Your Student Account and Email

Your Trinity account (including email and account login information) should be active within 10 days of placing your deposit with Trinity University.

For more information on initial access to your online Trinity account, visit Information Technology Services.


Health Insurance and Meningococcal Vaccination

Trinity University requires all students, undergraduate and graduate, enrolled for nine or more semester hours or enrolled in a full-time graduate program to have current hospitalization and accident insurance.

You will be billed for health insurance.

To comply with the mandatory health insurance requirement all students will be billed for annual coverage of the student health plan in July.

 Visit Health Services for plan details and costs.

You may apply for a waiver of Trinity health insurance.

If you have other personal health insurance and don’t want the student health plan you must submit an online insurance waiver annually. If the waiver is not completed by the deadline you will be enrolled in the student health plan and the corresponding charge cannot be cancelled.

 Visit Health Services for waiver information.

Health Record Form

Trinity students living on campus are required to have a complete Health Record form on file. This includes a completed physical exam form as well as information regarding immunizations and health insurance coverage.

 Visit Health Services for info on the Health Record Form.

Meningococcal Vaccination

The Meningococcal Vaccine is required by Texas state law and must be administered at least 10 days before the first day of classes.

  •  Read in your International Student Handbook:

    • Health Care and Insurance

STEP 3

Make Campus Your Home

Welcome to Trinity University! We are here to help make this new campus, city, state, and country your home away from home. All of Trinity’s departments and offices have available support for international students.

 Dedicated to Student Success

Use these helpful links in your journey to becoming a Trinity Tiger:


Hi, Roomie!

As a residential university, Trinity is focused on learning through living. The University’s three-year residency requirement means you’ll have ample opportunity to get to know your classmates and make new friends from all walks of life.

Residential Life Trinity Dining Services

  •  Read in your International Student Handbook:

    • Useful Resources
    • International Club
    • International Engagement
    • Exploring San Antonio
    • Trinity Facts and Traditions
  1. Contact your roommate ahead of time to get acquainted. Research a little about Texas and America, so you can talk with your roommate about what you already know about their home.
  2. If you are flying, your luggage allowance is limited. Make sure your roommate knows this so they are aware you may not be able to contribute as many things to your shared area—most American roommates are more than understanding about this!
  3. Make the best of your first-year experience: Fight feelings of isolation by being involved with your roommate and your new lifestyle as much as possible. It’s comforting to have a familiar face to come home to, and you have the added benefit of receiving great social and cultural advice.
  4. Ask questions about your roommate’s background and interests, and share your own. The more you know about each other, the more you will understand and appreciate the diverse perspectives.
  5. While the media may color your impression of what Americans are, please try to be open-minded and prepared to learn about a society that is diverse, complex, and can’t be reduced to stereotypes. Ask your roommate about important differences that exist between regions, urban and rural areas, and social classes.
  6. Try to speak in English with your roommate, but don’t feel that communication has to be perfect! Trinity students are very welcoming of diversity, and your roommate will appreciate your efforts. Ask them to explain commonly misunderstood aspects of the English language, or anything verbal you’re not sure of.
  7. Consider time differences, especially if you need to make international calls to your family at what may seem to be inconvenient times of day for your roommate. Work together to identify times to make personal calls that suit both of you.
  8. If you are unable to return home during breaks, your roommate may offer for you to go home or on holiday with them. This is a great way to experience more of America! Remember to offer to contribute in any little way to show appreciation for them bringing you into their home.
  1. Contact your roommate ahead of time to get acquainted. Research their home country, so you can talk with your roommate about what you already know about their home.
  2. Since international students are usually limited as to how much they can bring with them, offer any extras that you can, if you have room and means: bedding, pillows, bath towels, small lamps, clothes hangers, and small storage.
  3. International students may be shy in talking to you because they are unsure of social cues and may feel uncomfortable speaking English. Help them feel comfortable by opening up to them, inviting them to meals, and bringing them on errands with other friends.
  4. As questions about your roommate’s home country, family, culture, religion, and more. The more you know about each other, the more you will understand and appreciate the diverse perspectives.
  5. International students may have preconceived notions that color their impression of what it’s like to live in America, or who Americans are. Help them learn about American society through discussions on important differences that exist between regions, urban and rural areas, and social classes.
  6. Ask your roommate to teach you a few helpful phrases in their native language, like “Thank you” or “Hello.” If you already speak some of their language, try to speak it with them whenever possible—you’ll get a sense of how your roommate feels trying to speak English all the time.
  7. International students may need to make personal calls to their families at what may seem to be inconvenient times of day or night. Work together to identify times to make personal calls that suit both of you.
  8. During long breaks (Thanksgiving, spring break, etc.), your roommate may not have a place to stay except the residence halls. If you can, offer to take your roommate home or on vacation with you, or offer to help them make plans to stay with other friends in town.
  9. International students may deal with some physical, mental, and social challenges while living in the US. The majority go home feeling positive about their experience and believe that the time spent abroad was beneficial academically and personally.
  10. Keep in touch with your roommate after they return home for the summer or after graduation. If you're ever planning to travel to your roommate's country, staying in touch will ensure that you have a friend to call when you visit their hometown!